bait vs rally what difference

what is difference between bait and rally

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɪt/
  • Rhymes: -eɪt
  • Homophone: bate

Etymology 1

From Middle English bayte, bait, beite, from Old Norse beita (food, bait), from Proto-Germanic *baitō (that which is bitten, bait), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with German Beize (mordant, corrosive fluid; marinade; hunting), Old English bāt (that which can be bitten, food, bait). Related to bite.

Noun

bait (countable and uncountable, plural baits)

  1. Any substance, especially food, used in catching fish, or other animals, by alluring them to a hook, snare, trap, or net.
  2. Food containing poison or a harmful additive to kill animals that are pests.
  3. Anything which allures; something used to lure or entice someone or something into doing something
  4. A portion of food or drink, as a refreshment taken on a journey; also, a stop for rest and refreshment.
    • 1818, Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey, chapter 20 page 70
      The tediousness of a two hours’ bait at Petty-France, in which there was nothing to be done but to eat without being hungry, and loiter about without any thing to see, next followed[…]
    1. (Tyneside) A packed lunch.
    2. (East Anglia) A small meal taken mid-morning while farming.
    3. (Northern England) A miner’s packed meal.
    4. A light or hasty luncheon.
Derived terms
Translations
References
  • Newcastle 1970s, Scott Dobson and Dick Irwin, [2]
  • Frank Graham (1987) The New Geordie Dictionary, →ISBN
  • Northumberland Words, English Dialect Society, R. Oliver Heslop, 1893–4
  • Todd’s Geordie Words and Phrases, George Todd, Newcastle, 1977[3]
  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To attract with bait; to entice.
  2. (transitive) To affix bait to a trap or a fishing hook or fishing line.
    • a crooked pin [] baited with a vile earthworm
Translations
Usage notes
  • This verb is sometimes confused in writing with the rare verb bate, which is pronounced identically; in particular, the expression with bated breath is frequently misspelled *with baited breath by writers unfamiliar with the verb bate.

Etymology 2

From Middle English bayten, baiten, beiten, from Old Norse beita (to bait, cause to bite, feed, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *baitijaną (to cause to bite, bridle), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeyd- (to cleave, split, separate). Cognate with Icelandic beita (to bait), Swedish beta (to bait, pasture, graze), German beizen (to cause to bite, bait), Old English bǣtan (to bait, hunt, bridle, bit).

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (transitive) To set dogs on (an animal etc.) to bite or worry; to attack with dogs, especially for sport.
    to bait a bear with dogs;  to bait a bull
  2. (transitive) To intentionally annoy, torment, or threaten by constant rebukes or threats; to harass.
  3. (transitive, now rare) To feed and water (a horse or other animal), especially during a journey.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 1, p. 12,[4]
      The Sunne that measures heauen all day long,
      At night doth baite his steedes the Ocean waues emong.
  4. (intransitive) (of a horse or other animal) To take food, especially during a journey.
  5. (intransitive) (of a person) To stop to take a portion of food and drink for refreshment during a journey.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes, in Paradise Regain’d, to which is added Samson Agonistes, London: John Starkey, p. 89, line 539,[5]
      For evil news rides post, while good news baits.
    • 1677, John Evelyn, Diary entry for 13 September, 1677, in Memoirs of John Evelyn, London: Henry Colburn, 1827, Volume 2, p. 433,[6]
      My Lord’s coach convey’d me to Bury, and thence baiting at Newmarket, stepping in at Audley End to see that house againe, I slept at Bishops Strotford, and the next day home.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, p. 62,[7]
      At Break of Day we arose, and after a short Repast march’d on till Noon, when we baited among some shady Trees near a Pond of Water []
See also
  • Baiting on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 3

French battre de l’aile or des ailes, to flap or flutter.

Verb

bait (third-person singular simple present baits, present participle baiting, simple past and past participle baited)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To flap the wings; to flutter as if to fly; or to hover, as a hawk when she stoops to her prey.

Etymology 4

Etymology unknown.

Adjective

bait (comparative more bait, superlative most bait)

  1. (MLE) Obvious; blatant.
  2. (MLE) Well-known; famous; renowned.
Synonyms
  • (obvious): See also Thesaurus:obvious
  • (well-known): See also Thesaurus:famous

Anagrams

  • IBAT, a bit, bati, tabi

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German wīt, from Old High German wīt, from Proto-Germanic *wīdaz (wide, broad). Cognate with German weit, Dutch wijd, English wide, Icelandic víður.

Adjective

bait (comparative baitor, superlative dar baitorste) (Sette Comuni, Luserna)

  1. wide, broad
  2. distant, far

Declension

Synonyms

  • (distant): bèrre

Derived terms

  • baitekhot

References

  • “bait” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay bait, from Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈba.ɪt̪̚]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧it

Noun

bait (plural bait-bait, first-person possessive baitku, second-person possessive baitmu, third-person possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)
    Synonyms: untai, kuplet

Affixed terms

Further reading

  • “bait” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Malay

Pronunciation

  • (Johor-Selangor) IPA(key): /baet/
  • (Riau-Lingga) IPA(key): /baɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aet, -et

Etymology 1

From Arabic بَيْت(bayt), from Proto-Semitic *bayt-.

Noun

bait (Jawi spelling بيت‎, plural baitbait, informal 1st possessive baitku, impolite 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. house (abode)
  2. home (house or structure in which someone lives)
  3. (literature) couplet (a pair of lines in poetry)

Descendants

  • Indonesian: bait

Etymology 2

From English byte.

Noun

bait (Jawi spelling باءيت‎, plural baitbait, informal 1st possessive baitku, impolite 2nd possessive baitmu, 3rd possessive baitnya)

  1. byte

Further reading

  • “bait” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Middle English

Noun

bait

  1. Alternative form of bayte

Tagalog

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧it
  • IPA(key): /baˈʔit/, [bɐˈʔit]

Noun

baít

  1. kindness
    Synonyms: kabaitan, kabutihang-loob, kagandahang-loob
  2. senses; clear state of mind
    Synonyms: sentido, sentido-komun, huwisyo, isip
  3. prudence; cautiousness
    Synonyms: timpi, pigil
  4. docility; domesticity

Derived terms


Welsh

Alternative forms

  • baet

Verb

bait

  1. (literary) second-person singular imperfect subjunctive of bod

Synonyms

  • byddit
  • byddet

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹæ.li/
  • Rhymes: -æli

Etymology 1

From Middle French rallier (French rallier), from Old French ralier, from Latin prefix re- + ad + ligare (to bind; to ally).

Noun

rally (plural rallies)

  1. A public gathering or mass meeting that is not mainly a protest and is organized to inspire enthusiasm for a cause.
  2. A protest or demonstration for or against something, but often with speeches and often without marching, especially in North America.
  3. (squash (sport), table tennis, tennis, badminton) A sequence of strokes between serving and scoring a point.
  4. (motor racing) An event in which competitors drive through a series of timed special stages at intervals. The winner is the driver who completes all stages with the shortest cumulative time.
  5. (business, trading) A recovery after a decline in prices (said of the market, stocks, etc.)
Hyponyms
  • (increase in value): dead cat bounce
Translations

Verb

rally (third-person singular simple present rallies, present participle rallying, simple past and past participle rallied)

  1. To collect, and reduce to order, as troops dispersed or thrown into confusion; to gather again; to reunite.
  2. To come into orderly arrangement; to renew order, or united effort, as troops scattered or put to flight; to assemble; to unite.
    • 2019, Louise Taylor, Alex Morgan heads USA past England into Women’s World Cup final (in The Guardian, 2 July 2019)[1]
      The USA were dominant but, to England’s immense credit, they repeatedly rallied, refusing to fold. Indeed they could conceivably have gone in level at the interval had Naeher not made an acrobatic, stretching, fingertip save to divert Walsh’s 25-yard thunderbolt as it whizzed unerringly on its apparently inexorable trajectory towards the top corner.
    • The Grecians rally, and their powers unite.
    • 1663, John Tillotson, The Wisdom of being Religious
      Innumerable parts of matter chanced just then to rally together, and to form themselves into this new world.
  3. To collect one’s vital powers or forces; to regain health or consciousness; to recuperate.
  4. (business, trading) To recover strength after a decline in prices; — said of the market, stocks, etc.
Synonyms
  • (gather, unite, especially troops): muster
  • (increase in value): bounce back, rebound
Antonyms
  • (increase in value): decline
Derived terms
  • rallying point
Translations

Etymology 2

From French railler. See rail (to scoff).

Verb

rally (third-person singular simple present rallies, present participle rallying, simple past and past participle rallied)

  1. (transitive) To tease; to chaff good-humouredly.
    • Honeycomb [] rallies me after his way upon my country life.
    • 1713, John Gay, The Fan
      Strephon had long confessed his amorous pain / Which gay Corinna rallied with disdain.

Noun

rally (uncountable)

  1. Good-humoured raillery.

References

  • rally in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • Ryall

Czech

Noun

rally f

  1. rally (motor racing event)

Synonyms

  • rallye f

Italian

Etymology

From English rally.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛl.li/, /relˈli/**

Noun

rally m (invariable)

  1. rally event involving groups of people

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English rally

Noun

rally n (definite singular rallyet, indefinite plural rally or rallyer, definite plural rallya or rallyene)

  1. a rally (e.g. in motor sport)

References

  • “rally” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English rally

Noun

rally n (definite singular rallyet, indefinite plural rally, definite plural rallya)

  1. a rally (e.g. in motor sport)

References

  • “rally” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Noun

rally m (plural rallys)

  1. Alternative spelling of rali

Spanish

Etymology

From English rally.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrali/, [ˈra.li]

Noun

rally m (plural rallys)

  1. (motor racing) rally

Further reading

  • “rally” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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