baldric vs baldrick what difference

what is difference between baldric and baldrick

English

Alternative forms

  • baldrick, baudrick, bauldrick, bawdrick

Etymology

From Old French baldre (sword-belt, crossbelt), probably from Latin balteus (belt) (said by Varro to be of Etruscan origin); possibly influenced by Middle High German balderich (of French origin). Compare French baudrier.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɔːldɹɪk/, [ˈbɔːɫdɹɪk]

Noun

baldric (plural baldrics)

  1. A belt used to hold a sword, sometimes richly ornamented, worn diagonally from shoulder to hip. [from c. 1300]
    • 1833, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lady of Shalott:
      As he rode down to Camelot:/And from his blazon’d baldric slung/A mighty silver bugle hung,/And as he rode his armor rung/Beside remote Shalott.
    • 1922, Author, The Museum Journal, Vol. XIII, The University Museum, page 168:
      The figure on the left, holding the severed head of the ox, has removed his sword with the baldric from which it is suspended and given it to his companion, who holds it beside his own with the baldric swinging.
    • 1998, Raymond E. Fiest, Krondor, the Betrayal, HarperCollins, page 16:
      The man facing Locklear had his head covered with a red bandanna, and over his shoulder was a baldric from which a cutlass at had hung.

Translations

References



English

Alternative forms

  • baldric, baudric, baudrick, bawdrick

Noun

baldrick (plural baldricks)

  1. A broad belt, sometimes richly ornamented, worn over one shoulder, across the breast, and under the opposite arm; less properly, any belt.
    • 1400?, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, line 2485.:
      And the bright green belt on his body he bore, oblique, like a baldrick, bound at his side below his left shoulder, laced in a knot…
    • 1598, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act I, Scene I, line 238:
      That a woman conceiv’d me, I thank her; that she brought me up, I likewise give her most humble thanks; but that I will have a rechate winded in my forehead, or hang my bugle in an invisible baldrick, all women shall pardon me.
    • 1800?, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, The Lady Of Shalott, part III, verse 2:
      And from his blazoned baldrick slung, a mighty silver bugle hung…

Translations


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