balance vs counterbalance what difference

what is difference between balance and counterbalance

English

Alternative forms

  • balaunce (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English balaunce, from Middle French balance, from Late Latin *bilancia, from (accusative form of) Latin bilanx (two-scaled), from bi- + lanx (plate, scale).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæləns/
  • Rhymes: -æləns

Noun

balance (countable and uncountable, plural balances)

  1. (uncountable) A state in which opposing forces harmonise; equilibrium.
  2. (uncountable) Mental equilibrium; mental health; calmness, a state of remaining clear-headed and unperturbed.
  3. (literally or figuratively) Something of equal weight used to provide equilibrium; counterweight.
  4. A pair of scales.
  5. (uncountable) Awareness of both viewpoints or matters; neutrality; rationality; objectivity.
  6. (uncountable) The overall result of conflicting forces, opinions etc.; the influence which ultimately “weighs” more than others.
  7. (uncountable) Apparent harmony in art (between differing colours, sounds, etc.).
  8. (accounting) A list accounting for the debits on one side, and for the credits on the other.
  9. (accounting) The result of such a procedure; the difference between credit and debit of an account.
  10. (watchmaking) A device used to regulate the speed of a watch, clock etc.
  11. (law, business) The remainder.
  12. (obsolete, astrology) Libra.

Synonyms

  • (scales): pair of scales, set of scales, scales, weighing machine, weighbridge (for vehicles)
  • (equilibrium): equilibrium
  • (support for both viewpoints): disinterest, even-handedness, fairness, impartiality, neutrality, nonpartisanship
  • (list of credits and debits): account

Antonyms

  • (equilibrium): nonequilibrium, imbalance, unbalance
  • (support for both viewpoints): bias, favor/favour, partiality, partisanship, prejudice, unfairness

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

balance (third-person singular simple present balances, present participle balancing, simple past and past participle balanced)

  1. (transitive) To bring (items) to an equipoise, as the scales of a balance by adjusting the weights.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make (concepts) agree.
    • 2014′, Peter Melville Logan, Olakunle George, Susan Hegeman, The Encyclopedia of the Novel
      the Proteus Principle helps to qualify and balance the concepts of narrators and of narrative situations as previously developed in classical studies by G erard Genette and Franz Stanzel.
  3. (transitive) To hold (an object or objects) precariously; to support on a narrow base, so as to keep from falling.
  4. (transitive) To compare in relative force, importance, value, etc.; to estimate.
  5. (transitive, dancing) To move toward, and then back from, reciprocally.
  6. (nautical) To contract, as a sail, into a narrower compass.
  7. (transitive) To make the credits and debits of (an account) correspond.
    • I am very well satisfied that it is not in my power to balance accounts with my Maker.
  8. (intransitive) To be in equilibrium.
  9. (intransitive) To have matching credits and debits.
  10. (transitive, obsolete) To weigh in a balance.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To hesitate or fluctuate.

Derived terms

  • balanced
  • balance out
  • balance the books

Translations

See also

  • balance on Wikiversity.Wikiversity

Anagrams

  • belacan

French

Etymology

From Vulgar Latin *bilancia, from Latin bilanx, from bi- (see Latin bis) and lanx.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.lɑ̃s/

Noun

balance f (plural balances)

  1. scales
  2. (chemistry, physics) balance
  3. (economics, electricity, politics) balance
  4. (fishing) drop-net
  5. (slang) informant, snitch
  6. (Louisiana) the rest, the remainder
  7. (Louisiana) a scale, more specifically a balancing scale

Derived terms

  • {{l|fr|mettre en balance
  • peser dans la balance

Related terms

  • balancer
  • balançoire

Verb

balance

  1. first-person singular present indicative of balancer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of balancer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of balancer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of balancer
  5. second-person singular imperative of balancer

Further reading

  • “balance” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • bancale

Latin

Noun

balance

  1. ablative singular of balanx

Middle English

Noun

balance

  1. Alternative form of balaunce

Middle French

Noun

balance f (plural balances)

  1. scales (weighing scales)

Portuguese

Verb

balance

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of balançar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of balançar
  3. third-person singular imperative of balançar

Spanish

Etymology

From Late Latin *bilancia, from Latin bilanx, from bi- (see Latin bis) and lanx.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): (Spain) /baˈlanθe/, [baˈlãn̟.θe]
  • IPA(key): (Latin America) /baˈlanse/, [baˈlãn.se]

Noun

balance m (plural balances)

  1. (accounting) balance
  2. balance; weighing up
    • 1988, Mecano, Un año más (written by Nacho Cano)
      Cinco minutos màs para la cuenta atrás
      Hacemos el balance de lo bueno y malo


English

Etymology

counter- +‎ balance.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌkaʊntə(ɹ)ˈbæləns/

Noun

counterbalance (plural counterbalances)

  1. (literally) A weight that is put in opposition to an equal weight so it keeps that in balance.
  2. (figuratively) A force or influence that balances, checks or limits an opposite one.

Synonyms

  • counterpoise
  • counterweight

Translations

Verb

counterbalance (third-person singular simple present counterbalances, present participle counterbalancing, simple past and past participle counterbalanced)

  1. (transitive) To apply weight in order to balance an opposing weight.
    • 1660, Robert Boyle, New Experiments Physico-Mechanical: Touching the Spring of the Air and their Effects
    Synonyms: counterpoise, equiponderate, counterweight
    Hypernym: offset
    Antonym: outweigh
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To match or equal in effect when applying opposing force
    Synonyms: counterpoise, counteract
    Antonyms: overcome, overpower

Translations


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