bait vs hook what difference

what is difference between bait and hook

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt
  • Homophone: bate

Etymology 1

From Middle English bayte, bait, beite, from Old Norse beita (food, bait), from Proto-Germanic *baitō (that which is bitten, bait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with German Beize (mordant, corrosive fluid; marinade; hunting), Old English bāt (that which can be bitten, food, bait). Related to bite.

Noun

bait (countable and uncountable, plural baits)

  1. Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
  2. Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
  3. Anything which allures; something used to lure or entice someone or something into doing something
  4. A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, chapter 20 page 70
      The tediousness of a two hours’ bait at Petty-France, in which there was nothing to be done but to eat without being hungry, and loiter about without any thing to see, next followed[…]
    1. (Tyneside) A packed lunch.
    2. (East Anglia) A small meal taken mid-morning while farming.
    3. (Northern England) A miner’s packed meal.
    4. A light or hasty luncheon.
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • Todd’s Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[3]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To attract with bait; to entice.
  2. (transitive) To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
    • a crooked pin [] baited with a vile earthworm
Translations
Usage notes
  • This verb is sometimes confused in writing with the rare verb bate, which is pronounced identically; in particular, the expression with bated breath is frequently misspelled *with baited breath by writers unfamiliar with the verb bate.

Etymology 2

From Middle English bayten, baiten, beiten, from Old Norse beita (to bait, cause to bite, feed, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną (to cause to bite, bridle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with Icelandic beita (to bait), Swedish beta (to bait, pasture, graze), German beizen (to cause to bite, bait), Old English bǣtan (to bait, hunt, bridle, bit).

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.
    to bait a bear with dogs;  to bait a bull
  2. (transitive) To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 1, p. 12,[4]
      The Sunne that measures heauen all day long,
      At night doth baite his steedes the Ocean waues emong.
  4. (intransitive) (of a horse or other animal) To take food, especially during a journey.
  5. (intransitive) (of a person) To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes, in Paradise Regain’d, to which is added Samson Agonistes, London: John Starkey, p. 89, line 539,[5]
      For evil news rides post, while good news baits.
    • 1677, John Evelyn, Diary entry for 13 September, 1677, in Memoirs of John Evelyn, London: Henry Colburn, 1827, Volume 2, p. 433,[6]
      My Lord’s coach convey’d me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket, stepping in at Audley End to see that house againe, I slept at Bishops Strotford, and the next day home.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 62,[7]
      At Break of Day we arose, and after a short Repast march’d on till Noon, when we baited among some shady Trees near a Pond of Water []
See also
  • Baiting on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3

French battre de l’aile or des ailes, to flap or flutter.

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.

Etymology 4

Etymology unknown.

Adjective

bait (comparative more bait, superlative most bait)

  1. (MLE) Obvious; blatant.
  2. (MLE) Well-known; famous; renowned.
Synonyms
  • (obvious): See also Thesaurus:obvious
  • (well-known): See also Thesaurus:famous

Anagrams

  • IBAT, a bit, bati, tabi

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German wīt, from Old High German wīt, from Proto-Germanic *wīdaz (wide, broad). Cognate with German weit, Dutch wijd, English wide, Icelandic víður.

Adjective

bait (comparative baitor, superlative dar baitorste) (Sette Comuni, Luserna)

  1. wide, broad
  2. distant, far

Declension

Synonyms

  • (distant): bèrre

Derived terms

  • baitekhot

References

  • “bait” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay bait, from Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈba.ɪt̪̚]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧it

Noun

bait (plural bait-bait, first-person possessive baitku, second-person possessive baitmu, third-person possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)
    Synonyms: untai, kuplet

Affixed terms

Further reading

  • “bait” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Malay

Pronunciation

  • (Johor-Selangor) IPA(key): /baet/
  • (Riau-Lingga) IPA(key): /baɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aet, -et

Etymology 1

From Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

Noun

bait (Jawi spelling بيت‎, plural baitbait, informal 1st possessive baitku, impolite 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)

Descendants

  • Indonesian: bait

Etymology 2

From English byte.

Noun

bait (Jawi spelling باءيت‎, plural baitbait, informal 1st possessive baitku, impolite 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. byte

Further reading

  • “bait” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Middle English

Noun

bait

  1. Alternative form of bayte

Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧it
  • IPA(key): /baˈʔit/, [bɐˈʔit]

Noun

baít

  1. kindness
    Synonyms: kabaitan, kabutihang-loob, kagandahang-loob
  2. senses; clear state of mind
    Synonyms: sentido, sentido-komun, huwisyo, isip
  3. prudence; cautiousness
    Synonyms: timpi, pigil
  4. docility; domesticity

Derived terms


Welsh

Alternative forms

  • baet

Verb

bait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect subjunctive of bod

Synonyms

  • byddit
  • byddet

Mutation


English

Etymology

From Middle English hoke, from Old English hōc, from Proto-West Germanic *hōk, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz, variant of *hakô (hook), probably ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (peg, hook, claw).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ho͝ok, IPA(key): /hʊk/
  • (sometimes in Northern England, otherwise obsolete) enPR: ho͞ok IPA(key): /huːk/
  • Rhymes: -ʊk

Noun

hook (plural hooks)

  1. A rod bent into a curved shape, typically with one end free and the other end secured to a rope or other attachment.
  2. A barbed metal hook used for fishing; a fishhook.
  3. Any of various hook-shaped agricultural implements such as a billhook.
  4. The curved needle used in the art of crochet.
  5. The part of a hinge which is fixed to a post, and on which a door or gate hangs and turns.
  6. A loop shaped like a hook under certain written letters, for example, g and j.
  7. A tie-in to a current event or trend that makes a news story or editorial relevant and timely.
  8. A snare; a trap.
  9. (in the plural) The projecting points of the thighbones of cattle; called also hook bones.
  10. (informal) Removal or expulsion from a group or activity.
  11. (agriculture) A field sown two years in succession.
  12. (authorship) A brief, punchy opening statement intended to get attention from an audience, reader, or viewer, and make them want to continue to listen to a speech, read a book, or watch a play.
  13. (narratology) A gimmick or element of a creative work intended to be attention-grabbing for the audience; a compelling idea for a story that will be sure to attract people’s attention.
  14. (bridge, slang) A finesse.
  15. (card games, slang) A jack (the playing card).
  16. (geography) A spit or narrow cape of sand or gravel turned landward at the outer end, such as Sandy Hook in New Jersey.
  17. (music) A catchy musical phrase which forms the basis of a popular song.
  18. (nautical, informal) A ship’s anchor.
  19. (programming) Part of a system’s operation that can be intercepted to change or augment its behaviour.
    Synonym: endpoint
    • 2015, Rachel Alt-Simmons, Agile by Design (page 182)
      In lieu of those unneeded hooks, write code to fail fast and prevent gaps from becoming a problem.
  20. (Scrabble) An instance of playing a word perpendicular to a word already on the board, adding a letter to the start or the end of the word to form a new word.
  21. (typography) a diacritical mark shaped like the upper part of a question mark, as in .
  22. (typography, rare) a háček.
    • 2003, Language Issues XV–XVIII, page 36
      Common diacritics in Slavonic language are the hook ˇ (as in haček – Czech for ‘hook’) and the stroke ´ (robić – Polish for ‘do/make’).
    • 2003, David Adams, The Song and Duet Texts of Antonín Dvořák, page 168
      In Czech, palatalization is normally indicated by the symbol ˇ, called haček or “hook.”
    • 2004, Keesing’s Record of World Events L:i–xii, page unknown
      In detailing the proposed shortening of the Czech Republic to Česko…the hook (hacek) erroneously appeared over the letter “e” instead of the “C”.
  23. Senses relating to sports.
    1. (baseball) A curveball.
    2. (basketball) a basketball shot in which the offensive player, usually turned perpendicular to the basket, gently throws the ball with a sweeping motion of his arm in an upward arc with a follow-through which ends over his head. Also called hook shot.
    3. (bowling) A ball that is rolled in a curved line.
    4. (boxing) a type of punch delivered with the arm rigid and partially bent and the fist travelling nearly horizontally mesially along an arc
    5. (cricket) A type of shot played by swinging the bat in a horizontal arc, hitting the ball high in the air to the leg side, often played to balls which bounce around head height.
    6. (golf) A golf shot that (for the right-handed player) curves unintentionally to the left. (See draw, slice, fade.)
  24. (Canada, Australia, military) Any of the chevrons denoting rank.
  25. (slang) A prostitute.
    Synonym: hooker
    • 1983, G. W. Levi Kamel, Downtown Street Hustlers (page 160)
      I was talkin’ to a couple of the ‘hooks’ (female prostitutes) I know.
  26. (Britain, slang, obsolete) A pickpocket.
    • 1885, Michael Davitt, Leaves from a Prison Diary (page 18)
      He preceded me to Dartmoor, where I found his fame even more loudly trumpeted than ever, especially by Manchester “hooks” (pickpockets), who boast of being the rivals of the “Cocks,” or Londoners, in the art of obtaining other people’s property without paying for it.
    • 2003, David W. Maurer, Whiz Mob: A Correlation of the Technical Argot of Pickpockets with Their Behavior Pattern (page 58)
      “Everybody’s a tool over there. Everybody’s a hook, except them four guys on the points of the compass. They are eight or ten strong over there.” But all professional pickpockets, however expert or however clumsy, operate on the basis of the situation just outlined.

Hyponyms

  • grappling hook

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

References

  • Weisenberg, Michael (2000) The Official Dictionary of Poker. MGI/Mike Caro University. Template:isbn

Verb

hook (third-person singular simple present hooks, present participle hooking, simple past and past participle hooked)

  1. (transitive) To attach a hook to.
  2. (transitive) To catch with a hook (hook a fish).
  3. (transitive) To work yarn into a fabric using a hook; to crochet.
  4. (transitive) To insert in a curved way reminiscent of a hook.
  5. (transitive) To ensnare or obligate someone, as if with a hook.
  6. (Britain, US, slang, archaic) To steal.
  7. (transitive) To connect (hook into, hook together).
  8. (usually in passive) To make addicted; to captivate.
  9. (cricket, golf) To play a hook shot.
  10. (rugby) To succeed in heeling the ball back out of a scrum (used particularly of the team’s designated hooker).
  11. (field hockey, ice hockey) To engage in the illegal maneuver of hooking (i.e., using the hockey stick to trip or block another player)
  12. (soccer) To swerve a ball; kick a ball so it swerves or bends.
  13. (intransitive, slang) To engage in prostitution.
  14. (Scrabble) To play a word perpendicular to another word by adding a single letter to the existing word.
  15. (bridge, slang) To finesse.
  16. (transitive) To seize or pierce with the points of the horns, as cattle in attacking enemies; to gore.
  17. (intransitive) To move or go with a sudden turn.

Derived terms

  • hooker
  • hook up

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Khoo, OHKO

Indonesian

Etymology

  • From Dutch hoek (corner, angle), from Middle Dutch hoec, huoc, from Old Dutch *huok, from Proto-Germanic *hōkaz (hook), from Proto-Indo-European *kog-, *keg-, *keng- (peg, hook, claw).
  • The hyper-correction influenced by the cognate English hook.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈhʊk̚]

Noun

hook (first-person possessive hookku, second-person possessive hookmu, third-person possessive hooknya)

  1. (colloquial) alternative form of huk (land or building at the corner).

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial