bagatelle vs fluff what difference

what is difference between bagatelle and fluff

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French bagatelle, from Italian bagattella.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌbæɡəˈtɛl/

Noun

bagatelle (plural bagatelles)

  1. A trifle; an insubstantial thing.
    • 1782, Charles Macklin, Love a-la-Mode 21:,
      Sir C. Oh! dear madam, don’t ask me, it’s a very foolish song—a mere bagatelle.
      Char. Oh! Sir Callaghan, I will admit of no excuse.
    • 1850, Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine (volume 68, page 226)
      [] the jails were larger and fuller, the number of murders was incomparably greater, the thefts and swindlings in the old country were a bagatelle to the large depredations there []
    • 1879 September 6, “Railway Projects”, Railway World, 5 (36): 853
      The repayment of the cost of the western part of the road, whatever it might be, would be a mere bagatelle, for the older provinces would have been enriched by the stimulus given to business by the opening up of the plains, []
    Synonyms: bag of shells; see also Thesaurus:trifle
  2. A short piece of literature or of instrumental music, typically light or playful in character.
    • 2007, Norman Lebrecht, The Life And Death of Classical Music, page 7
      One afternoon in 1920. a young pianist sat down in a shuttered room in the capital of defeated Germany and played a Bagatelle by Beethoven.
  3. A game similar to billiards played on an oblong table with pockets or arches at one end only.
    • 1895, Hugh Legge, “The Repton Club”, in John Matthew Knapp (ed.), The Universities and the Social Problem, page 139
      For some time they did nothing save box, but at last they went down to the bagatelle room, and played bagatelle for a bit. They marked this advance in civilization by prodding holes in the ceiling with the bagatelle cues, which gave the ceiling the appearance of a cloth target after a Gatling gun had been shooting at it.
  4. Any of several smaller, wooden table top games developed from the original bagatelle in which the pockets are made of pins; also called pin bagatelle, hit-a-pin bagatelle, jaw ball.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • carom
  • pachinko
  • pinball

Verb

bagatelle (third-person singular simple present bagatelles, present participle bagatelling, simple past and past participle bagatelled)

  1. (intransitive, rare) To meander or move around, in a manner similar to the ball in the game of bagatelle.
  2. (transitive, rare) To bagatellize; to regard as a bagatelle.

Further reading

  • bagatelle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • bagatelle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • bagatelle at OneLook Dictionary Search

French

Etymology

From Italian bagattella.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.ɡa.tɛl/

Noun

bagatelle f (plural bagatelles)

  1. bagatelle, trinket, bauble
  2. (food) trifle

Descendants

  • Danish: bagatel
  • Dutch: bagatel
  • English: bagatelle
  • German: Bagatelle

Further reading

  • “bagatelle” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Noun

bagatelle f

  1. plural of bagatella

Anagrams

  • gabellate


English

Etymology

From earlier floow (woolly substance, down, nap, lint), also spelt flough, flue, and flew, from West Flemish vluwe,
of uncertain ultimate origin:

  • Compare Old English flōh (that which is flown off, fragment, piece) – see flaw
  • Possibly representing a blend of flue +‎ puff; compare Middle Dutch vloe, or perhaps onomatopoeic; compare dialectal English floose, flooze, fleeze (particles of wool or cotton; fluff; loose threads or fibres), Danish fnug (down, fluff), Swedish fnugg (speck, flake).
  • Alternatively, West Flemish vluwe may derive from French velu (hairy, furry), ultimately from Latin villus (shaggy hair, tuft of hair).

For words of similar sound and meaning in other languages, compare Japanese フワフワ (fuwafuwa, lightly, softly), Hungarian puha (“soft, fluffy”), Polish puchaty (“soft, fluffy”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /flʌf/
  • Rhymes: -ʌf

Noun

fluff (plural fluffs)

  1. Anything light, soft or fuzzy, especially fur, hair, feathers.
  2. Anything inconsequential or superficial.
  3. (informal) A lapse or mistake, especially a mistake in an actor’s lines.
    Synonym: flub
  4. (New England) Marshmallow creme.
    That New England-style salami and fluff sandwich sure hit the spot!
  5. (LGBT) A passive partner in a lesbian relationship.
  6. (Australia, euphemistic) A fart.

(Can we add an example for this sense?)

Synonyms

  • (anything light, soft or fuzzy): fuzz, oose (Scotland), puff
  • (anything inconsequential or superficial): BS, cruft, hype, all talk
  • (a lapse): blooper, blunder, boo-boo, defect, error, fault, faux pas, gaffe, lapse, mistake, slip, stumble, thinko
  • (passive in a lesbian relationship): ruffle
  • See also Thesaurus:error

Derived terms

  • bit of fluff
  • bumfluff
  • fluffball
  • fluffhead
  • fluffiness
  • fluffless
  • flufflike
  • fluffy
  • marshmallow fluff

Translations

See also

  • dust
  • lint
  • plumage

Verb

fluff (third-person singular simple present fluffs, present participle fluffing, simple past and past participle fluffed)

  1. (transitive) To make something fluffy.
    The cat fluffed its tail.
  2. (intransitive) To become fluffy, puff up.
  3. (intransitive) To move lightly like fluff.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holmes to this entry?)
  4. (informal, transitive, intransitive, of an actor or announcer) To make a mistake in one’s lines.
    Synonym: flub
  5. (informal, transitive) To do incorrectly, for example mishit, miskick, miscue etc.
    Synonym: flub
  6. (intransitive, Australia, euphemistic) To fart.
  7. (transitive, slang) To arouse (a male pornographic actor) before filming.
    • 2008, Blue Blake, Out of the Blue: Confessions of an Unlikely Porn Star (page 187)
      To get Lance Bronson hard, Chi Chi, in desperation, called Sharon Kane to come and fluff him on the set. People were always asking me how they could get a job as a fluffer.

Derived terms

  • fluff-dry
  • fluffer
  • fluff girl
  • fluff up
  • mattress fluffer

Translations

Further reading

  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “fluff”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Swedish

Noun

fluff c

  1. fluffy (and absorbent) stuff in a baby’s diaper

Declension

Synonyms

  • fluffmassa

Related terms

  • fluffa
  • fluffig

References

  • fluff in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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