balk vs resist what difference

what is difference between balk and resist

English

Etymology 1

From Middle English balke, from Old English balca, either from or influenced by Old Norse bálkr (partition, ridge of land), from Proto-Germanic *balkô. Cognate with Dutch balk (balk), German Balken (balk), Italian balcone (balcony).

Alternative forms

  • baulk

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɔːk/, /bɔːlk/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɔk/
  • (cotcaught merger, Inland Northern American) IPA(key): /bɑk/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːk

Noun

balk (plural balks)

  1. (agriculture) An uncultivated ridge formed in the open field system, caused by the action of ploughing.
    • 1645, Thomas Fuller, Good Thoughts in Bad Times
      Bad ploughmen, which made balks of such ground.
  2. (archaeology) The wall of earth at the edge of an excavation.
  3. Beam, crossbeam; squared timber; a tie beam of a house, stretching from wall to wall, especially when laid so as to form a loft, “the balks”.
  4. A hindrance or disappointment; a check.
    • , “Concealment of Sin”
      a balk to the confidence of the bold undertaker
  5. A sudden and obstinate stop.
    Synonym: failure
  6. (obsolete) An omission.
  7. (sports) A deceptive motion.
    Synonym: feint
    1. (baseball) An illegal motion by the pitcher, intended to deceive a runner.
    2. (badminton) A motion used to deceive the opponent during a serve.
  8. (billiards) The area of the table lying behind the line from which the cue ball is initially shot, and from which a ball in hand must be played.
  9. (snooker) The area of the table lying behind the baulk line.
  10. (fishing) The rope by which fishing nets are fastened together.
Derived terms
  • baulk line
  • baulk end
Translations

Verb

balk (third-person singular simple present balks, present participle balking, simple past and past participle balked)

  1. (archaic) To pass over or by.
  2. To omit, miss, or overlook by chance.
    Synonyms: miss, overlook
    (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (obsolete) To miss intentionally; to avoid.
    Synonyms: avoid, shun, refuse, shirk
    • By reason of the contagion then in London, we balked the nns.
    • Sick he is, and keeps his bed, and balks his meat.
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Nymphidia
      Nor doth he any creature balk, / But lays on all he meeteth.
  4. To stop, check, block.
    • 1932, Aldous Huxley, Brave new world :
  5. To stop short and refuse to go on.
    • 1995, Temple Grandin, Thinking in Pictures, page 6:
  6. To refuse suddenly.
  7. To disappoint; to frustrate.
    Synonyms: frustrate, foil, baffle, thwart
    • 1821, Lord Byron, The Two Foscari
      They shall not balk my entrance.
  8. To engage in contradiction; to be in opposition.
  9. To leave or make balks in.
  10. To leave heaped up; to heap up in piles.
  11. (sports, intransitive) To make a deceptive motion to deceive another player.
    • 2013, Aaron Wisewell, The Baseball Coach
      The best advice you can receive regarding balking is to always maintain poise and composure on the mound.
Derived terms
  • balked landing
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from Dutch balken (to bray, bawl).

Verb

balk (third-person singular simple present balks, present participle balking, simple past and past participle balked)

  1. To indicate to fishermen, by shouts or signals from shore, the direction taken by the shoals of herring.

References

Anagrams

  • Blak, blak

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑlk/
  • Hyphenation: balk
  • Rhymes: -ɑlk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch balke, from Old Dutch *balco, from Proto-West Germanic *balkō, from Proto-Germanic *balkô.

Noun

balk m (plural balken, diminutive balkje n)

  1. A beam, solid support.
  2. (mathematics) A cuboid.
  3. A section, icon etcetera in such rectangular shape.
Derived terms
  • balkenbrij
  • dakbalk
  • draagbalk
  • evenwichtsbalk
  • staartbalk
  • stootbalk

– beam-shaped

  • notenbalk
  • taakbalk
  • zoekbalk
Related terms
  • balkon
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: balk
  • Negerhollands: balk
  • Papiamentu: balki (from the diminutive)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

balk

  1. first-person singular present indicative of balken
  2. imperative of balken

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Swedish balker, from Old Norse bialki, bǫlkr, from Proto-Germanic *balkuz, from *balkô (beam, plank).

Noun

balk c

  1. a wooden or metal beam
  2. (heraldry) a bend (diagonal band)
  3. (law) code (major section of legislation)
    brottsbalk

    criminal code

Declension

Synonyms

  • bjälke

Derived terms



English

Etymology

From Middle English resisten, from Old French resistre, Middle French resister, and their source, Latin resistere, from re- + sistere (cause to stand).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹɪˈzɪst/, /ɹəˈzɪst/
  • Rhymes: -ɪst
  • Hyphenation: re‧sist

Verb

resist (third-person singular simple present resists, present participle resisting, simple past and past participle resisted)

  1. (transitive) To attempt to counter the actions or effects of.
  2. (transitive) To withstand the actions of.
  3. (intransitive) To oppose.
  4. (transitive, obsolete) To be distasteful to.
    • 1608, William Shakespeare, Pericles, Prince of Tyre, II. iii. 29:
      These cates resist me,

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the gerund (-ing). See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Derived terms

  • resistance
  • resistless

Synonyms

  • gainstay
  • oppose
  • withset

Antonyms

  • obey
  • submit

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

resist (countable and uncountable, plural resists)

  1. A protective coating or covering.

Translations

Derived terms

  • resist work

References

Anagrams

  • Istres, Reists, Sister, reists, resits, restis, risest, sister

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