Arch vs Arc what difference

what is difference between Arch and Arc

English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: ärch, IPA(key): /ɑɹt͡ʃ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɑːt͡ʃ/
  • (by analogy to arc, nonstandard) IPA(key): ((General American)) /ɑɹ˞k/, ((Received Pronunciation)) /ɑːk/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)tʃ

Etymology 1

From Middle English arch, arche, from Old French arche (an arch) (French arche), a feminine form of arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch).

Noun

arch (plural arches)

  1. An inverted U shape.
  2. An arch-shaped arrangement of trapezoidal stones, designed to redistribute downward force outward.
  3. (architecture) An architectural element having the shape of an arch
  4. Any place covered by an arch; an archway.
    to pass into the arch of a bridge
  5. (archaic, geometry) An arc; a part of a curve.
  6. A natural arch-shaped opening in a rock mass.
  7. (anatomy) Curved part of the bottom of a foot.
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989) , “arch”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN

Verb

arch (third-person singular simple present arches, present participle arching, simple past and past participle arched)

  1. To form into an arch shape
    The cat arched its back
  2. To cover with an arch or arches.
Translations

Etymology 2

From the prefix arch-. “Principal” is the original sense; “mischievous” is via onetime frequent collocation with rogue, knave, etc.

Adjective

arch (comparative archer, superlative archest)

  1. Knowing, clever, mischievous.
    I attempted to hide my emotions, but an arch remark escaped my lips.
    • July 4, 1710, Isaac Bickerstaff (pseudonym for Richard Steele or (in some later numbers of the journal) Joseph Addison), The Tatler No. 193
      [He] spoke his request with so arch a leer.
    • Lassiter ended there with dry humor, yet behind that was meaning. Jane blushed and made arch eyes at him.
  2. Principal; primary.
Derived terms
  • archly
  • archness
Translations

Noun

arch (plural arches)

  1. (obsolete) A chief.

Related terms

  • arc

Further reading

  • arch in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • arch in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • arch at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Char, Rach, char, rach

Czech

Noun

arch m inan

  1. sheet (in printing)

Declension


Middle Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch *arg, from Proto-Germanic *argaz.

Adjective

arch

  1. bad, depraved
  2. wrong, evil
  3. shameful
  4. bad, worthless, of low quality
Inflection

This adjective needs an inflection-table template.

Alternative forms
  • erch
Derived terms
  • argeren
Descendants
  • Dutch: arg, erg

Etymology 2

Substantive form of the adjective arch.

Noun

arch n

  1. evil
  2. disaster, misfortune
Inflection

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • “arch (I)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • “arch (II)”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “arch (I)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page I
  • Verwijs, E.; Verdam, J. (1885–1929) , “arch (II)”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, →ISBN, page II

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • arche

Etymology

From Old French arche.

Noun

arch (plural arches)

  1. arch
  2. arc

Descendants

  • English: arch

References

  • “arch(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Middle Welsh

Etymology

From the root of erchi (to request), from Proto-Celtic *ɸarsketi, from Proto-Indo-European *preḱ-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arχ/

Noun

arch f

  1. request

Verb

arch

  1. second-person singular imperative of erchi

Mutation


Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arχ/

Etymology 1

From Middle Welsh arch, from Proto-Brythonic *arx, from Latin arca.

Noun

arch f (plural eirch)

  1. (obsolete) chest, coffer
  2. coffin (box for the dead)
  3. ark (large boat with a flat bottom)
    • 1588, Y Beibl cyssegr-lan, Genesis 6:13, 14:
Derived terms
  • arch Noa (Noah’s Ark)
  • arch y Cyfamod (Ark of the Covenant)
  • bwa’r arch (rainbow)

Etymology 2

Back-formation from erchi (to seek, to ask for).

Noun

arch f (plural eirchion)

  1. request, command
Derived terms
  • archeb (order)

Etymology 3

Inflected form of erchi (to seek, to ask for).

Verb

arch

  1. second-person singular imperative of erchi

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present) , “arch”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


English

Etymology

From Middle English ark, borrowed from Old French arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch). Doublet of arch and arco.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: äk, IPA(key): /ɑːk/
  • (US) enPR: ärk, IPA(key): /ɑɹk/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)k
  • Homophone: ark

Noun

arc (plural arcs)

  1. (astronomy) That part of a circle which a heavenly body appears to pass through as it moves above and below the horizon. [from 14th c.]
  2. (geometry) A continuous part of the circumference of a circle (circular arc) or of another curve. [from 16th c.]
  3. A curve, in general. [from 17th c.]
  4. A band contained within parallel curves, or something of that shape. [from 17th c.]
  5. (electrics) A flow of current across an insulating medium; especially a hot, luminous discharge between either two electrodes or as lightning. [from 19th c.]
  6. A story arc. [from 20th c.]
  7. (mathematics) A continuous mapping from a real interval (typically [0, 1]) into a space.
  8. (graph theory) A directed edge.
  9. (basketball, slang) The three-point line.
  10. (film) An arclight.

Synonyms

  • (curve): curve, swoop
  • (circular arc): circular arc, circle segment
  • (directed edge): arrow, directed edge

Derived terms

  • arcweld
  • mercury arc rectifier

Translations

Verb

arc (third-person singular simple present arcs, present participle arcing or arcking, simple past and past participle arced or arcked)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To move following a curved path.
    • 2008, T. R. Elmore, Blood Ties Series, Volume 1, Tainted, Book 1 (page 106)
      A warring bloodhunter detected it and skillfully arced his sword through its spinal column before it could return to follow through with its attack.
  2. (transitive) To shape into an arc; to hold in the form of an arc.
  3. (intransitive) To form an electrical arc.

Related terms

  • arch

Further reading

  • arc in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • arc in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • arc at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • CAR, CRA, Car, RAC, RCA, acr-, car, rac-

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan arc, from Latin arcus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈaɾk/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈark/

Noun

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. (music) bow (used to play string instruments)
  3. (geometry) arc
  4. (architecture) arch

Derived terms

  • arc de Sant Martí
  • arc de triomf
  • arc iris
  • arcada
  • arcbotant
  • arcar
  • arquejar
  • arquer

See also

  • fletxa

Further reading

  • “arc” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “arc” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “arc” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “arc” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

From Old French arc, from Latin arcus (bow, arch), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aʁk/

Noun

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. arc (curve)
  3. (geometry) arc, circular arc, circle segment
  4. (architecture) arch

Derived terms

See also

  • flèche f
  • arche f

Anagrams

  • car

Further reading

  • “arc” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Friulian

Etymology

From Latin arcus.

Noun

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow (weapon)
  2. (architecture) arch

Related terms

  • arcâ

See also

  • frece

Hungarian

Etymology

An archaic compound word of orr (nose) and száj (mouth), via Proto-Finno-Ugric elements. The original form of these two words was or and szá, the compound word orszá. Over time, the final vowel became short (orsza), the sz changed to c (orca), today a poetic or archaic version. The next change was the initial o to a (arca) which felt as a possessive form and later shortened to the current term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɒrt͡s]
  • Rhymes: -ɒrt͡s

Noun

arc (plural arcok)

  1. (anatomy) face

Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • arc in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • arc in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2021)

Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aɾˠk/

Etymology 1

From Old Irish orc, arc (piglet).

Noun

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. piglet
  2. diminutive animal or person
Alternative forms
  • earc
Synonyms
  • arcachán
  • arcadán

Etymology 2

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman arc, from Latin arcus (a bow, arc, arch).

Noun

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. (mathematics, geometry) arc
Derived terms
  • arclampa (arc-lamp)

Etymology 3

Noun

arc m (genitive singular airc, nominative plural airc)

  1. Alternative form of earc (lizard; reptile)

Declension

Mutation

Further reading

  • “arc” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019) , “1 orc (‘young pig’)”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin arcus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /aɾk/

Noun

arc m (plural arcs)

  1. bow
  2. arch, arc

Derived terms


Old French

Etymology

From Latin arcus.

Noun

arc m (oblique plural ars, nominative singular ars, nominative plural arc)

  1. bow (weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string)
  2. (architecture) arch

Coordinate terms

  • (bow): saete

Descendants

  • Middle English: ark, arke
    • English: arc
  • French: arc

Old High German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ark/

Adjective

arc

  1. Alternative form of arg

References

  • Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin arcus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂erkʷo-.

Noun

arc n (plural arcuri)

  1. bow (a weapon)
  2. (architecture) arch

Declension

Noun

arc n (plural arce)

  1. (geometry) arc

Declension

Derived terms

  • arcadă
  • arcan
  • arcatură
  • arcaș
  • arcui
  • arcuibil
  • arcuire
  • arcuit
  • arcuitură
  • arculeț
  • arcuș

Related terms

  • arcar

See also

  • săgeată

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /arxk/

Noun

arc f

  1. Bee (apoidea).
  2. Wasp (vespidae).
  3. Impost, tax.
  4. “Femen.”(sic)

References


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