baby vs sister what difference

what is difference between baby and sister

English

Etymology

From Middle English baby, babie (baby), a diminutive form of babe (babe, baby), equivalent to babe +‎ -y/-ie (endearing and diminutive suffix). Perhaps ultimately imitative of baby talk (compare babble).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, General American) enPR: bā’bē, IPA(key): /ˈbeɪbi/
  • Rhymes: -eɪbi

Noun

baby (plural babies)

  1. A very young human, particularly from birth to a couple of years old or until walking is fully mastered.
  2. Any very young animal, especially a vertebrate; many species have specific names for their babies, such as kittens for the babies of cats, puppies for the babies of dogs, and chicks for the babies of birds. See Category:Baby animals for more.
  3. Unborn young; a fetus.
  4. A person who is immature, infantile or feeble.
  5. A person who is new to or inexperienced in something.
  6. The lastborn of a family; the youngest sibling, irrespective of age.
    • 1895, S. R. Crockett, A Cry Across the Black Water
      “You are very dull this morning, Sheriff,” said the youngest daughter of the house, who, being the baby and pretty, had grown pettishly privileged in speech.
  7. A term of endearment used to refer to or address one’s girlfriend, boyfriend or spouse.
  8. (informal) A form of address to a man or a woman considered to be attractive.
  9. A pet project or responsibility.
    • 1996, Orlando Figes, A People’s Tragedy, Folio Society 2015, p. 902:
      Sovnarkom was Lenin’s baby, it was where he focused all his energies […].
  10. An affectionate term for anything.
  11. (archaic) A small image of an infant; a doll.

Synonyms

  • (young human being): babe, babby, babbie, infant, see also Thesaurus:baby
  • (young animal): see Thesaurus:youngling
  • (immature or infantile person): big baby
  • (term of endearment): love, see also Thesaurus:sweetheart

Translations

See also

  • gamete, zygote, morula, blastocyst, embryo, fetus

Adjective

baby (comparative babier or babyer or baby-er, superlative babiest or babyest or baby-est)

  1. (of vegetables, etc.) Picked when small and immature (as in baby corn, baby potatoes).
  2. Newest (overall, or in some group or state), most inexperienced.
    • 1894, Marion Harland, The Royal Road, Or, Taking Him at His Word, page 136:
      Mrs. Paull held out her hand to the babyest of the quartette, as they tiptoed up to the bed. “Lift her up, please, Marie!” she said, motioning to the place enclosed by her arm. When the rosy cheek touched hers upon the pillow, she asked …
    • 1910, Marion Harland, Marion Harland’s Autobiography: The Story of a Long Life, page 408:
      That evening, we grouped about the fire in the parlor, a wide circle that left room for the babyest of the party to disport themselves upon the rug, in the glow of the grate piled with cannel coal.
    • 2006, Marion Halligan, The Apricot Colonel, Allen & Unwin (→ISBN)
      Of when I was a baby editor. Very baby, it was actually a kind of work experience, I was still at university but I knew what I wanted. With a small independent publisher, good reputation, did some marvellous books, []
    • 2020, Hannah Abigail Clarke, The Scapegracers, Erewhon (→ISBN), page 391:
      [] party for Halloween proper? Just the four of us and some goofy, spooky kids’ movies, you know? Some cute pumpkin-shaped cupcakes? I could make my dog a little costume. He could be a baby witch. The babyest Scapegracer.” I blinked.
  3. (in the comparative or superlative) Like or pertaining to a baby, in size or youth; small, young.
    • 1888, Monthly Packet, page 170:
      Spider. Here let us begin at the beginning, at the babyest of books for Edith’s nursery.
    • 1894, Edith E. Cuthell, Two Little Children and Ching, page 107:
      She let it drop out of her sleeve, and it was two Chings — the dearest, littlest, babyest, tiny Chings — little balls of fur! And she ran away, and daddy’s father picked them up, and put them in his pockets, and brought them home, []
    • 1908, Marion Harland, Housekeeper’s Guide and Family Physician, page 98:
      Lemon-juice for ink spots: Not many weeks ago the babyest member of our household – perhaps moved by a hereditary tendency toward ink – slinging – divided the contents of an ink bottle impartially between the tiles of the bath-room floor …
    • 1908, Mary Findlater, Jane Helen Findlater, Crossriggs, page 25:
      “There’s a babier baby than Mike,” she said. “But you will see her to-morrow. Aren’t we rich? Come in and see Matilda – you won’t find her much changed. It’s so absurd to see her with all these children.”
    • 1936, United States. Congress. House. Committee on Military Affairs, To Promote the National Defense by Stengthening the Air Reserve, Hearings …, on H.R. 4348, 12241, Feb 27, April 22, 1936, page 31:
      Now, we all believe in national defense, but we also believe in peacetime activity, and my personal idea about aviation is that it is still in its absolute “babyest” type of infancy, that it is nothing even approaching what it will be even 10 years [from now].

Further reading

  • 1987, Raphael Sappan, The Rhetorical-logical Classification of Semantic Changes, volume 5, page 58:
    Baby. In its attributive uses, the word has the meaning ‘small, tiny’. In the following sentence it is a metonym, still preserving its relation to the original meaning: “There is a babier baby than M.” (in the entry baby of the first volume of  []

Verb

baby (third-person singular simple present babies, present participle babying, simple past and past participle babied)

  1. (transitive) To coddle; to pamper somebody like an infant.
    • 1922, Sinclair Lewis, Babbitt, Chapter, [2]
      [] though he tried to be gruff and mature, he yielded to her and was glad to be babied.
    • 1944, Emily Carr, The House of All Sorts, “Friction,” [3]
      Then the man effected measles and stayed off the job for six weeks, babying himself at home, though he lived just round the corner from my half-built house.
  2. (transitive) To tend (something) with care; to be overly attentive to (something), fuss over.
    • 1967, “Mr. Mac and His Team,” Time, 31 March, 1967, [4]
      In the past 27 years, “Mr. Mac,” as he is known to his 46,000 teammates, has built and babied his McDonnell Co. from nothing into a $1 billion-a-year corporation.
    • 1912, Linda Craig, interviewed by Theresa Forte, “Tree and Twig farm — a treasure chest of heirloom tomatoes,” Welland Tribune, 25 May, 2012, [5]
      I have grown them for years and although some years are better than others, I have always had loads of tomatoes by not babying them, going easy on the water, and fertilizing with compost in the planting hole.

Translations

Derived terms

Pages starting with “baby”.

Related terms

  • babe

See also

  • child
  • infant
  • toddler

References

Anagrams

  • Abby

Danish

Etymology

Borrowed from English baby.

Noun

baby c (singular definite babyen, plural indefinite babyer)

  1. A baby, an infant.
  2. (slang) An attractive young female.

Inflection

Synonyms

  • spædbarn

Derived terms


Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English baby.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbeːbi/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧by

Noun

baby m (plural baby’s or babies, diminutive baby’tje n)

  1. baby (infant)
    Synonym: zuigeling

Derived terms

  • babyboom
  • babyface
  • babyfoon
  • babykleding
  • babykleren
  • babyluier
  • babypoeder
  • babyshampoo

Finnish

Alternative forms

  • beibi

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbei̯bi/, [ˈbe̞i̯bi]
  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑby/, [ˈbɑby] (rare)

Noun

baby

  1. baby (term of endearment)
  2. baby (very young human)

Declension

This spelling should preferably be used in nominative only as it does not fit into any standard inflection scheme.

Synonyms

  • (very young human) vauva
  • (term of endearment) kulta

French

Etymology

From English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.bi/

Noun

baby m (plural babys)

  1. table soccer, table football
  2. baby, darling, sweetheart

Further reading

  • “baby” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Interlingua

Noun

baby

  1. baby

Synonyms

  • bebe

Italian

Etymology

From English baby.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɛ.bi/, (careful style) /ˈbe.bi/

Noun

baby m (invariable)

  1. child, baby, neonate
  2. a small shot of whisky
  3. tripod for a film camera

Adjective

baby (invariable)

  1. for use by young children
  2. very young

References


Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbabɨ/

Noun

baby

  1. inflection of baba:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • babee, babi, babie

Etymology

From babe +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːbiː/, /ˈbabiː/

Noun

baby

  1. (rare) A child or baby.

Descendants

  • English: baby, babby
  • Scots: babbie

References

  • “bābe, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English baby

Noun

baby m (definite singular babyen, indefinite plural babyer, definite plural babyene)

  1. a baby

Synonyms

  • spedbarn

Derived terms

  • babymat
  • babyolje

References

  • “baby” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English baby

Noun

baby m (definite singular babyen, indefinite plural babyar, definite plural babyane)

  1. a baby

Synonyms

  • spedbarn

Derived terms

  • babymat
  • babyolje

References

  • “baby” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.bɨ/

Noun

baby f

  1. inflection of baba:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Slovak

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbabi]

Noun

baby

  1. inflection of baba:
    1. genitive singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Spanish

Noun

baby m (plural babys)

  1. baby


English

Etymology

From Middle English sister, suster, from Old English swustor, sweoster, sweostor (sister, nun); from Proto-Germanic *swestēr (sister), from Proto-Indo-European *swésōr (sister).

Cognate with Scots sister, syster (sister), West Frisian sus, suster (sister), Dutch zuster (sister), German Schwester (sister), Norwegian Bokmål søster (sister), Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish syster (sister), Icelandic systir (sister), Gothic ???????????????????????????? (swistar, sister), Latin soror (sister), Russian сестра́ (sestrá, sister), Lithuanian sesuo (sister), Albanian vajzë (girl, maiden), Sanskrit स्वसृ (svásṛ, sister), Persian خواهر(xâhar, sister).

In standard English, the form with i is due to contamination with Old Norse systir (sister).

The plural sistren is from Middle English sistren, a variant plural of sister, suster (sister); compare brethren.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈsɪs.tə/
  • (General American) enPR: sĭs’tər, IPA(key): /ˈsɪs.tɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪstə(r)
  • Hyphenation: sis‧ter

Noun

sister (plural sisters or (archaic in most senses) sistren)

  1. A daughter of the same parents as another person; a female sibling.
    Synonym: (slang) sis
    Antonym: brother
    Hypernym: sibling
  2. A female member of a religious order; especially one devoted to more active service; (informal) a nun.
    Synonyms: nun, sistren
    Coordinate terms: brother, friar, frater
  3. Any butterfly in the genus Adelpha, so named for the resemblance of the dark-colored wings to the black habit traditionally worn by nuns.
  4. (Britain) A senior or supervisory nurse, often in a hospital.
    Synonym: charge nurse
  5. Any woman or girl with whom a bond is felt through common membership of a race, profession, religion or organization, such as feminism.
  6. (slang, sometimes capitalized) A black woman.
    • 2009, Rajen Persaud, Why Black Men Love White Women, Simon and Schuster (→ISBN), page 171:
      The short “naps” of the average Sister do not sway in the wind as that of a blonde.
  7. (informal) A form of address to a woman.
    Synonyms: darling, dear, love, (US) lady, miss, (northern UK) pet
  8. A woman, in certain labour or socialist circles; also as a form of address.
  9. (attributively) An entity that has a special or affectionate, non-hierarchical relationship with another.
    Synonyms: affiliate, affiliated
  10. (computing theory) A node in a data structure that shares its parent with another node.
  11. (usually attributively) Something in the same class.

Usage notes

  • In Roman Catholicism, a distinction is often drawn (especially by members of female religious orders) between nuns and sisters, the former being cloistered and devoted primarily to prayer, the latter being more active, doing work such as operating hospitals, caring for the poor, or teaching.
  • The plural sistren is no longer commonly used for biological sisters in contemporary English (although it was in the past) but may be found in some religious, feminist, or poetic usage.

Derived terms

Related terms

  • sororal
  • sistren

Coordinate terms

  • brother
  • brethren

Descendants

  • Gulf Arabic: سِسْتَر(sistər, female nurse)
  • Japanese: シスター (shisutā)
  • Korean: 시스터 (siseuteo)

Translations

Verb

sister (third-person singular simple present sisters, present participle sistering, simple past and past participle sistered)

  1. (transitive, construction) To strengthen (a supporting beam) by fastening a second beam alongside it.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To be sister to; to resemble closely.
    • c. 1607, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, Act V, Scene 1
      Deep clerks she dumbs; and with her needle composes
      Nature’s own shape, of bud, bird, branch, or berry,
      That even her art sisters the natural roses;
      Her inkle, silk, twin with the rubied cherry

Translations

Further reading

  • Sister (disambiguation) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • sister in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Istres, Reists, reists, resist, resits, restis, risest

Middle English

Noun

sister

  1. Alternative form of suster

Scots

Etymology

From Middle English sister, syster, forms of suster influenced by Old Norse systir, from Old English sweostor, swustor, sweoster, from Proto-Germanic *swestēr, from Proto-Indo-European *swésōr.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsɪstər]

Noun

sister (plural sisteris)

  1. sister

Derived terms

  • guid-sister

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