bacteria vs bacterium what difference

what is difference between bacteria and bacterium

English

Pronunciation

  • (US) IPA(key): /bækˈtɪɹ.i.ə/
  • (UK) IPA(key): /bækˈtɪəɹ.ɪ.ə/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɹiə
  • Rhymes: -ɪəɹiə

Etymology 1

From New Latin bacteria, plural of bacterium, from Ancient Greek βακτήριον (baktḗrion), neuter diminutive of βακτηρία (baktēría, rod, stick) (cognate with English peg).

Noun

bacteria

  1. plural of bacterium

bacteria (plural bacterias)

  1. (US) A type, species, or strain of bacterium.
  2. (US, proscribed) Alternative form of bacterium.
  3. (derogatory, slang) A derisive term for a lowlife or a slob (could be treated as plural or singular).
Usage notes
  • This is the plural form of the word. While it is often used as if it were singular (as a collective noun), this is considered nonstandard by some in the US and more elsewhere. See the usage examples under bacterium.
Derived terms
  • Bacteria
  • Eubacteria
  • Archaebacteria / Archebacteria
  • eubacteria
  • archaebacteria / archebacteria
Translations

see also under bacterium

See also
  • culture (collective noun)

Etymology 2

From New Latin bacteria, from Ancient Greek βακτηρία (baktēría, rod, stick).

Noun

bacteria (plural bacteriae)

  1. (dated, medicine) An oval bacterium, as distinguished from a spherical coccus or rod-shaped bacillus.

Anagrams

  • Arabetic, race-bait

Galician

Noun

bacteria f (plural bacterias)

  1. bacterium

Latin

Noun

bactēria

  1. nominative plural of bactērium
  2. accusative plural of bactērium
  3. vocative plural of bactērium

Spanish

Etymology

From New Latin bacteria, plural of bactērium, from Ancient Greek βακτήριον (baktḗrion).

Noun

bacteria f (plural bacterias)

  1. bacterium

Derived terms

  • antibacteria
  • bacterial
  • bacteriano

Further reading

  • “bacteria” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

From New Latin bactērium, from Ancient Greek βακτήριον (baktḗrion, small staff), from βακτηρία (baktēría).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bækˈtɪəɹ.ɪəm/

Noun

bacterium (plural bacteria)

  1. (microbiology) A single celled organism with cell walls but no nucleus or organelles.

Usage notes

  • In most formal writing, bacterium is the singular form of the noun, and bacteria the plural form. This is in accord with the word’s Latin etymology. However, in ordinary speech, some speakers use bacteria as a singular, with plural either bacteria or bacterias. This is usually considered nonstandard.

Hypernyms

  • prokaryote

Hyponyms

  • See also Thesaurus:bacterium

Derived terms

  • eubacterium
  • archaebacterium / archebacterium
  • urobacterium
  • bacterial

Translations

Further reading

  • bacterium on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

See also

  • bacillus

Latin

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βακτήριον (baktḗrion, small staff), from βακτηρία (baktēría).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /bakˈteː.ri.um/, [bäkˈt̪eːɾiʊ̃ˑ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /bakˈte.ri.um/, [bɑkˈt̪ɛːrium]

Noun

bactērium n (genitive bactēriī or bactērī); second declension

  1. (microbiology) bacterium

Declension

Second-declension noun (neuter).

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

References

  • bacterium in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

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