Accent vs Brogue what difference

what is difference between Accent and Brogue

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English accent, from Middle French accent, from Old French acent, from Latin accentus, past participle of accinō (sing to, sing along). The word accent had been borrowed into Old English already, but was lost and reborrowed in Middle English.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ăkʹsənt, IPA(key): /ˈak.sənt/
  • (US) enPR: ăkʹsĕnt, IPA(key): /ˈæk.sɛnt/

Noun

accent (countable and uncountable, plural accents)

  1. (linguistics) A higher-pitched or stronger articulation of a particular syllable of a word or phrase in order to distinguish it from the others or to emphasize it.
  2. (figuratively) Emphasis or importance in general.
  3. (orthography) A mark or character used in writing, in order to indicate the place of the spoken accent, or to indicate the nature or quality of the vowel marked.
  4. Modulation of the voice in speaking; the manner of speaking or pronouncing; a peculiar or characteristic modification of the voice, expressing emotion; tone.
    • 1608, William Shakespeare, King Lear, II-ii
      I know, sir, I am no flatterer: he that beguiled you in a plain accent was a plain knave; which for my part I will not be, though I should win your displeasure to entreat me to ‘t.
    • 1696, Matthew Prior, “From Celia to Damon”, in Poems on Several Occasions
      The tender Accent of a Woman’s Cry / Will pass unheard, will unregarded die;
  5. (linguistics, sociolinguistics) The distinctive manner of pronouncing a language associated with a particular region, social group, etc., whether of a native speaker or a foreign speaker; the phonetic and phonological aspects of a dialect.
  6. (linguistics, sign languages) A distinctive manner of producing a sign language, such as someone who does not normally use a certain sign language might have when using it.
    • 2015 December 3, [./http://www.pri.org/stories/2015-12-03/philadelphia-accent-sign-language There’s a distinctly Philadelphia accent in American Sign Language]
  7. A word; a significant tone or sound.
  8. (usually plural only) Expressions in general; speech.
    • Winds! on your wings to Heaven her accents bear, / Such words as Heaven alone is fit to hear.
  9. (prosody, poetry) Stress laid on certain syllables of a verse.
  10. (music) A regularly recurring stress upon the tone to mark the beginning, and, more feebly, the third part of the measure.
  11. (music) A special emphasis of a tone, even in the weaker part of the measure.
  12. (music) The rhythmical accent, which marks phrases and sections of a period.
  13. (music) The expressive emphasis and shading of a passage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of J. S. Dwight to this entry?)
  14. (music) A mark used to represent specific stress on a note.
  15. (mathematics) A mark placed at the right hand of a letter, and a little above it, to distinguish magnitudes of a similar kind expressed by the same letter, but differing in value, as y’, y”.
  16. (geometry) A mark at the right hand of a number, indicating minutes of a degree, seconds, etc., as in 12′ 27”, meaning twelve minutes and twenty-seven seconds.
  17. (engineering) A mark used to denote feet and inches, as in 6′ 10”, meaning six feet ten inches.
  18. Emphasis laid on a part of an artistic design or composition; an emphasized detail, in particular a detail in sharp contrast to its surroundings.
  19. A very small gemstone set into a piece of jewellery.
  20. A distinctive feature or quality.
  21. (archaic) Utterance.

Usage notes

The word “accent” is often used specifically to refer to manners of speech that differ significantly from the local standard or one’s personal speech.

Derived terms
Translations

See also

  • circumflex

References

  • “Accent, sb.” on pages 50–51 of § 1 (A) of volume I (A–B, ed. James Augustus Henry Murray?, 1888) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (1st ed.)
  • “accent, n.” in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd ed., 1989)

Etymology 2

From Middle French accenter, from Old French accenter, from Latin accentō, from accentus.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: ăk-sĕntʹ, IPA(key): /ækˈsɛnt/
  • (US) enPR: ăk-sĕntʹ, ăkʹsĕnt, IPA(key): /ækˈsɛnt/, /ˈæk.sɛnt/

Verb

accent (third-person singular simple present accents, present participle accenting, simple past and past participle accented)

  1. (transitive) To express the accent of vocally; to utter with accent.
  2. (transitive) To mark emphatically; to emphasize; to accentuate; to make prominent.
  3. (transitive) To mark with written accents.
Translations

References

  • “Accent, v.” on page 51/3 of § 1 (A) of volume I (A–B, ed. James Augustus Henry Murray?, 1888) of A New English Dictionary on Historical Principles (1st ed.)
  • “accent, v.” in the Oxford English Dictionary (2nd ed., 1989)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin accentus.

Noun

accent m (plural accents)

  1. accent

Derived terms

  • accent agut
  • accent greu

Related terms

  • accentuar

Further reading

  • “accent” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Danish

Etymology 1

From French accentus, from Latin accentus, a calque of Ancient Greek προσῳδία (prosōidía, prosody, accent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɑɡ̊ˈsɑŋ]

Noun

accent c (singular definite accenten, plural indefinite accenter)

  1. accent (a voice influenced by dialect or another language)
  2. accent (a mark on a letter (like grave or acute))
Inflection

Etymology 2

From Latin accentus, a calque of Ancient Greek προσῳδία (prosōidía, prosody, accent).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɑɡ̊ˈsɛnˀd̥]

Noun

accent c (singular definite accenten, plural indefinite accenter)

  1. (linguistics) accent (stress or a pitch in articulation)
  2. accent (emphasis)
  3. accent (a mark on a letter (like grave or acute))
Inflection

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch accent, ultimately from Latin accentus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɑkˈsɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: ac‧cent
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

accent n (plural accenten, diminutive accentje n)

  1. (linguistics) accent (distinctive pronunciation of a language; phonetic and phonological aspects of a lect)
  2. A notably deviant or disprivileged pronunciation of a language.
  3. (linguistics) accent (contrasting articulation to express emphasis)
  4. (orthography) accent (symbol to indicate spoken accent or the nature of a vowel)
    Synonym: accentteken
  5. (music) accent (stress or emphasis)
  6. (music) A mark that indicates musical accent.
    Synonym: accentteken

Derived terms

  • accentteken

Related terms

  • accentueren

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: aksent
  • Indonesian: aksen

French

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.) 

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ak.sɑ̃/

Noun

accent m (plural accents)

  1. accent, manner or tone of speech
  2. (linguistics) an accent symbol
  3. (linguistics) accent, stress
  4. (music) strain, section

Derived terms

  • accent aigu
  • accent circonflexe
  • accent grave
  • mettre l’accent sur

Descendants

  • Norwegian Bokmål: accent
  • Turkish: aksan

Further reading

  • “accent” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

From Old French acent, from Latin accentus, from ad + cantus (song).

Noun

accent m (plural accents)

  1. (linguistics) accent, stress

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French accent (accent, manner or tone of speech), from Middle French accent, from Old French acent, from Latin accentus (accent, tone, accentuation), past participle of accinō (sing to, sing along), from ad- +‎ canō (sing), a calque of Ancient Greek προσῳδία (prosōidía, song sung to music; pronunciation of syllable), from πρός (prós, to) + ᾠδή (ōidḗ, song)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /akˈsaŋ/
  • Rhymes: -aŋ
  • Hyphenation: ac‧cent
  • Homophone: aksent

Noun

accent

  1. Alternative spelling of aksent (accent)
  2. Only used in accent aigu (acute accent)
  3. Only used in accent circonflexe (circumflex)
  4. Only used in accent grave (grave accent)

References

  • “accent” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Old English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin accentus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɑk.kent/

Noun

accent m

  1. (phonology) accent

Declension

References

  • John R. Clark Hall (1916) , “accent”, in A Concise Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, New York: Macmillan.
  • Joseph Bosworth and T. Northcote Toller (1898) , “accent”, in An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Romanian

Etymology

From French accent

Noun

accent n (plural accente)

  1. emphasis
  2. accent

Declension


Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /a(k)ˈsɛnt/

Noun

accent (plural accents)

  1. accent

Swedish

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin accentus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /akːˈsɛnːt/, /akːˈsaŋː/

Noun

accent c

  1. an accent, an emphasis, a stress (in articulation)
  2. an accent, a mark on a letter (grave or acute)
  3. an accent, a voice influenced by dialect or another language

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: brōg, IPA(key): /bɹoʊɡ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: brōg, IPA(key): /bɹəʊɡ/
  • Rhymes: -əʊɡ

Etymology 1

From Irish bróg (boot, shoe). The “accent” sense may instead be derived from Irish barróg (a hold (on the tongue)).

Noun

brogue (plural brogues)

  1. A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
    • 1978, Louis L’Amour, Fair Blows the Wind, Bantam Books, page 62:
      I had no doubt he knew where I was from, for I had the brogue, although not much of it.
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest, Random House, page 187:
      “No-man’s-land.” The words were spoken in a deep voice filled with salt water and brogue.
  2. A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
  3. (dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
Synonyms
  • (heavy shoe): brogan
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
  2. (intransitive) To walk.
  3. (transitive) To kick.
  4. (transitive) To punch a hole in, as with an awl.

See also

  • Brogue shoe on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Possibly from French brouiller.

Verb

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (dialect) to fish for eels by disturbing the waters.

Anagrams

  • Burgeo

Yola

Etymology

Borrowed from Irish bróg.

Noun

brogue

  1. shoe

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867) , William Barnes, editor, A glossary, with some pieces of verse, of the old dialect of the English colony in the baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, J. Russell Smith, →ISBN

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