balk vs impediment what difference

what is difference between balk and impediment

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English balke, from Old English balca, either from or influenced by Old Norse bálkr (partition, ridge of land), from Proto-Germanic *balkô. Cognate with Dutch balk (balk), German Balken (balk), Italian balcone (balcony).

Alternative forms

  • baulk

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɔːk/, /bɔːlk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɔk/
  • (cotcaught merger, Inland Northern American) IPA(key): /bɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːk

Noun

balk (plural balks)

  1. (agriculture) An uncultivated ridge formed in the open field system, caused by the action of ploughing.
    • 1645, Thomas Fuller, Good Thoughts in Bad Times
      Bad ploughmen, which made balks of such ground.
  2. (archaeology) The wall of earth at the edge of an excavation.
  3. Beam, crossbeam; squared timber; a tie beam of a house, stretching from wall to wall, especially when laid so as to form a loft, “the balks”.
  4. A hindrance or disappointment; a check.
    • , “Concealment of Sin”
      a balk to the confidence of the bold undertaker
  5. A sudden and obstinate stop.
    Synonym: failure
  6. (obsolete) An omission.
  7. (sports) A deceptive motion.
    Synonym: feint
    1. (baseball) An illegal motion by the pitcher, intended to deceive a runner.
    2. (badminton) A motion used to deceive the opponent during a serve.
  8. (billiards) The area of the table lying behind the line from which the cue ball is initially shot, and from which a ball in hand must be played.
  9. (snooker) The area of the table lying behind the baulk line.
  10. (fishing) The rope by which fishing nets are fastened together.
Derived terms
  • baulk line
  • baulk end
Translations

Verb

balk (third-person singular simple present balks, present participle balking, simple past and past participle balked)

  1. (archaic) To pass over or by.
  2. To omit, miss, or overlook by chance.
    Synonyms: miss, overlook
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (obsolete) To miss intentionally; to avoid.
    Synonyms: avoid, shun, refuse, shirk
    • By reason of the contagion then in London, we balked the nns.
    • Sick he is, and keeps his bed, and balks his meat.
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Nymphidia
      Nor doth he any creature balk, / But lays on all he meeteth.
  4. To stop, check, block.
    • 1932, Aldous Huxley, Brave new world :
  5. To stop short and refuse to go on.
    • 1995, Temple Grandin, Thinking in Pictures, page 6:
  6. To refuse suddenly.
  7. To disappoint; to frustrate.
    Synonyms: frustrate, foil, baffle, thwart
    • 1821, Lord Byron, The Two Foscari
      They shall not balk my entrance.
  8. To engage in contradiction; to be in opposition.
  9. To leave or make balks in.
  10. To leave heaped up; to heap up in piles.
  11. (sports, intransitive) To make a deceptive motion to deceive another player.
    • 2013, Aaron Wisewell, The Baseball Coach
      The best advice you can receive regarding balking is to always maintain poise and composure on the mound.
Derived terms
  • balked landing
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from Dutch balken (to bray, bawl).

Verb

balk (third-person singular simple present balks, present participle balking, simple past and past participle balked)

  1. To indicate to fishermen, by shouts or signals from shore, the direction taken by the shoals of herring.

References

Anagrams

  • Blak, blak

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑlk/
  • Hyphenation: balk
  • Rhymes: -ɑlk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch balke, from Old Dutch *balco, from Proto-West Germanic *balkō, from Proto-Germanic *balkô.

Noun

balk m (plural balken, diminutive balkje n)

  1. A beam, solid support.
  2. (mathematics) A cuboid.
  3. A section, icon etcetera in such rectangular shape.
Derived terms
  • balkenbrij
  • dakbalk
  • draagbalk
  • evenwichtsbalk
  • staartbalk
  • stootbalk

– beam-shaped

  • notenbalk
  • taakbalk
  • zoekbalk
Related terms
  • balkon
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: balk
  • Negerhollands: balk
  • Papiamentu: balki (from the diminutive)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

balk

  1. first-person singular present indicative of balken
  2. imperative of balken

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish balker, from Old Norse bialki, bǫlkr, from Proto-Germanic *balkuz, from *balkô (beam, plank).

Noun

balk c

  1. a wooden or metal beam
  2. (heraldry) a bend (diagonal band)
  3. (law) code (major section of legislation)
    brottsbalk

    criminal code

Declension

Synonyms

  • bjälke

Derived terms



English

Etymology

From Middle English impediment, borrowed from Latin impedimentum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪmˈpɛdɪmənt/

Noun

impediment (plural impediments)

  1. A hindrance; that which impedes or obstructs progress.
    • 1549, The Booke of Common Prayer and Administracion of the Sacramentes, “Of Matrimonye,”[1]
      I require and charge you (as you will aunswere at the dreadefull daye of iudgemente, when the secretes of all hartes shalbee disclosed) that if either of you doe knowe any impedimente why ye maie not bee lawfully ioyned together in matrimonie, that ye confesse it.
    • c. 1592, William Shakespeare, Richard III, Act V, Scene 2,[2]
      Thus far into the bowels of the land
      Have we marched on without impediment.
    • 1720, Alexander Pope, letter to Robert Digby dated 20 July, 1720, in Mr. Pope’s Literary Correspondence for Thirty Years; from 1704 to 1734, London: E. Curll, 1735, p. 129,[3]
      Your kind Desire to know the State of my Health had not been unsatisfied of so long, had not that ill State been the Impediment.
    • 1993, Carol Shields, The Stone Diaries, Toronto: Random House of Canada, Chapter Two, p. 64,[5]
      Patterns incised on this mineral form seem to evade the eye; you have to stand at a certain distance, and in a particular light, to make them out. This impediment is part of the charm for him.
  2. A disability, especially one affecting the hearing or speech.
    Working in a noisy factory left me with a slight hearing impediment.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Mark 7.32,[6]
      And they bring unto him one that was deaf, and had an impediment in his speech; and they beseech him to put his hand upon him.
    • 1730, Joseph Addison, The Evidences of the Christian Religion, London: J. Tonson, Additional Discourses, Section 10, p. 308,[7]
      Let us suppose a person blind and deaf from his birth, who being grown to man’s estate, is by the Dead-palsy, or some other cause, deprived of his Feeling, Tasting, and Smelling; and at the same time has the impediment of his Hearing removed, and the film taken from his eyes []
    • 1858, Thomas Carlyle, History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Leipzig: Bernhard Tauchnitz, Volume 2, Book 5, Chapter 6, p. 9,[8]
      Better for you not to be tall! In fact it is almost a kindness of Heaven to be gifted with some safe impediment of body, slightly crooked back or the like, if you much dislike the career of honor under Friedrich Wilhelm.
    • 1931, Dashiell Hammett, The Glass Key, New York: Vintage, 1972, Chapter 3, p. 56,[9]
      [] Walter Ivans replied as rapidly as the impediment in his speech permitted.
  3. (chiefly in the plural) Baggage, especially that of an army; impedimenta.
    • 1913, Thomas McManus, “The Battle of Irish Bend” in The Twenty-Fifth Regiment Connecticut Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion, Rockville, Connecticut, p. 36,[10]
      We were all on foot, officers and men alike. Our horses, baggage, and impediments had been left at Brashear to follow the column of General Emory.

Synonyms

  • hindrance
  • obstruction
  • obstacle
  • See also Thesaurus:hindrance

Derived terms

Related terms

  • impede
  • impedimenta

Translations

References

  • John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “impediment”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “impediment”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

From Latin impedimentum

Noun

impediment n (plural impedimente)

  1. impediment

Declension


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