Assimilate vs Adapt what difference

what is difference between Assimilate and Adapt

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Late Latin assimilātus, variant of Latin assimulātus (made similar, imitated), perfect passive participle of assimulō, from ad + simulō (imitate, copy). Doublet of assemble.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /əˈsɪm.ɪ.leɪt/

Verb

assimilate (third-person singular simple present assimilates, present participle assimilating, simple past and past participle assimilated)

  1. (transitive) To incorporate nutrients into the body, especially after digestion.
    • Hence also it may be that the parts of animals and vegetables preserve their several forms and assimilate their nourishment
  2. (transitive) To incorporate or absorb (knowledge) into the mind.
    • 1850, Charles Merivale, History of the Romans Under the Empire
      His mind had no power to assimilate the lessons.
  3. (transitive) To absorb (a person or people) into a community or culture.
  4. (transitive, rare, used with “to” or “with”) To liken, compare to something similar.
  5. (transitive) To bring to a likeness or to conformity; to cause a resemblance between.
    • March 13, 1866, John Bright, The reform bill on the motion for leave to bring in the bill
      to assimilate our law in respect to the law of Scotland
    • Fast falls a fleecy shower; the downy flakes / Assimilate all objects.
    • 1676, Matthew Hale, Contemplations, Moral and Divine
      it doth , by degrees , assimilate the whole inward Man to this living Principle , and conforms the Life unto it
  6. (intransitive) To become similar.
  7. (intransitive) To be incorporated or absorbed into something.

Synonyms

  • (incorporate or absorb knowledge into the mind): process
  • (absorb a group of people into a community): integrate

Translations

Noun

assimilate

  1. Something that is or has been assimilated.
    • 2012, A. Läuchli, R.L. Bieleski, Inorganic Plant Nutrition, →ISBN, page 83
      the growing root and ectomycorrhizas both act as assimilate sinks

Italian

Verb

assimilate

  1. second-person plural present of assimilare
  2. second-person plural imperative of assimilare

Latin

Verb

assimilāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of assimilō


English

Etymology

From Middle French adapter, from Latin adaptare (to fit to), from ad (to) + aptare (to make fit), from aptus (fit); see apt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əˈdæpt/
  • Rhymes: -æpt

Verb

adapt (third-person singular simple present adapts, present participle adapting, simple past and past participle adapted)

  1. (transitive) To make suitable; to make to correspond; to fit or suit
    Synonym: proportion
  2. (transitive) To fit by alteration; to modify or remodel for a different purpose; to adjust
  3. (transitive) To make by altering or fitting something else; to produce by change of form or character
  4. (intransitive) To make oneself comfortable to a new thing.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

adapt (comparative more adapt, superlative most adapt)

  1. Adapted; fit; suited; suitable.
    • c. 1709, Jonathan Swift, Merlin’s Prophecy
      This prediction, though somewhat obscure, is wonderfully adapt.

Translations

References

  • adapt in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • APDTA

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /əˈdap(t)/

Verb

adapt (third-person singular present adapts, present participle adaptin, past adaptit, past participle adaptit)

  1. to adapt

References

  • Eagle, Andy, ed. (2016) The Online Scots Dictionary, Scots Online.

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