Archetype vs Stereotype what difference

what is difference between Archetype and Stereotype

English

Etymology

From Old French architipe (modern French archétype), from Latin archetypum (original), from Ancient Greek ἀρχέτυπον (arkhétupon, model, pattern), the neuter form of ἀρχέτυπος (arkhétupos, first-moulded), from ἀρχή (arkhḗ, beginning, origin) (from ἄρχω (árkhō, to begin; to lead, rule), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ergʰ- (to begin; to command, rule)) + τῠ́πος (túpos, blow, pressing; sort, type) (from τύπτω (túptō, to beat, strike), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)tewp- (to push; to stick)).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɑːkɪtaɪp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɑɹkɪtaɪp/
  • Hyphenation: ar‧che‧type

Noun

archetype (plural archetypes)

  1. An original model of which all other similar concepts, objects, or persons are merely copied, derivative, emulated, or patterned; a prototype. [from mid 16th c.]
  2. An ideal example of something; a quintessence.
  3. (literature) A character, object, or story that is based on a known character, object, or story.
  4. (psychology) According to Swiss psychologist Carl Jung: a universal pattern of thought, present in an individual’s unconscious, inherited from the past collective experience of humanity.
  5. (textual criticism) A protograph (original manuscript of a text from which all further copies derive).

Usage notes

Traditionally, archetype refers to the model upon which something is based, but it has also come to mean an example of a personality archetype, particularly a fictional character in a story based on a well-established personality model. In this fashion, a character based on the Jesus archetype might be referred to as a “Jesus archetype”. See eponym for a similar usage conflict.

Synonyms

  • See Thesaurus:model

Derived terms

  • archetypal
  • archetypally
  • archetypical
  • archetypically

Translations

Verb

archetype (third-person singular simple present archetypes, present participle archetyping, simple past and past participle archetyped)

  1. To depict as, model using, or otherwise associate an object or subject with an archetype.

Translations

Further reading

  • archetype on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Latin

Adjective

archetype

  1. vocative masculine singular of archetypus


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French stéréotype. Printing sense is from 1817, the “conventional, formulaic, and oversimplified conception, opinion, or image” sense is recorded from 1922 in Walter Lippmann’s book Public Opinion.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɛ.ɹi.əˌtaɪp/, /ˈstɪə.ɹi.əˌtaɪp/

Noun

stereotype (countable and uncountable, plural stereotypes)

  1. A conventional, formulaic, and often oversimplified or exaggerated conception, opinion, or image of (a person).
    Synonyms: cliché, platitude
  2. (psychology) A person who is regarded as embodying or conforming to a set image or type.
  3. (printing) A metal printing plate cast from a matrix moulded from a raised printing surface.
    Synonym: cliché
  4. (software engineering) An extensibility mechanism of the Unified Modeling Language, allowing a new element to be derived from an existing one with added specializations.

Derived terms

  • stereotypic
  • stereotypical

Translations

Verb

stereotype (third-person singular simple present stereotypes, present participle stereotyping, simple past and past participle stereotyped)

  1. (transitive) To make a stereotype of someone or something, or characterize someone by a stereotype.
  2. (transitive, printing) To prepare for printing in stereotype; to produce stereotype plates of.
  3. (transitive, printing) To print from a stereotype.
  4. (transitive, figuratively) To make firm or permanent; to fix.
    • 1887, George Campbell, 8th Duke of Argyll, Scotland as it was and as it is
      Powerful causes tending to stereotype and aggravate the poverty of old conditions.

Translations

References


Swedish

Adjective

stereotype

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of stereotyp.

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