baggage vs luggage what difference

what is difference between baggage and luggage

English

Etymology

From Middle English bagage, from Old French bagage, from bague (bundle), from Germanic (compare bag).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băg’ĭj, IPA(key): /ˈbæɡɪdʒ/
    • Hyphenation: bag‧gage
    • Rhymes: -æɡɪdʒ

Noun

baggage (usually uncountable, plural baggages)

  1. (uncountable) Portable cases, large bags, and similar equipment for manually carrying, pushing, or pulling personal items while traveling
Uncountable synonyms: luggage; gear; stuff
Countable synonyms: bags; suitcases
  1. (uncountable, informal) Factors, especially psychological ones, which interfere with a person’s ability to function effectively.
    This person has got a lot of emotional baggage.
  2. (obsolete, countable, derogatory) A woman.
    • 1936: Like the Phoenix by Anthony Bertram
      However, terrible as it may seem to the tall maiden sisters of J.P.’s in Queen Anne houses with walled vegetable gardens, this courtesan, strumpet, harlot, whore, punk, fille de joie, street-walker, this trollop, this trull, this baggage, this hussy, this drab, skit, rig, quean, mopsy, demirep, demimondaine, this wanton, this fornicatress, this doxy, this concubine, this frail sister, this poor Queenie–did actually solicit me, did actually say ‘coming home to-night, dearie’ and my soul was not blasted enough to call a policeman.
    • 1964: My Fair Lady (film)
      Shall we ask this baggage to sit down or shall we just throw her out of the window?
  3. (military, countable (obsolete) and uncountable) An army’s portable equipment; its baggage train.
    • 2007, Norman Davies, No Simple Victory: World War II in Europe, 1939–1945, New York: Penguin, p 305:
      In Poland, for example, the unknown Bolesław Bierut, who appeared in 1944 in the baggage of the Red Army, and who played a prominent role as a ‘non-party figure’ in the Lublin Committee, turned out to be a Soviet employee formerly working for the Comintern.

Derived terms

Translations



English

Etymology

1590s, lug (to drag) +‎ -age, literally “that which is lugged, dragged around”. Duplicate -g- is to clarify pronunciation of the vowel ‘u’ (which is pronounced unchanged from lug). Compare baggage.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) enPR: lŭg’ĭj, IPA(key): /ˈlʌɡɪd͡ʒ/
  • Hyphenation: lug‧gage

Noun

luggage (usually uncountable, plural luggages)

  1. (uncountable) The bags and other containers that hold a traveller’s belongings.
    • August 4, 1726, Jonathan Swift, letter to Alexander Pope
      I am gathering up my luggage, and preparing for my journey.
  2. (uncountable) The contents of such containers.
  3. (countable, nonstandard or obsolete) A specific bag or container holding a traveller’s belongings.

Synonyms

  • baggage

Derived terms

  • hold luggage
  • cabin luggage
  • carry-on luggage
  • checked luggage
  • hand luggage

Translations

References


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