bail vs bond what difference

what is difference between bail and bond

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɪ̯l/, [ˈbeɪ̯(ə)ɫ], [beə̯ɫ]
  • Rhymes: -eɪl
  • Homophone: bale

Etymology 1

From Middle English baille, from the Old French verb bailler (to deliver or hand over) and noun bail (lease), from Latin bāiulāre, present active infinitive of bāiulō (carry or bear), from baiulus (porter; steward) (English: bailiff).

Noun

bail (plural bails)

  1. Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person’s appearance for trial.
  2. (law, Britain) Release from imprisonment on payment of such money.
  3. (law, Britain) The person providing such payment.
  4. A bucket or scoop used for removing water from a boat etc.
    • 1770, James Cook, Voyages Round the World
      The bail of a canoe [] made of a human skull.
  5. A person who bails water out of a boat.
  6. (obsolete) Custody; keeping.
Derived terms
  • jump bail
  • out on bail
Related terms
  • bailiff
Translations

Verb

bail (third-person singular simple present bails, present participle bailing, simple past and past participle bailed)

  1. To secure the release of an arrested person by providing bail.
  2. (law) To release a person under such guarantee.
  3. (law) To hand over personal property to be held temporarily by another as a bailment.
    to bail cloth to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier
  4. (nautical, transitive, intransitive) To remove (water) from a boat by scooping it out.
    to bail water out of a boat
    • November 4, 1857, Henry William Harper, letter to St. John
      we had hard work to reach our haven, having to bail out the water with my straw hat.
  5. (nautical, transitive) To remove water from (a boat) by scooping it out.
    to bail a boat
    • 1840, Richard Henry Dana Jr., s:Two Years Before the Mast Chapter XVIII
      By the help of a small bucket and our hats we bailed her out.
  6. To set free; to deliver; to release.
Derived terms
  • bailment
  • bailor
  • bailee
  • bail out
Related terms
  • bailiff
Translations

Etymology 2

From a shortening of bail out, which from above.

Verb

bail (third-person singular simple present bails, present participle bailing, simple past and past participle bailed)

  1. (slang) To exit quickly.
    • 2010 September, Jeannette Cooperman, “Bringing It Home”, St. Louis magazine, ISSN 1090-5723, volume 16, issue 9, page 62:
      The Teacher Home Visit Program takes a huge commitment—time, energy, patience, diplomacy. Quite a few schools [] have tried it and bailed.
  2. (informal, intransitive, followed by “on”) To fail to meet a commitment (to a person).

Etymology 3

From Middle English beyl, from Middle English beygla (a bend, ring or hoop).

Noun

bail (plural bails)

  1. A hoop, ring or handle (especially of a kettle or bucket).
    • 2010, John M. Findley, Just Lucky, page 78,
      I reached across beneath the cow to attach a metal bail to each end of the strap so that the bail hung about 5 inches below the cow’s belly. [] While stroking and talking to the cow, I reached under and suspended the machine on the bail beneath the cow, with its four suction cups dangling to one side.
  2. A stall for a cow (or other animal) (usually tethered with a semi-circular hoop).
    • 1953, British Institute of Management, Centre for Farm Management, Farm Management Association, Farm Managememt, 1960, John Wiley, page 160,
      More recently, the fixed bail, sometimes called the ‘milking parlour’, with either covered or open yards, has had a certain vogue and some very enthusiastic claims have been made for this method of housing.
    • 2011, Edith H. Whetham, Joan Thirsk, The Agrarian History of England and Wales, Volume 8: Volumes 1914-1939, page 191,
      Ten men thus sufficed for the milking of three hundred cows in five bails, instead of the thirty men who would normally have been employed by conventional methods.
  3. A hinged bar as a restraint for animals, or on a typewriter.
  4. (chiefly Australia and New Zealand) A frame to restrain a cow during milking or feeding.
    • 2011, Bob Ellis, Hush Now, Don’t Cry, page 153,
      But until he had poured enough milk into the vat above the separator, I drove unmilked cows into the bail where he had previously milked and released one. He moved from one bail to the other to milk the next one I had readied. I drove each cow into the empty bail, chained her in, roped the outer hind leg then washed and massaged the udder and teats.
  5. A hoop, ring, or other object used to connect a pendant to a necklace.
  6. (cricket) One of the two wooden crosspieces that rest on top of the stumps to form a wicket.
  7. (furniture) Normally curved handle suspended between sockets as a drawer pull. This may also be on a kettle or pail.
Translations

Verb

bail (third-person singular simple present bails, present participle bailing, simple past and past participle bailed)

  1. To secure the head of a cow during milking.

Etymology 4

From French baillier.

Verb

bail (third-person singular simple present bails, present participle bailing, simple past and past participle bailed)

  1. (rare) To confine.
  2. (Australia, New Zealand) To secure (a cow) by placing its head in a bail for milking.
  3. (Australia, New Zealand) To keep (a traveller) detained in order to rob them; to corner (a wild animal); loosely, to detain, hold up. (Usually with up.)
    • 2006, Clive James, North Face of Soho, Picador 2007, p. 128:
      The transition over the rooftop would have been quicker if Sellers had not been bailed up by a particularly hostile spiritual presence speaking Swedish.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Albi, Bali, Liab.

Bouyei

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *pajᴬ (to go). Cognate with Thai ไป (bpai), Northern Thai ᨻᩱ (pai), Khün ᨻᩱ (pai), Lao ໄປ (pai), ᦺᦔ (ṗay) and ᦺᦗ (pay), Tai Dam ꪼꪜ, Shan ပႆ (pǎy), Aiton ပႝ (pay), Zhuang bae.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɐi˨˦/

Verb

bail

  1. to go
  2. to walk
  3. to go away; to leave
  4. to spend; to use up

Preposition

bail

  1. to; toward

Cimbrian

Etymology

See baille (while)

Conjunction

bail

  1. (Sette Comuni) while

Related terms

  • baille

References

  • “bail” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baj/
  • Homophones: baille, baillent, bailles, bye

Etymology 1

From bailler.

Noun

bail m (plural baux)

  1. lease (contract)
  2. (colloquial) yonks, ages

Derived terms

  • contrat de bail

Etymology 2

From Haitian Creole bagay, from French bagage.

Noun

bail m (plural bails)

  1. (slang) thing, stuff, affair

Further reading

  • “bail” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Irish

Alternative forms

  • abail

Etymology

From Old Irish bal (state (of affairs), condition, situation; prosperity, good luck, good effect); see buil (effect, result, condition, completion).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bˠalʲ/

Noun

bail f (genitive singular baile)

  1. prosperity
    Synonym: rath
    Proverb:
  2. proper condition, order
  3. state
  4. treatment
  5. validity

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

Further reading

  • “bail” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “bal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “bail” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “bail” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Latvian

Etymology

Originally a reduced form of *bailu, an u-stem parallel form to the archaic singular form baile of bailes “fear” (cf. Lithuanian bailùs “afraid”).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bâjl]

Adverb

bail (+ dat. + (no +) gen.)

  1. afraid, scared (in the mental state typical of fear)

References


Palauan

Etymology

From Pre-Palauan *bayul, from Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *balun, form Proto-Austronesian *baluN.

Noun

bail

  1. cloth

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology 1

From the root of buil (consequence, completion, result)

Noun

bail f

  1. thrift, frugality
Derived terms
  • baileach
  • mì-bhail

Etymology 2

From Latin ballista

Noun

bail f

  1. sling, ballista

References



English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɑnd/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɒnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English bond, a variant of band, from Old English beand, bænd, bend (bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandaz, *bandiz (band, fetter). Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Swedish band. Doublet of Bund. Related to bind.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. (law) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.
  2. (finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.
  3. A partial payment made to show a provider that the customer is sincere about buying a product or a service. If the product or service is not purchased the customer then forfeits the bond.
  4. (often in the plural) A physical connection which binds, a band.
  5. An emotional link, connection or union; that which holds two or more people together, as in a friendship; a tie.
    • 1792, Edmund Burke, a letter to Sir Hercules Langrishe on the subject of the Roman Catholics of Ireland
      a people with whom I have no tie but the common bond of mankind.
  6. Moral or political duty or obligation.
  7. (chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.
  8. A binding agreement, a covenant.
  9. A bail bond.
  10. Any constraining or cementing force or material.
  11. (construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.
  12. In Scotland, a mortgage.
  13. (railways) A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bond (third-person singular simple present bonds, present participle bonding, simple past and past participle bonded)

  1. (transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.
  2. (transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).
  3. (transitive, chemistry) To form a chemical compound with.
  4. (transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.
  5. To form a friendship or emotional connection.
  6. (transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse; to secure (goods) until the associated duties are paid.
  7. (transitive, construction) To lay bricks in a specific pattern.
  8. (transitive, electricity) To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).
  9. To bail out by means of a bail bond.
    • 1877, Report No. 704 of proceedings In the Senate of the United States, 44th Congress, 2nd Session, page 642:
      In the August election of 1874 I bonded out of jail eighteen colored men that had been in there, and there has not one of them been tried yet, and they never will be.
    • 1995, Herman Beavers, Wrestling angels into song: the fictions of Ernest J. Gaines, page 28:
      In jail for killing a man, Procter Lewis is placed in a cell where he is faced with a choice: he can be bonded out of jail by Roger Medlow, the owner of the plantation where he lives, or he can serve his time in the penitentiary.
    • 2001, Elaine J. Lawless, Women escaping violence: empowerment through narrative, page xxi:
      And no, you cannot drive her down to the bank to see if her new AFDC card is activated and drop her kids off at school for her because she didn’t think to get her car before he bonded out of jail.

Synonyms

  • (to cause to adhere): cling, stick; see also Thesaurus:adhere
Derived terms
  • bondability
  • bondable
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bonde (peasant, servant, bondman), from Old English bōnda, būnda (householder, freeman, plebeian, husband), perhaps from Old Norse bóndi (husbandman, householder, literally dweller), or a contraction of Old English būend (dweller, inhabitant), both from Proto-Germanic *būwandz (dweller), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰew- (to swell, grow). See also bower, boor.

Noun

bond (plural bonds)

  1. A peasant; churl.
  2. A vassal; serf; one held in bondage to a superior.

Adjective

bond (comparative more bond, superlative most bond)

  1. Subject to the tenure called bondage.
  2. In a state of servitude or slavedom; not free.
  3. Servile; slavish; pertaining to or befitting a slave.
Derived terms
  • Bond
  • bondage
  • bondfolk
  • bondland
  • bondly
  • bondmaid
  • bondman, bondsman
  • bondservant
  • bond-service
  • bond-slave
  • bond-tenant
  • bondwoman, bondswoman

Related terms

  • boor
  • bower

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔnt/
  • Hyphenation: bond
  • Rhymes: -ɔnt
  • Homophone: bont

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bund. The word could also be neuter until the 19th century, when it became increasingly common under the influence of German Bund.

Noun

bond m (plural bonden, diminutive bondje n)

  1. society, fellowship
    Synonym: verbond
  2. union, association, guild
    vakbond – trade union
  3. coalition, alliance, league
    Volkenbond – League of Nations
  4. covenant, agreement
  5. (dated) bundle (set of objects packed or tied together)
Derived terms
  • bondsrepubliek
  • bondsstaat
  • Volkenbond
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: bond
  • Papiamentu: bònt

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

bond

  1. singular past indicative of binden

French

Etymology

From bondir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔ̃/
  • Homophones: bon, bons, bonds
  • Rhymes: -ɔ̃

Noun

bond m (plural bonds)

  1. jump, bound, leap
  2. bounce

Derived terms

  • faire faux bond
  • saisir la balle au bond

Further reading

  • “bond” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle English

Noun

bond

  1. Alternative form of band

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