babble vs talk what difference

what is difference between babble and talk

English

Etymology

From Middle English babelen, from Old English *bæblian, also wæflian (to talk foolishly), from Proto-Germanic *babalōną (to chatter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰa-bʰa-, perhaps a reduplication of Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂- (to say), or a variant of Proto-Indo-European *baba- (to talk vaguely, mumble), or a merger of the two, possibly ultimately onomatopoetic/mimicry of infantile sounds. Cognate with Old Frisian babbelje (to babble), Old Norse babbla (to babble) (Swedish babbla), Middle Low German babbelen (to babble), Dutch babbelen (to babble, chat), German pappeln and babbeln (to babble).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæb.l̩/
  • Rhymes: -æbəl

Verb

babble (third-person singular simple present babbles, present participle babbling, simple past and past participle babbled)

  1. (intransitive) To utter words indistinctly or unintelligibly; to utter inarticulate sounds
  2. (intransitive) To talk incoherently; to utter meaningless words.
  3. (intransitive) To talk too much; to chatter; to prattle.
  4. (intransitive) To make a continuous murmuring noise, like shallow water running over stones.
    • 1815, William Wordsworth, Extracts from Descriptive Sketches
      In every babbling brook he finds a friend.
  5. (transitive) To utter in an indistinct or incoherent way; to repeat words or sounds in a childish way without understanding.
    • 1712, John Arbuthnot, The History of John Bull
      These [words] he used to babble indifferently in all companies.
  6. (transitive) To reveal; to give away (a secret).

Translations

Noun

babble (usually uncountable, plural babbles)

  1. Idle talk; senseless prattle
    Synonyms: gabble, twaddle
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, a Mask, line 823:
      This is mere moral babble.
  2. Inarticulate speech; constant or confused murmur.
    • 1871, Charles Darwin, The Descent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex
      The babble of our young children.
  3. A sound like that of water gently flowing around obstructions.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Mariana
      The babble of the stream.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:chatter

Hyponyms

Translations

See also

  • babblement
  • babblery

References

  • babble in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

German

Verb

babble

  1. inflection of babbeln:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /tɔːk/
  • (US) IPA(key): /tɔk/
    • (w:cot–caught merger, w:northern cities vowel shift) IPA(key): /tɑk/, /täːk/
  • (General Australian, General New Zealand) IPA(key): /toːk/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːk
  • Homophones: torc, torq, torque (non-rhotic accents only), tock (in accents with the cot-caught merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English talken, talkien, from Old English tealcian (to talk, chat), from Proto-Germanic *talkōną (to talk, chatter), frequentative form of Proto-Germanic *talōną (to count, recount, tell), from Proto-Indo-European *dol-, *del- (to aim, calculate, adjust, count), equivalent to tell + -k. Cognate with Scots talk (to talk), Low German taalken (to talk). Related also to Danish tale (to talk, speak), Swedish tala (to talk, speak, say, chatter), Icelandic tala (to talk), Old English talian (to count, calculate, reckon, account, consider, think, esteem, value; argue; tell, relate; impute, assign). More at tale. Despite the surface similarity, unrelated to Proto-Indo-European *telkʷ- (to talk), which is the source of loquacious.

Alternative forms

  • taulke (obsolete)

Verb

talk (third-person singular simple present talks, present participle talking, simple past and past participle talked)

  1. (intransitive) To communicate, usually by means of speech.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Let’s go to my office and talk. ― I like to talk with you, Ms. Weaver.

  2. (transitive, informal) To discuss; to talk about.
  3. (transitive) To speak (a certain language).
  4. (transitive, informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) Used to emphasise the importance, size, complexity etc. of the thing mentioned.
  5. (intransitive, slang) To confess, especially implicating others.
  6. (intransitive) To criticize someone for something of which one is guilty oneself.
  7. (intransitive) To gossip; to create scandal.
  8. (informal, chiefly used in progressive tenses) To influence someone to express something, especially a particular stance or viewpoint or in a particular manner.
Conjugation

See also: talkest, talketh

Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:talk
Coordinate terms
  • listen
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English talk, talke (conversation; discourse), from the verb (see above).

Noun

talk (countable and uncountable, plural talks)

  1. A conversation or discussion; usually serious, but informal.
  2. A lecture.
  3. (uncountable) Gossip; rumour.
  4. (preceded by the; often qualified by a following of) A major topic of social discussion.
  5. (preceded by the) A customary conversation by parent(s) or guardian(s) with their (often teenaged) child about a reality of life; in particular:
    1. A customary conversation in which parent(s) explain sexual intercourse to their child.
      Have you had the talk with Jay yet?
    2. (US) A customary conversation in which the parent(s) of a black child explain the racism and violence they may face, especially when interacting with police, and strategies to manage it.
      • 2012, Crystal McCrary, Inspiration: Profiles of Black Women Changing Our World →ISBN:
        Later, I made sure to have the talk with my son about being a black boy, []
      • 2016, Jim Wallis, America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege, and the Bridge →ISBN:
        The Talk
        All the black parents I have ever spoken to have had “the talk” with their sons and daughters. “The talk” is a conversation about how to behave and not to behave with police.
      • 2016, Stuart Scott, Larry Platt, Every Day I Fight →ISBN, page 36:
        Now, I was a black man in the South, and my folks had had “the talk” with me. No, not the one about the birds and bees. This one is about the black man and the police.
  6. (uncountable, not preceded by an article) Empty boasting, promises or claims.
  7. (usually in the plural) Meeting to discuss a particular matter.
    The leaders of the G8 nations are currently in talks over nuclear weapons.
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:talk
  • (meeting): conference, debate, discussion, meeting
Derived terms
Translations

Related terms

Pages starting with “talk”.


Danish

Etymology

Via French talc or German Talk, from Persian طلق‎ (talq).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /talk/, [tˢalˀɡ̊]

Noun

talk c (singular definite talken, not used in plural form)

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Related terms

  • talkum

Dutch

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

Noun

talk m (uncountable)

  1. talc (soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch talch, from Old Dutch *talg, from Proto-Germanic *talgaz. More at English tallow.

Noun

talk c (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of talg (tallow)
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: talk

Anagrams

  • kalt

Polish

Noun

talk m inan

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension


Swedish

Noun

talk c

  1. talc (a soft, fine-grained mineral used in talcum powder)

Declension

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