badmouth vs malign what difference

what is difference between badmouth and malign

English

Alternative forms

  • bad-mouth

Etymology

From a Mande term, perhaps Vai [Term?] or Mandinka [Term?], which entered English via Gullah [Term?]. Compare Japanese 悪口(わるぐち) (waruguchi, to badmouth), which is a compound of (わる) (waru, bad, wicked) and (くち) (kuchi, mouth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæd.maʊθ/

Verb

badmouth (third-person singular simple present badmouths, present participle badmouthing, simple past and past participle badmouthed)

  1. (informal) To criticize or malign, especially unfairly or spitefully.
    • 1987 August 30, Benedict Nightingale, Theater: England’s Endless Love Affair with Farce, New York Times (retrieved 22 July 2013):
      . . . those cross-Atlantic aficionados who persistently idolize the British theater and bad-mouth Broadway.

Translations

References



English

Etymology

From Middle English maligne, from Old French maligne, from Latin malignus, from malus (bad) + genus (sort, kind). Compare benign.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: mə-līn’, IPA(key): /məˈlaɪn/

Adjective

malign (comparative more malign, superlative most malign)

  1. Evil or malignant in disposition, nature, intent or influence.
  2. Malevolent.
    • 1891, Ambrose Bierce, An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge
      He was sure they [the stars] were arranged in some order which had a secret and malign significance.
  3. (oncology) Malignant.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Seditions and Troubles
      malign ulcers

Antonyms

  • benign

Related terms

  • malignant

Translations

Verb

malign (third-person singular simple present maligns, present participle maligning, simple past and past participle maligned)

  1. (transitive) To make defamatory statements about; to slander or traduce.
    • To be envied and shot at; to be maligned standing, and to be despised falling.
  2. (transitive, archaic) To treat with malice; to show hatred toward; to abuse; to wrong.
    • The people practice what mischiefs and villainies they will against private men, whom they malign by stealing their goods, or murdering them.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:defame

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gilman, laming, lingam

Middle English

Adjective

malign

  1. Alternative form of maligne

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin malignus

Adjective

malign (masculine and feminine malign, neuter malignt, definite singular and plural maligne)

  1. (medicine) malignant

References

  • “malign” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “malign” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin malignus

Adjective

malign (masculine and feminine malign, neuter malignt, definite singular and plural maligne)

  1. (medicine) malignant

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