backlash vs rebound what difference

what is difference between backlash and rebound

English

Etymology

From back +‎ lash.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbækˌlæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Noun

backlash (countable and uncountable, plural backlashes)

  1. A sudden backward motion.
  2. (figuratively) A negative reaction, objection or outcry, especially of a violent or abrupt nature.
  3. (mechanics) The distance through which one part of connected machinery, as a wheel, piston, or screw, can be moved without moving the connected parts, resulting from looseness in fitting or from wear.
  4. The jarring or reflex motion caused in badly fitting machinery by irregularities in velocity or a reverse of motion.

Derived terms

  • techlash

Translations

Verb

backlash (third-person singular simple present backlashes, present participle backlashing, simple past and past participle backlashed)

  1. To cause or set off a backlash.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

Anagrams

  • Kalbachs, black ash, hacklabs


English

Etymology 1

From Old French rebondir.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹiˈbaʊnd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹibaʊnd/

Noun

rebound (plural rebounds)

  1. The recoil of an object bouncing off another.
  2. A return to health or well-being; a recovery.
  3. An effort to recover from a setback.
  4. (colloquial) A romantic partner with whom one begins a relationship (or the relationship one begins) for the sake of getting over a previous, recently-ended romantic relationship.
  5. (sports) The strike of the ball after it has bounced off a defending player, the crossbar or goalpost.
  6. (basketball) An instance of catching the ball after it has hit the rim or backboard without a basket being scored, generally credited to a particular player.
Translations

Derived terms

  • rebound effect
  • rebound phenomenon
  • rebound relationship
  • rebound tenderness
  • rebound therapy
  • rebound volleyball

Verb

rebound (third-person singular simple present rebounds, present participle rebounding, simple past and past participle rebounded)

  1. To bound or spring back from a force.
    • Bodies which are absolutely hard, or so soft as to be void of elasticity, will not rebound from one another.
  2. To give back an echo.
    • a. 1714, Alexander Pope, Autumn
      each cave and echoing rock rebounds
  3. (figuratively) To jump up or get back up again.
  4. (transitive) To send back; to reverberate.
    • Silenus sung; the vales his voice rebound, / And carry to the skies the sacred sound.
Translations

See also

  • bound (verb)

Etymology 2

see rebind

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹibɑʊnd/

Verb

rebound

  1. simple past tense and past participle of rebind

Anagrams

  • bounder, unbored, unrobed

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