706 Common German Surnames

ABEL (2) German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name ALBERT.
ABELN German
Patronymic derived from a diminutive of ALBERT.
ABRAHAM Jewish, English, German, French, Spanish, Dutch
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM.
ABT German
German cognate of ABATE.
ACHILLES German
Derived from the given name ACHILLES.
ACHTERBERG Dutch, German
From the name of various places in the Netherlands and Germany, for example the village of achterberg in Utrecht. The place names are derived from Low German achter “behind” and berg “mountain, hill”.
ACKER German, English
Denoted a person who lived near a field, derived from Middle English aker or Middle High German acker meaning “field”.
ACKERMANN German
Denoted a person who lived near a field, from Middle High German acker “field” and man “man”.
ADAM English, French, German, Polish, Romanian, Jewish
Derived from the given name ADAM.
ADENAUER German
Denoted a person from the town of Adenau in Germany. The name of the town is of uncertain etymology.
ADLER German, Jewish
Means “eagle” in German.
ALBERT English, French, Catalan, Hungarian, Romanian, German
Derived from the given name ALBERT.
ALBRECHT German
From the given name ALBRECHT.
ALESHIRE German
Anglicized form of ALSCHER.
ALSCHER German
Means “son of ADALHEIDIS”.
ALTHAUS German
Name for a person dwelled in or by an old house, from German alt “old” and haus “house”.
AMSEL (2) German
Means “blackbird” in German.
ANDREAS German, Greek
Derived from the given name ANDREAS.
ANDRES German
Derived from the given name ANDREAS.
ARBEIT German
From German arbeit meaning “work”.
ARMBRÜSTER German
Variant of ARMBRUSTER.
ARMBRUSTER German
Means “crossbow maker” from German armbrust “crossbow”. The word armbrust was originally from Latin arcuballista meaning “bow ballista”, but was modified under the influence of German arm “arm” and brust “breast”.
AUE German
From German meaning “meadow by a river, wetland”. There are many places with this name in Germany, Austria and Switzerland.
AUER German
From German aue meaning “meadow by a river, wetland”.
AUGUSTIN French, German
From the given name AUGUSTIN.
AUST German
Derived from Aust, an archaic diminutive of AUGUST.
BACH German
Topographic name for someone who lived by a stream, from Middle High German bach meaning “stream”. This name was borne by members of the Bach musical family, notably the composer Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750).
BACHMAN German
Anglicized form of BACHMANN.
BACHMANN German
Denoted a person who lived near a stream, from German bach “stream” and mann “man”.
BACHMEIER German
Originally referred to a farmer whose farm was beside a stream, from Middle High German bach “stream” and meier “steward, tenant farmer”.
BÄCKER German
Variant of BECKER, mostly found in northern Germany.
BADER German
Derived from Old High German bad “bath”, most likely referring to a bath attendant.
BÄHR German
From Middle High German bër “bear” or ber “boar”. This was originally a nickname for a strong or brave person.
BAIER German
Variant of BAYER.
BAMBACH German
Variant of BAUMBACH.
BAUER German
From Old High German bur meaning “peasant, farmer”.
BAUERS German
Variant of BAUER.
BAUM German, Jewish
Means “tree” in German.
BAUMANN German, Jewish
From Middle High German bumann meaning “farmer, builder”.
BAUMBACH German
From a place name meaning “tree stream” in German.
BAUMER German
Variant of BAUM.
BAUMGARTEN German
Variant of BAUMGARTNER.
BAUMGÄRTNER German
Variant of BAUMGARTNER.
BAUMGARTNER German
Occupational name for a person who worked or lived at an orchard, from German Baumgarten “orchard” (derived from Baum “tree” and Garten “garden”).
BAUMHAUER German
Occupational name meaning “woodcutter”, derived from German Baum “tree” and hauen “to chop”.
BAYER German
Originally denoted a person from Bavaria, from its German name BAYERN.
BECK (1) English, German, Danish, Swedish, Norwegian
Cognate of BACH, from Middle English bekke (from Old Norse), Low German beke or Old Norse bekkr all meaning “stream”.
BECK (2) German
Variant of BECKER, from southern German beck.
BECKE German
Variant of BECK (1) or BECK (2).
BECKENBAUER German
Means “farmer living by a stream” in German.
BECKER German
Derived from Middle High German becker meaning “baker”.
BECKERT German
Variant of BECKER.
BEHREND German
Derived from the given name BERND.
BEHRENDS German
Derived from the given name BERND.
BEHRINGER German
From the given name BERENGAR.
BEITEL German
Variant of BEUTEL.
BELTZ German
Occupational name for a tanner of hides, derived from Middle High German belz meaning “fur”.
BERG German, Dutch, Swedish, Norwegian, Danish
From a Germanic word meaning “mountain”.
BERGER (2) German, Dutch
Variant of BERG.
BERGMANN German
From Old High German berg “mountain” and man “man”, originally denoting someone who lived on a mountain.
BERINGER German, English
From the given name BERENGAR.
BERNHARD German
From the given name BERNHARD.
BEST (2) German
Derived from the name of the river Beste, meaning unknown.
BEUTEL German
From Middle High German biutel meaning “bag”, originally belonging to a person who made or sold bags.
BEYER German
Variant of BAYER.
BEYERSDORF German
Means “farmers village”, from German Bauer meaning “farmer” and Dorf meaning “village”.
BIEBER German, Jewish
From Middle High German biber meaning “beaver”, possibly a nickname for a hard worker.
BIERMANN German
Derived from German bier “beer” and mann “man”. The name may have referred to a brewer or a tavern owner.
BISCHOFFS German
German cognate of BISHOP.
BLAU German
Means “blue” in German, most likely used to refer to a person who wore blue clothes.
BLECHER German
Occupational name for someone who worked with tin or sheet metal, from German blech “tin”.
BLEIER German
Occupational name for a worker of lead, derived from German blei “lead”.
BLUM German, Jewish
Means “flower” in German and Yiddish.
BLUMENTHAL German, Jewish
Derived from German Blumen “flowers” and Thal “valley”.
BÖCKER German
Variant of BÖTTCHER.
BOEHLER German
Variant of BÖHLER.
BOESCH German, Low German
Variant of BÖSCH (1) or BÖSCH (2).
BÖHLER German
Derived from the name of several German towns called Boll or Böhl, meaning “hill”.
BÖHM German
Originally indicated a person from the region of BOHEMIA (Böhmen in German).
BÖHME German
Variant of BÖHM.
BÖHMER German, Jewish
Variant of BÖHM.
BOHN German
Occupational name for a bean grower, derived from Middle High German bone “bean”.
BORCHARD German
Derived from the given name BURKHARD.
BORCHARDT German
Derived from the given name BURKHARD.
BÖSCH (1) German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name SEBASTIAN.
BÖTTCHER German
Occupational name meaning “cooper, barrel maker” in German.
BRABAND German
Derived from the name of the region of Brabant in the Netherlands and Belgium. It possibly means “ploughed region” or “marshy region” in Old High German.
BRAHMS German
Derived from the given name ABRAHAM. A famous bearer of this surname was the German composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897).
BRAND (1) German, English
Derived from the Germanic given name BRANDO or its Old Norse cognate BRANDR.
BRAND (2) German
From Old High German brant “fire”, originally a name for a person who lived near an area that had been cleared by fire.
BRÄNDLE German
Derived from a diminutive of the Germanic given name BRANDO.
BRANDT German
Variant of BRAND (1) or BRAND (2).
BRANT German, English
Variant of BRAND (1) and BRAND (2).
BRANTLEY German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of BRÄNDLE.
BRAUN German
Variant of BRUN.
BRAUNE German
Variant of BRUN.
BREINER German, Swedish
Occupational name derived from Middle High German brie “porridge”.
BREISACHER German
Originally denoted one who came from the town of Breisach, in Germany. The town’s name is possibly from a Celtic word meaning “breakwater”.
BREITBARTH German
From Old High German breit “broad” and bart “beard”, originally a nickname for someone with a full beard.
BRETZ German
Indicated a person from the town of Breetz in Brandenburg, Germany. The meaning of the town’s name is unknown.
BRINKERHOFF German
From a German place name meaning “farm near a slope”.
BRODBECK German
Means “bread baker” from Middle High German brot “bread” and becke “baker”.
BROSE German
Derived from the given name AMBROSE.
BROTZ German
Variant of PROTZ.
BRUHN German
Variant of BRUN.
BRUN German
From Middle High German brun meaning “brown”. It was originally a nickname for a person who had brown hair or skin.
BRUNE German
Variant of BRUN.
BUCHHOLZ German
From Middle High German buoche “beech” and holz “wood”.
BUCKHOLTZ German (Anglicized)
Anglicized form of BUCHHOLZ.
BUMGARNER German
Variant of BAUMGARTNER.
BURGSTALLER German
From German Burg “fortress, castle” and Stelle “place, position”. This was a name given to a person dwelling at or near such a site.
BUSCH German
Means “bush” in German, a name for someone who lived close to a thicket.
CARL English, German
From the given name CARL.
CHRISTIAN English, French, German
Derived from the given name CHRISTIAN.
CLINE German, Jewish
Anglicized spelling of KLEIN.
DANIEL English, French, German, Portuguese
Derived from the given name DANIEL.
DAUBE German
Variant of TAUBE.
DENZEL German
Variant of TANZER.
DERICHS German
Means “son of DIRK”.
DIEFENBACH German
From a German place name meaning “deep creek”.
DIETER German
Derived from the given name DIETER.
DIETRICH German
Derived from the given name DIETRICH.
DIRKS Dutch, German
Means “son of DIRK”.
DIRKSEN Dutch, German
Means “son of DIRK”.
DITTMAR German
Derived from the given name DIETMAR.
DOHMAN German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name THOMAS.
DRECHSLER German
Variant of DRESSLER.
DREHER German
Means “turner” from Middle High German drehen “to turn”. A turner was a person who used a lathe to create small objects from wood or bone.
DREIER German
Variant of DREHER.
DRESCHNER German
Derived from Middle High German dreschen “to thresh”. A thresher was a person who separated the grains from a cereal plant by beating it.
DRESDNER German
Originally indicated a person who came from the city of Dresden in German.
DRESSLER German
Means “turner” from Middle High German dreseler, an agent derivative of drehen “to turn”. A turner was a person who used a lathe to create small objects from wood or bone.
DREYER German
Variant of DREHER.
DUERR German
Variant of DÜRR.
DUNKEL German
Means “dark” in German.
DUNST German
Derived from Middle High German dunst “haze”.
DÜRR German
Means “thin” in German.
EBERHARDT German
Derived from the given name EBERHARD.
EBNER (1) German
Originally indicated a dweller on a flat piece of land, derived from Middle High German ebene “plateau”.
EBNER (2) German
Means “judge, arbiter” from Middle High German ebenære.
ECKSTEIN German
From Old High German ecka meaning “edge, corner” and stein meaning “stone”.
EGGER German
South German occupational name meaning “plowman” or “farmer”, derived from German eggen “to harrow, to plow”.
EICHEL German
Means “acorn” in German, indicating a person who lived near an oak tree.
EILERTS German
Derived from the given name EILERT.
ENGEL German
Derived from German given names beginning with Engel, such as ENGELBERT.
ENNS German
Derived from a short form of the German given name ANSELM.
ESSER German
Means “cartwright”, related to Old High German ahsa “axle”.
ESSERT German
Variant of ESSER.
EVERHART German
Variant of EBERHARDT.
FABEL German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name FABIAN.
FABIAN German, English, Polish
Derived from the given name FABIAN.
FAERBER German
Variant of FÄRBER.
FALK Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, German
From Old Norse falkr or Middle High German valke meaning “falcon”.
FALKENRATH German
Derived from Germanic falke “falcon” and rad “counsel”.
FÄRBER German
Occupational name meaning “dyer”, derived from German Farbe “colour”.
FASHINGBAUER German
From Fasching, a German carnival (Fastnacht meaning “eve of the beginning of the fast”, or the time before Lent) celebrated in Austria and Bavaria, and bauer meaning “farmer”.
FAUST German
Derived from the given name Faust, a form of FAUSTUS.
FEIGENBAUM German, Jewish
Means “fig tree” in German.
FELD German, Jewish
Means “field” in German. The name was originally given to someone who lived on land cleared of forest.
FELDT German, Danish, Swedish
North German, Danish and Swedish variant of FELD.
FENSTERMACHER German
Means “window maker” in German.
FERBER German
Variant of FÄRBER.
FERTIG German
Means “ready, prepared” in German.
FIEDLER German
Means “fiddler” in German.
FISCHER German
Occupational name meaning “fisherman” in German.
FLATER German
Means “reed bed” in German.
FLEISCHER German
Occupational name meaning “butcher” in German.
FOERSTNER German
Variant of FÖRSTNER.
FORNEY German
Name for someone who lived near ferns, from Old High German farn “fern”.
FORST German
Derived from Old High German forst “forest”. Probably unrelated to the Old French word forest, which was derived from Latin, Old High German forst was derived from foraha meaning “fir tree”.
FÖRSTNER German
Denoted a keeper or one in charge of a forest (see FORST).
FRANK (3) German, Dutch, Danish, Norwegian
Name for a person from Franconia in Germany, so called because it was settled by the Frankish people.
FRANKE German, Dutch
Variant of FRANK (3).
FREI German
Means “free” in German, probably referring to someone outside the feudal system.
FREUD German, Jewish
Means “joy” in German, a nickname for a cheerful person. A famous bearer was the psychologist Sigmund Freud (1856-1939).
FREUDENBERGER German, Jewish
Ornamental name from old German freud meaning “joy” and berg meaning “mountain”.
FREUND German
From Middle High German vriunt, modern German Freund meaning “friend”.
FRIED German
Derived from the given name FRIEDRICH.
FRIEDRICH German
Derived from the given name FRIEDRICH.
FROMM German
From a nickname derived from Middle High German vrom meaning “noble, honourable”.
FROST English, German
From Old English and Old High German meaning “frost”, a nickname for a person who had a cold personality or a white beard.
FUCHS German
From Old High German fuhs meaning “fox”. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
FUHRMANN German
Derived from Middle High German vuorman meaning “cartwright”.
FÜRST German
From a nickname meaning “(sovereign) prince” in German. The word fürst itself is derived from Old High German furisto “first”.
FUX German
Variant of FUCHS.
GABLER German
Occupational name for someone who made or sold forks, from Old High German gabala “fork”.
GAERTNER German
German form of GARDENER.
GARB German
Variant of GARBER.
GARBER German
Variant of GERBER.
GÄRTNER German
German form of GARDENER.
GARVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GASS German
Name for someone who lived on a street in a city, from German gasse.
GEHRIG German
Variant of GEHRING.
GEHRING German
Derived from a short form of Germanic names starting with the element ger “spear”.
GEIER German
Means “vulture” in German, a nickname for a greedy person.
GEIGER German
Means “fiddle player” in German, derived from Old High German giga “fiddle”.
GEISLER German
Variant of GEISSLER.
GEIßLER German
Variant of GEISSLER.
GEISSLER German
Occupational name for a goat herder, from southern German Geiss meaning “goat” and the suffix ler signifying an occupation.
GEISZLER German
Variant of GEISSLER.
GENSCH German
From the given name Gensch, a Sorbian form of JOHN.
GERBER German
Means “tanner, leather dresser” in German, derived from Old High German garawen meaning “to prepare”.
GERHARD German
Derived from the given name GERHARD.
GERHARDT German
Derived from the given name GERHARD.
GERIG German
Variant of GEHRING.
GERST German
Occupational name for a barley farmer, derived from Old High German gersta “barley”.
GERSTLE German
Variant of GERST.
GERVER German
Variant of GERBER.
GIEHL German
German form of GILES.
GIESE German, Danish
Derived from a short form of the given name GISELBERT or other Germanic names beginning with the element gisil.
GLAS German, Dutch
German and Dutch cognate of GLASS.
GLASS English, German
From Old English glæs or Old High German glas meaning “glass”. This was an occupational name for a glass blower or glazier.
GLÖCKNER German
Derived from Middle High German glocke “bell”. It may have referred to a person who worked at or lived close to a bell tower.
GÖBEL German
Derived from the given name Göbel, a diminutive of the Old German name Godebert, which is derived from god “God” and beraht “bright”.
GOEBEL German
Variant of GÖBEL.
GOLDSCHMIDT German
Occupational name meaning “goldsmith” in German.
GORMAN (1) German
From the Germanic given name GERMUND.
GOTT German
Derived from the Germanic given name GODA (1).
GOTTI German
Variant of GOTT.
GOTTLIEB German
Derived from the given name GOTTLIEB.
GOTTSCHALK German
Derived from the given name GOTTSCHALK.
GRAF German
From the German noble title Graf meaning “count”, ultimately from Greek γραφεύς (grapheus) meaning “scribe”.
GRANER German
Originally denoted a person from Gran, the German name for Esztergom, a city in northern Hungary.
GREENBERG German, Jewish
Anglicized form of GRÜNBERG.
GROOS German
Variant of GROß.
GROSS German
Variant of GROß.
GROß German
From Old High German groz meaning “tall, big”.
GROßE German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSE German
Variant of GROß.
GRÖßEL German
Variant of GROß, used in southern Germany.
GROßEL German
Variant of GROß, used in southern Germany.
GROßER German
Variant of GROß.
GROSSER German
Variant of GROß.
GRUBER Upper German
From German Grube meaning “pit”, indicating a person who lived or worked in a pit or depression. This is the most common surname in Austria.
GRÜNBERG German, Jewish
From German grün “green” and Berg “mountain”. This name indicated a person who lived on or near a forest-covered mountain.
GRÜNEWALD German
Means “green forest” from German grün “green” and Wald “forest”.
GÜNTHER German
Derived from the given name GÜNTHER.
GUNTHER German
Derived from the given name GÜNTHER.
GUTERMUTH German
Derived from Middle High German guot meaning “good” and muot meaning “mind, spirit”. It was a nickname for an optimistic person.
GWERDER German (Swiss)
From Swiss German gwerig meaning “agile, alert”.
HAAS Dutch, German
Variant of HASE.
HAASE German
Variant of HASE.
HABER German, Jewish
Occupational name for one who grew or sold oats, derived from Old High German habaro “oat”. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
HABERKORN German
Occupational name for a dealer in oats, derived from Old High German habaro “oat” and korn “kernel, grain”.
HABICH German
German cognate of HAWK.
HABICHT German
German cognate of HAWK.
HAFNER German
Occupational name for a potter, derived from Old High German havan “pot, vessel”.
HAHN German
From a nickname for a proud or pugnacious person, from Old High German hano meaning “rooster, cock”.
HALL English, German, Danish, Norwegian, Swedish
Means simply “hall”, given to one who either lived in or worked in a hall (the house of a medieval noble).
HALLE German
German variant of HALL.
HARTMANN German
From the German given name HARTMANN.
HASE German
From Middle High German and Middle Low German hase meaning “hare, rabbit”. This was a nickname for a person who was quick or timid.
HASENKAMP German
From a northern German place name meaning “rabbit field”, from Old Saxon haso “hare” and kamp “field” (from Latin campus).
HASS German
From the given name HASSO.
HAUER German
Derived from Middle High German houwen “to chop”, referring to a butcher or woodchopper.
HAUMANN German
Derived from Middle High German houwen “to chop” and man “man”, referring to a butcher or woodchopper.
HAUPT German
German cognate of HEAD.
HÄUSLER German
Name for someone who lived in a house with no land, derived rom Old High German word hus meaning “house”.
HAVENER German
Variant of HAFNER.
HEIDRICH German
From the Germanic given name HEIDRICH.
HEINRICH German
Derived from the given name HEINRICH.
HEINRICHS German
Derived from the given name HEINRICH.
HEINTZE German
Derived from a diminutive of HEINRICH.
HEINZ German
Derived from a diminutive of HEINRICH.
HENNIG German
From a diminutive of the given name HEINRICH.
HEPPENHEIMER German
From the name of the city of Heppenheim in Hesse, Germany.
HERBERT English, German, French
Derived from the male given name HERBERT.
HERMANN German
From the given name HERMANN.
HERRMANN German
From the given name HERMANN.
HERSCH German, Jewish
Variant of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2).
HERSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2). A famous bearer was the British-German astronomer William Herschel (1738-1822), as well as his sister Caroline Herschel (1750-1848) and son John Herschel (1792-1871), also noted scientists.
HERTZ German
Derived from Middle High German herze meaning “heart”, a nickname for a big-hearted person.
HERZOG German
From a German title meaning “duke”, a nickname for a person who either acted like a duke or worked in a duke’s household.
HIEDLER German
From southern German Hiedl meaning “underground stream”.
HILDEBRAND German
From the given name HILDEBRAND.
HINTZEN German
Means “son of Hintz”, a diminutive of HEINRICH.
HIRSCH (1) German
Means “deer, hart” in German. This was a nickname for a person who resembled a deer in some way, or who raised or hunted deer.
HIRSCHEL German, Jewish
Diminutive form of HIRSCH (1) or HIRSCH (2).
HITLER German
Variant of HIEDLER. This was spelling used by Alois Hitler, the father of German dictator Adolph Hitler (1889-1945), when he adopted his stepfather Johann Georg Hiedler’s surname.
HOCH German
Means “tall” in German.
HOCHBERG German, Jewish
From place names meaning “high hill” in German.
HOEFLER German
Variant of HOFER.
HOFER German
Occupational name for a farmer, from German Hof “farm”, from Old High German hof “house, estate, courtyard”.
HOFFMAN German
Variant of HOFFMANN.
HOFFMANN German
From Middle High German hofmann meaning “farmer”.
HÖFLER German
Variant of HOFER.
HOFMANN German
Variant of HOFFMANN.
HOFMEISTER German
Means “master of the household”, from Old High German hof “house, estate, courtyard” and meistar “master” (from Latin magister).
HOLLAND (2) Dutch, German, English
Indicated a person from the Dutch province of HOLLAND (1).
HOLTZ German
German cognate of HOLT.
HÖLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZER German
German cognate of HOLT.
HOLZKNECHT German
Occupational name for a forester’s helper, from Old High German holz “wood” and kneht “servant, apprentice”.
HOLZMANN German
Derived from Old High German holz “wood” and man “man”, a name for someone who lived close to a wood or worked with wood.
HOOVER German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of HUBER.
HORN English, German, Norwegian, Danish
From the Germanic word horn meaning “horn”. This was an occupational name for one who carved objects out of horn or who played a horn, or a person who lived near a horn-shaped geographical feature, such as a mountain or a bend in a river.
HÜBER German
Variant of HUBER.
HUBER German
Occupational name for a farmer, derived from Old High German huoba “plot of land, farm”.
HUBERT French, German, English
Derived from the given name HUBERT.
HUFFMAN German
Variant of HOFFMANN.
HUFFMANN German
Variant of HOFFMANN.
HUMMEL (1) German, Dutch
Derived from the given name HUMBERT.
HUMMEL (2) German, Dutch
Nickname for a busy person, from Middle Low German and Middle Dutch hommel, Middle High German hummel, all meaning “bee”.
HUTMACHER German
German cognate of HOEDEMAKER.
INGERSLEBEN German
From the name of the town of Ingersleben, Germany, which meant “Inge’s village”.
JAEGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JÄGER German
Means “hunter” in German, from Old High German jagon meaning “to hunt”.
JAGER German
Variant of JÄGER.
JANS Dutch, German
Means “son of JAN (1)”.
JANSON German, Dutch, Swedish, English
Means “son of JAN (1)”.
JANZ German
Means “son of JAN (1)”.
JÖLLENBECK German
From the name of a village in western Germany, itself derived from the name of the Jölle, a small river, combined with Low German beck “stream”.
JUNDT German
Derived from a diminutive of the feminine given name JUDITH.
JUNG (1) German
Means “young” in German, from Middle High German junc.
JUNGE German
Variant of JUNG (1).
KAHLER German
From a nickname derived from German kahl meaning “bald”.
KAISER German
From Middle High German keiser meaning “emperor”, originally a nickname applied to someone who acted kingly. The title ultimately derives from the Roman name CAESAR.
KALB German
Occupational name meaning “calf (animal)” in German.
KALBFLEISCH German
Occupational name for a butcher who dealt in veal, from German kalb meaning “calf” and fleisch meaning “meat”.
KAPPEL German, Dutch
Name for a person who lived near or worked at a chapel, ultimately from Late Latin cappella, a diminutive of cappa “cape”, arising from the holy relic of the torn cape of Saint Martin, which was kept in small churches.
KARL German
From the given name KARL.
KASPAR German
Derived from the given name KASPAR.
KÄSTNER German
Means “cabinet maker”, derived from Middle High German kaste “box”.
KAUBE German
From the name of the town of Kaub in Germany.
KÄUFER German
Variant of KAUFER.
KAUFER German
Means “trader” in German.
KAUFFMANN German, Jewish
Variant of KAUFMANN.
KAUFMAN German, Jewish
Variant of KAUFMANN.
KAUFMANN German, Jewish
Means “trader, merchant” in German.
KEIL German
Means “wedge shaped” in German. It was used to denote a person who owned a wedge-shaped piece of land.
KELLER German
Means “cellar” in German, an occupational name for one in charge of the food and drink.
KEMPF German
German cognate of KEMP.
KERNER German
Derived from Old High German kerno “seed”, an occupational name for one who sold or planted seeds.
KERPER German
Variant of GERBER.
KIEFER (1) German
Means “pine tree” in German.
KIEFER (2) German
Occupational name for a barrel maker, derived from Old High German kuofa meaning “barrel”.
KIRCH German
German cognate of CHURCH.
KIRCHNER German
Derived from Middle High German kirchenaere meaning “sexton”.
KISTLER German
Occupational name meaning “chest maker, cabinetmaker” from Middle High German kiste.
KISTNER German
Variant of KISTLER.
KLEIN German, Dutch, Jewish
Means “small, little” from German klein or Yiddish kleyn. A famous bearer of this name is clothes designer Calvin Klein (1942-).
KLOSSNER German
Derived from German Klausner, Middle High German klosenære meaning “hermit”.
KNEF German
Occupational name for a shoemaker, derived from Low German knif meaning “shoemaker’s knife”.
KNEIB German
Variant of KNEF.
KNELLER German
Originally a nickname for a noisy or disruptive person, derived from Old German knellen “to make noise, to cause a disturbance”.
KNEPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KNOCHENMUS German
From German Knochen “bone” and Mus “sauce”. It probably referred to someone who worked in the butcher trade.
KNOPF German
Means “button” in German, originally belonging to a button maker or button seller.
KNOPP German
Variant of KNOPF.
KOCH German
German cognate of COOK.
KOENIG German
German cognate of KING.
KOENIGSMANN German
Variant of KÖNIGSMANN.
KÖHL German
Variant of KOHL.
KOHL German
Derived from Middle High German kol “cabbage”.
KÖHLER German
Variant of KOHLER.
KOHLER German
From Middle High German koler meaning “charcoal burner” or “charcoal seller”.
KOLBE German
From Middle High German kolbe meaning “club”.
KÖNIG German
German cognate of KING.
KÖNIGSMANN German
Means “king’s man”, or someone who played a king in a play.
KOPP German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name JAKOB.
KRAEMER German
Variant of KRÄMER.
KRÄMER German
Means “shopkeeper, merchant” in German, derived from Old High German kram meaning “tent, trading post”.
KRANTZ German, Jewish
Variant of KRANZ.
KRANZ German, Jewish
Derived from Old High German kranz meaning “wreath”, an occupational name for a maker of wreaths or an ornamental Jewish name.
KRAUS German
From Middle High German krus meaning “curly”, originally a nickname for a person with curly hair.
KRAUSE German
Variant of KRAUS.
KRAUSS German
Variant of KRAUS.
KRAUß German
Variant of KRAUS.
KREBS German
Means “crab” in German, perhaps a nickname for a person with a crab-like walk.
KRÖGER German
Variant of KRÜGER (1) and KRÜGER (2).
KRON German, Swedish
From German Krone and Swedish krona meaning “crown” (from Latin corona), perhaps a nickname for one who worked in a royal household.
KRÜCKEL German
Nickname for a crippled person or someone who walked with a cane, from Middle High German krücke meaning “cane”.
KRÜGER (1) German
In northern Germany an occupational name for a tavern keeper, derived from Middle Low German kroch meaning “tavern”.
KRÜGER (2) German
In southern Germany an occupational name for a potter, derived from Middle High German kruoc meaning “jug, pot”.
KRUGER German
Variant of KRÜGER (1) and KRÜGER (2).
KRUSE German
Variant of KRAUS.
KÜCHLER German
Occupational surname for a baker who made small cakes or cookies, derived from Middle High German kuoche “cake, pastry”.
KUHN German
Derived from a diminutive of the German given name KONRAD.
KUNDERT German
Derived from the given name KONRAD.
KUNKEL German
Occupational name for a maker of distaffs, from Middle High German kunkel “distaff, spindle”, of Latin origin.
KUNKLE German
Variant of KUNKEL.
KUNTZ German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name KONRAD.
KUNZ German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name KONRAD.
KUNZE German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name KONRAD.
KURZ German
Means “short” in German, ultimately from Latin curtus.
KURZMANN German
Means “short man” in German.
LAFRENTZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LAFRENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LANDAU German, Jewish
Derived from the town of Landau in the Palatinate region of Germany, of Old High German origin meaning “land valley”.
LANG German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of LONG.
LANGE German, Danish, Norwegian
German, Danish and Norwegian cognate of LONG.
LANGENBERG German, Dutch
From various place names meaning “long mountain” in German and Dutch.
LANGER German, Jewish
German cognate of LONG.
LAURENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LAWRENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LEHMANN German
From Middle High German lehenman meaning “vassal, liege man”.
LEHR German
From Old High German loh meaning “meadow, clearing”.
LEITNER German
Referred to one who lived on a hillside, from Middle High German lite “slope”.
LEITZ German
Derived from the archaic given name Leutz, a variant of LUTZ.
LEITZKE German
Either from Leitzkau, the name of a town in Saxony-Anhalt, or from a diminutive of the given name Leutz, a variant of LUTZ.
LENZ German
From a nickname meaning “springtime” in German.
LEVERENZ German (Anglicized)
Americanized form of LEWERENZ.
LEWERENTZ German
Variant of LEWERENZ.
LEWERENZ German
From a northern German form of the given name LORENZ.
LINDEN German
Derived from Old High German linta meaning “linden tree”.
LOEWE German
Variant of LÖWE.
LOHRENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LORENTZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LORENZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LORIS German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LORITZ German
Derived from the given name LORENZ.
LÖWE German, Jewish
Means “lion” in German.
LUDWIG German
From the given name LUDWIG.
LUTHER German
From the old given name LEUTHAR.
MAIER (1) German
Variant of MEYER (1).
MANDEL German, Yiddish
Means “almond” in German, an occupational name for a grower or seller, or a topographic name for a person who lived near an almond tree. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
MANGOLD German
From the given name MANAGOLD.
MANN German, English
From a nickname meaning “man”. This may have originally been given in order to distinguish the bearer from a younger person with the same name.
MANZ German
From a diminutive of the given name MANAGOLD.
MARKWARDT German
Variant of MARQUARDT.
MARQUARDT German
From Old High German marka “border, boundary” and wart “protector”. This was an occupational name for a border guard.
MARTIN English, French, German, Czech
Derived from the given name MARTIN.
MARTZ German
Derived from an old diminutive of MARTIN.
MAURER German
Occupational name meaning “wall builder” in German.
MAUS German
From a nickname meaning “mouse”, from Old High German mus.
MAYER (1) German
Variant of MEYER (1).
MEIER (1) German
Variant of MEYER (1).
MEIN German
Derived from the given name MEINO.
MEINDL German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name MEINO.
MEINHARDT German
Derived from the given name MEINHARD.
MEISNER German
Variant of MEISSNER.
MEISSNER German
Originally denoted a person from the German town of Meissen, which is probably of Slavic origin.
MELSBACH German
From the name of a German town, possibly meaning “mill stream”.
MENDEL (2) German
Derived from a diminutive of the given name MEINO. A famous bearer was Gregor Mendel (1822-1884), a Czech monk and scientist who did experiments in genetics.
MERKEL German
From a diminutive of the given name MARKUS. A notable bearer is the German chancellor Angela Merkel (1954-).
MESSER German
Occupational name for a person who made knives, from Middle High German messer “knife”.
MESSERLI German (Swiss)
Swiss diminutive form of MESSER.
MESSMANN German
Variant of MESSER.
MESSNER German
Occupational name for a sexton or churchwarden, from Old High German mesinari.
METZ (1) German
Occupational name for maker of knives, from Middle High German metze “knife”.
METZ (2) German
Derived from Mätz, a diminutive of the given name MATTHIAS.
METZGER German
Means “butcher” in German.
MEYER (1) German
From Middle High German meier meaning “bailiff, administrator”, derived from Latin maior meaning “greater”. Later it also denoted a tenant farmer. The spellings Meier and Meyer are more common in northern Germany while Maier and Mayer are more common in southern Germany.
MICHEL French, German, Dutch, Basque
Derived from the given name MICHEL, MICHIEL or MITXEL.
MOHREN German
Derived from the given name MAURUS.
MORGENSTERN German, Jewish
Ornamental name meaning “morning star” in German.
MOSER German
Name for someone who lived near a peat bog, from Middle High German mos.
MOUNCE German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of German MANZ.
MUELLER German
Variant of MÜLLER.
MUHLFELD German
Means “mill field” German.
MÜLLER German
German equivalent of MILLER, derived from Middle High German mülnære or müller.
MULLER German
Variant of MÜLLER.
NAGEL German, Dutch
Means “nail” in German and Dutch, an occupational name for a carpenter or nailsmith.
NEUMAN German, Jewish
Variant of NEUMANN.
NEUMANN German, Jewish
From Middle High German niuwe and man meaning “new man, newcomer”.
NUREMBERG German
Derived from the name of a city in Bavaria, Germany.
NUSSBAUM German, Jewish
Means “nut tree”, derived from the German Nuss “nut” and Baum “tree”.
OBERST German
From Old High German obar meaning “above, upper”, indicating a person from the uppermost end of a village or the top of a house.
OELBERG German
Means “oil hill” from Middle High German öl “oil” and berg “mountain, hill”.
OHME German
From Middle High German oem meaning “maternal uncle”.
OLIVER English, Catalan, German, French
Derived from the given name OLIVER.
OPPENHEIMER German
Originally indicated a person from Oppenheim, Germany, perhaps meaning “marshy home”.
OTT English, German
From the given name OTTO.
OTTO German
From the given name OTTO.
OURSLER German
Originally a name designating a person from Ursel (now Oberursel) in Hesse, Germany.
PABST German
From German Papst, a cognate of POPE.
PAHLKE German
Low German cognate of PEEL.
PAPP (2) German
Nickname perhaps related to Late Latin pappare meaning “to eat”.
PAUL English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name PAUL.
PAWLITZKI German
From the given name PAUL.
PETER English, German, Dutch
Derived from the given name PETER.
PETERS English, German, Dutch
Means “son of PETER”.
PFAFF German
From a nickname meaning “priest, cleric” from Old High German pfaffo, from Latin papa.
PFEIFFER German
Occupational name meaning “pipe player” in German, from Middle High German pfifen “to whistle”.
PFENNING German
From Old High German pfenning meaning “penny, coin”. It was used in reference to feudal tax obligations.
PICHLER Upper German
From Bavarian Bühel meaning “hill”.
PLANCK German
German variant of PLANK.
PLANK German, English
Means “plank”, from Old French, itself from Late Latin planca. This could have referred to a person who lived by a plank bridge over a stream, someone who was thin, or a carpenter.
PLETCHER German
Anglicized form of PLETSCHER.
PLETSCHER German
Possibly from the name of a field where cattle fodder was grown, from German Bletsch.
POHL (2) German
From the given name PAUL.
POLZIN German
From the name of a town in Pomerania, Poland (formerly part of Germany). In Polish it is called Połczyn.
PORSCHE German
Derived from the given name BORIS.
POST Dutch, German, English
Indicated a person who lived near a post, ultimately from Latin postis.
PRINZ German, Jewish
Means “prince”, used as an ornamental name by Jews or as a nickname for someone who acted in a princely manner.
PROTZ German
From a nickname meaning “showy, pompous”, derived from an old southern German word meaning “toad”.
RAPP (2) German
From Middle High German raben meaning “raven”, a nickname for a person with black hair.
RASCH German
German form of RASK.
RASKOB German
Variant of RASKOPF.
RASKOP German
Variant of RASKOPF.
RASKOPF German
Possibly from German rasch “quick” and Kopf “head”.
REGENBOGEN German, Jewish
From a German nickname meaning “rainbow”.
REIER German
Variant of REIHER.
REIHER German
Means “heron” in German, a nickname for a person with long legs.
REIS German, Jewish
From Middle High German ris meaning “twig, branch, bush”, denoting a person who lived in an overgrown area. As a Jewish name it is ornamental.
REITER German
Variant of REUTER (1).
RETTIG German
Derived from Middle High German retich, Middle Low German redik meaning “radish”, an occupational name for a grower or seller of radishes.
REUTER (1) German
Fom Middle High German riute meaning “cleared land”.
REUTER (2) German
From Middle High German riutœre meaning “highwayman, thief”.
REYER German
Variant of REIHER.
RICHARD English, French, German, Dutch
From the given name RICHARD.
RICHTER German
Means “judge” in German, from Middle High German rihtære.
RIESE German, Jewish
Means “giant” in German.
RITTER German
From Middle High German riter meaning “rider, knight”, a cognate of RYDER.
ROSE (1) English, French, German, Jewish
Means “rose” from Middle English, Old French and Middle High German rose, all from Latin rosa. All denote a person of a rosy complexion or a person who lived in an area abundant with roses. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental, from Yiddish רויז (roiz).
ROSENBERG German, Swedish, Jewish
Means “rose mountain” in German and Swedish. As a Swedish and Jewish name it is ornamental.
ROSENBERGER German, Jewish
Variant of ROSENBERG.
ROSENFELD German, Jewish
Means “field of roses” in German. As a Jewish surname it is ornamental.
ROT German, Jewish
Variant of ROTH.
ROTH German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning “red”. It was originally a nickname for a person with red hair.
ROTHBAUER German
From Old High German riuten “to clear land” and bur “peasant, farmer”.
ROTHENBERG German, Jewish
From Middle High German rot meaning “red” and berg meaning “mountain”. As a Jewish name it may be ornamental.
RYER German (Anglicized)
Possibly an Americanized form of REIHER.
SACHS German
Originally indicated a person from Saxony (German Sachsen). The region was named for the Germanic tribe of the Saxons, ultimately derived from the Germanic word sahs meaning “knife”.
SALLER (1) German
Originally denoted a person from the town of Sallern in Bavaria, possibly from a Celtic element meaning “stream”.
SALLER (2) German
Denoted a person who lived by a prominent sallow tree, from Middle High German salhe “sallow tree”.
SALZWEDEL German
Originally denoted a person from Salzwedel, Germany, which is of Old Saxon origin meaning “salt ford”.
SAMUEL English, French, German, Jewish
Derived from the given name SAMUEL.
SANDER German, Danish
Derived from the given name ALEXANDER.
SAUBER German
Means “clean, tidy” in German.
SAUER German
Means “sour” in German, a nickname for an embittered or cantankerous person.
SAUTER German
Occupational name for a cobbler, from Latin sutor “sewer, cobbler”.
SCHÄFER German
From Old High German scaphare meaning “shepherd”.
SCHEER German
Variant of SCHERER.
SCHENCK German
Variant of SCHENK.
SCHENK German, Dutch
From Middle High German, Middle Dutch schenke meaning “wine server” (from Old High German scenken “to pour out”).
SCHERER German
Occupational name for a cutter of cloth or a sheep-shearer, from Old High German skeran “to cut”.
SCHINDLER German
Occupational name for a roof tiler, from Middle High German schindel “shingle”. A famous bearer was Oskar Schindler (1908-1974), who saved over a thousand Polish Jews during World War II.
SCHIRMER German
Means “fencer, fencing master”, from Old High German skirmen meaning “to defend”.
SCHLENDER German
From Middle High German slinderen “to dawdle” or Middle Low German slinden “to swallow, to eat”.
SCHLIMME German
From German schlimm “bad, crooked, awry”.
SCHLÖSSER German
Variant of SCHLOSSER.
SCHLOSSER German
Occupational name for a locksmith, derived from Old High German sloz meaning “lock”.
SCHMELING German
From Middle Low German smal meaning “small, slender”.
SCHMID German
Variant of SCHMIDT.
SCHMIDT German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German smit “smith, metalworker”, a cognate of SMITH.
SCHMITT German
Variant of SCHMIDT.
SCHMITZ German
Variant of SCHMIDT, originating in the Rhine area in western Germany.
SCHNEIDER German, Jewish
From German schneider or Yiddish shnayder, making it a cognate of SNYDER.
SCHNELL German
German cognate of SNELL.
SCHNOOR German
Variant of SCHNUR.
SCHNUR German, Jewish
From Old High German snuor meaning “rope, cord”, an occupational name for a maker of rope.
SCHOLZ German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHÖTTMER German
Originally indicated a person from Schötmar, Germany (now part of the city of Bad Salzuflen in North Rhine-Westphalia).
SCHRECK German
From Middle High German schrecken meaning “to frighten, to scare”.
SCHREIBER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SCHREIER German, Jewish
Occupational name for a town crier, from Old High German scrian meaning “to shout, to yell”.
SCHRÖDER (2) German
Variant of SCHRÖTER.
SCHROEDER German
Variant of SCHRÖDER (1) and SCHRÖDER (2).
SCHROETER German
Variant of SCHRÖTER.
SCHRÖTER German
Means “beer-porter, wine-porter” in German, an occupational name for a carrier of wine or beer barrels.
SCHUBERT German
Variant of SCHUCHARDT.
SCHUCHARD German
Variant of SCHUCHARDT.
SCHUCHARDT German
From Middle High German schuochwürte meaning “shoemaker, cobbler”.
SCHUCHERT German
Variant of SCHUCHARDT.
SCHUHART German
Variant of SCHUCHARDT.
SCHUHMACHER German
From the Middle High German occupational name schuochmacher meaning “shoemaker”.
SCHULER German
Means “scholar, student” in German, ultimately from Latin schola meaning “school”.
SCHULTES German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEIS German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEISS German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTHEIß German
Occupational name derived from Middle High German schultheiße meaning “mayor, judge”.
SCHULTZ German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULTZE German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULZ German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHULZE German
Variant of SCHULTHEIß.
SCHUMACHER German
Variant of SCHUHMACHER.
SCHUSTER German
Means “shoemaker, cobbler”, from Middle High German schuoch “shoe” and suter, from Latin sutor “sewer, cobbler”.
SCHÜTTMANN German
Means “watchman, guard” from Middle High German schützen “to protect”.
SCHWANGAU German
From the name of a town in southern Germany, possibly related to German Schwan meaning “swan”.
SCHWARTZ German, Jewish
Variant of SCHWARZ.
SCHWARZ German, Jewish
Means “black” in German, from Old High German swarz. It originally described a person with black hair or a dark complexion.
SCHWARZENBERG German
Means “black mountain” in German.
SCHWARZENEGGER German
From a place name, derived from Old High German swarz meaning “black” and ecka meaning “edge, corner”. A famous bearer of this name is actor and politician Arnold Schwarzenegger (1947-).
SCHWEITZER German
Indicated a person from Switzerland (see SCHWEIZ).
SCHWENKE (1) German
Derived from Middle High German swenken meaning “to swing”.
SCHWENKE (2) German
From a given name, a Low German diminutive of SWANHILD.
SCHWINGHAMMER German
Occupational name for a blacksmith, literally meaning “swing hammer” in German.
SEEGER German
From the given name SIEGHARD.
SEIDEL German
From a diminutive of the given name SIEGFRIED.
SENFT (1) German
Occupational name for a mustard seller, from German Senf “mustard”.
SENFT (2) German
Nickname for a helpful, kind person, from Old High German semfti meaning “soft, accommodating”.
SHRIVER German
German cognate of SCRIVEN.
SIEBERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGBERT.
SIEGEL (1) German
Occupational name for a maker of seals or signet rings, ultimately from Latin sigillum “seal”.
SIEGEL (2) German
Derived from the diminutive of Germanic given names beginning with the element sigu meaning “victory”.
SIEGER German
From the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEGERT German
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEKERT German (Rare)
Derived from the given name SIEGHARD.
SIEMON German
Variant of SIMON.
SIMMON German
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMON English, French, German, Dutch, Hungarian, Jewish
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONEIT German
From the given name SIMON (1).
SIMONS English, German
Derived from the given name SIMON (1).
SITZ (1) German
Derived from a given name beginning with the Germanic element sigu meaning “victory”.
SITZ (2) German
Means “house owner”, derived from Old High German siz “seat, domicile”.
SLUSSER German
Variant of SCHLOSSER.
SOMMER (1) German, English
Means “summer”, from Old High German sumar or Old English sumor. This was a nickname for a cheerful person, someone who lived in a sunny spot, or a farmer who had to pay taxes in the summer.
SOMMER (2) German
From Middle High German sumber or sommer meaning “basket, wickerwork, drum”.
SONNEN German
Means “sun” from Middle High German sunne. It probably denoted someone of cheerful temperament or a person who lived in a sunny area.

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