ball vs egg what difference

what is difference between ball and egg

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bôl, IPA(key): /bɔːl/
  • (Canada, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /bɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl
  • Homophone: bawl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bal, ball, balle, from Old English *beall, *bealla (round object, ball) or Old Norse bǫllr (a ball), both from Proto-Germanic *balluz, *ballô (ball), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoln- (bubble), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, inflate, swell). Cognate with Old Saxon ball, Dutch bal, Old High German bal, ballo (German Ball (ball); Ballen (bale)). Related forms in Romance are borrowings from Germanic. See also balloon, bale.

Noun

ball (countable and uncountable, plural balls)

  1. A solid or hollow sphere, or roughly spherical mass.
    1. A quantity of string, thread, etc., wound into a spherical shape.
    2. (ballistics, firearms) A solid, spherical nonexplosive missile for a cannon, rifle, gun, etc.
      1. A jacketed non-expanding bullet, typically of military origin.
      2. (uncountable, obsolete) Such bullets collectively.
        • 1659, Arthur Annesley, 1st Earl of Anglesey, England’s Confusion, London, p. 7,[1]
          [] the Good Old Cause, which, as they seemed to represent it, smelt of Gunpowder and ball []
        • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, p. 294,[2]
          I gave each of them a Musket with a Firelock on it, and about eight Charges of Powder and Ball, charging them to be very good Husbands of both, and not to use either of them but upon urgent Occasion.
        • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 148,[3]
          [] some headstrong Maroons were using a soldier of Captain Craskell’s ill, and compelling him to write to his commander, that it was too late to do any thing good, and that they wanted nothing, having got plenty of powder and ball []
    3. A roundish protuberant portion of some part of the body.
    4. (anatomy) The front of the bottom of the foot, just behind the toes.
    5. The globe; the earthly sphere.
      • c. 1712′, Joseph Addison, Ode to the Creator of the World
        What, though in solemn Silence, all
        Move round the dark terrestrial Ball!
      • 1717, Alexander Pope, “Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady”
        Thus, if eternal Justice rules the ball, / Thus shall your wives, and thus your children fall;
    6. (mathematics) The set of points in a metric space lying within a given distance (the radius) of a given point; specifically, the homologue of the disk in a Euclidean space of any number of dimensions.
    7. (mathematics, more generally) The set of points in a topological space lying within some open set containing a given point; the analogue of the disk in a Euclidean space.
    8. An object, generally spherical, used for playing games in which it may be thrown, caught, kicked, etc.
  2. (sports) A round or ellipsoidal object.
    1. Any sport or game involving a ball.
    2. (baseball) A pitch that falls outside of the strike zone.
    3. (pinball) An opportunity to launch the pinball into play.
    4. (cricket) A single delivery by the bowler, six of which make up an over.
    5. (soccer) A pass; a kick of the football towards a teammate.
  3. (mildly vulgar, slang, usually in the plural) A testicle.
    1. (in the plural) Nonsense.
    2. (in the plural) Courage.
  4. (printing, historical) A leather-covered cushion, fastened to a handle called a ballstock; formerly used by printers for inking the form, then superseded by the roller.
  5. (farriery, historical) A large pill, a form in which medicine was given to horses; a bolus.
    • 1842, James White, A compendium of the veterinary art
      The laxative alterative has not this advantage, the aloes, of which it is composed, being extremely bitter, and therefore requiring to be given in the form of a ball.
Synonyms
  • sphere
  • globe
  • (testicle): See Thesaurus:testicle
  • (nonsense): See Thesaurus:nonsense
  • (courage): chutzpah, guts, nerve
Derived terms

(solid or hollow sphere):

(testicle):

Translations

Verb

ball (third-person singular simple present balls, present participle balling, simple past and past participle balled)

  1. (transitive) To form or wind into a ball.
    Synonyms: roll up, wad
  2. (metalworking) To heat in a furnace and form into balls for rolling.
  3. (transitive, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse with.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:copulate with
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To gather balls which cling to the feet, as of damp snow or clay; to gather into balls.
  5. (slang, usually in present participle) To be hip or cool.
  6. (nonstandard, slang) To play basketball.
  7. (transitive) To punish by affixing a ball and chain.
    • 1865, Camp Sumpter, Andersonville National Historic Site, Rules and Regulations of the Prison
      any man refusing to do police duty will be punished by the sergts by balling him the rest of the day.
Translations

Interjection

ball

  1. (Australian rules football) An appeal by the crowd for holding the ball against a tackled player. This is heard almost any time an opposition player is tackled, without regard to whether the rules about “prior opportunity” to dispose of the ball are fulfilled.

Etymology 2

From Middle French bal, from Middle French baler (to dance), from Old French baller, from Late Latin ballō (to dance).

Noun

ball (plural balls)

  1. A formal dance.
  2. (informal) A very enjoyable time.
    Synonyms: blast, whale of a time
  3. A competitive event among young African-American and Latin American LGBTQ+ people in which prizes are awarded for drag and similar performances. See ball culture.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • ballad
  • ballade
Translations

Catalan

Etymology

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbaʎ/
  • Rhymes: -aʎ

Noun

ball m (plural balls)

  1. dance
  2. ball, formal dance

Synonyms

  • dansa

Derived terms

  • ball de bastons

Related terms

  • ballar

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from French balle (ball).

Noun

ball

  1. estimation, score

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[5], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Icelandic

Etymology

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /palː/
  • Rhymes: -alː

Noun

ball n (genitive singular balls, nominative plural böll)

  1. dance

Declension


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish ball, from Proto-Celtic *ballos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, swell, inflate); compare English ball, Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): /bˠəul̪ˠ/
  • (Galway) IPA(key): /bˠɑːl̪ˠ/
  • (Mayo) IPA(key): /bˠal̪ˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /bˠal̪ˠ/

Noun

ball m (genitive singular baill, nominative plural baill)

  1. (anatomy) organ
  2. component part
  3. member
  4. article
  5. spot, place
  6. spot, mark
  7. (sets) element, member

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “ball” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English *beall.

Noun

ball

  1. Alternative form of bal

Etymology 2

Probably from Old French bale.

Noun

ball

  1. Alternative form of bale (bale)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫllr.

Noun

ball m (definite singular ballen, indefinite plural baller, definite plural ballene)

  1. ball (solid or hollow sphere)
  2. ball (object, usually spherical, used for playing games)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun

ball n (definite singular ballet, indefinite plural ball or baller, definite plural balla or ballene)

  1. ball (formal social occasion involving dancing)
Derived terms
  • ballkjole
  • ballsal

References

  • “ball” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫllr.

Noun

ball m (definite singular ballen, indefinite plural ballar, definite plural ballane)

  1. a ball (solid or hollow sphere)
  2. a ball (object, usually spherical, used for playing games)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun

ball n (definite singular ballet, indefinite plural ball, definite plural balla)

  1. ball (formal social occasion involving dancing)
Derived terms
  • ballkjole
  • ballsal

References

  • “ball” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *ballos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bal͈/

Noun

ball m

  1. a body part
  2. member of a group
  3. part, portion
  4. a colored spot

Declension

Descendants

  • Irish: ball
  • Scottish Gaelic: ball

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish ball m (limb, member, organ; member of community; part, portion, piece; article, object; place, spot; passage (of a book); spot, mark, blemish) (compare Irish ball), from Proto-Celtic *ballo-, from Proto-Indo-European *bhel- (to blow, swell, inflate) (compare English ball, Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paul̪ˠ/

Noun

ball m (genitive singular buill, plural buill)

  1. ball
  2. member (of a group)
  3. article, item
  4. (anatomy) organ; limb

Derived terms

  • ball-coise (football, soccer)
  • ball-basgaid (basketball)
  • ball-beusa (baseball)
  • ball-stèidhe (baseball)
  • ball-bholaidh (volleyball)
  • ball-goilf (golf ball)
  • Ball Pàrlamaid, BP (Member of Parliament, MP)
  • ballrachd (membership)
  • BPA

Mutation

References

  • “ball” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbalː/

Adjective

ball

  1. (slang) cool, hip, fun, entertaining
    Synonym: cool

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: ĕg, IPA(key): /ɛɡ/
  • (also) enPR: āg, IPA(key): /eɪɡ/ (some Canadian and US accents)
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ

Etymology 1

From Middle English egge, from Old Norse egg (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg) (by Holtzmann’s law), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg). Cognate with Icelandic egg (egg), Faroese egg (egg), Norwegian egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg).

The native English ey (plural eyren), akin to Dutch ei (plural eieren) and German Ei (plural Eier) are ultimately from the same Proto-Germanic root, survived into the 16th century before being fully displaced by egg. More at ey.

Alternative forms

  • egge (obsolete)

Noun

egg (plural eggs)

  1. (zoology, countable) An approximately spherical or ellipsoidal body produced by birds, reptiles, insects and other animals, housing the embryo during its development.
  2. (countable, uncountable) The egg of a domestic fowl (especially a hen) or its contents, used as food.
  3. (biology, countable) The female primary cell, the ovum.
  4. Anything shaped like an egg, such as an Easter egg or a chocolate egg.
  5. A swelling on one’s head, usually large or noticeable, associated with an injury.
  6. (slang, mildly derogatory, potentially offensive) A Caucasian who behaves as if they were (East) Asian (from being “white” outside and “yellow” inside).
  7. (New Zealand, derogatory) A foolish or obnoxious person.
  8. (archaic, derogatory) A young person.
    • Template:Shakespeare Hamlet
  9. (informal) A person, fellow.
    • 1980, Stephen King, The Wedding Gig
      Up close he looked like a pretty tough egg. His hair was bristling up in the back in spite of what smelled like a whole bottle of Wildroot Creme Oil and he had the flat, oddly shiny eyes that some deep-sea fish have.
  10. (LGBT, slang) A person who is regarded as having not yet realized they are transgender, has not yet come out, or is in the early stages of transitioning.
    • 2018, Casey Plett, Little Fish (→ISBN), page 24:
      That fits, though, she thought. Wear the same outfit day after day, your brain gets numb to how it looks or feels—Wendy shut the album. No. [] She hated analyzing the whys of [not-out] trans girls. She had always hated it, and she hated how easy it had become; the bottomless hole of egg mode.
  11. (computing) One of the blocks of data injected into a program’s address space for use by certain forms of shellcode, such as “omelettes”.
    • 2015, Herbert Bos, Fabian Monrose, Gregory Blanc, Research in Attacks, Intrusions, and Defenses: 18th International Symposium
      This approach would be altered for an optimal omelette based exploit. One would spray the heap with the omelette code solely, then load a single copy of the additional shellcode eggs into memory outside the target region for the spray.
  12. (Internet slang, derogatory) A user of the microblogging service Twitter who has the default egg avatar rather than a custom picture.
Synonyms
  • oeuf (humorous)
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Jamaican Creole: eg
  • Sranan Tongo: eksi
Translations

See egg/translations § Noun.

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. To throw eggs at.
  2. (cooking) To dip in or coat with beaten egg.
  3. To distort a circular cross-section (as in a tube) to an elliptical or oval shape, either inadvertently or intentionally.
    After I cut the tubing, I found that I had slightly egged it in the vise.
Translations

See also

  • caviar
  • roe

Etymology 2

From Middle English eggen, from Old Norse eggja (to incite), from egg (edge).

Verb

egg (third-person singular simple present eggs, present participle egging, simple past and past participle egged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete except in egg on) To encourage, incite.
    • 14th c., William Langland, Piers Plowman, Passus 1,[1]
      Þerinne wonieth a wiȝte · þat wronge is yhote
      Fader of falshed · and founded it hym-selue
      Adam and Eue · he egged to ille
      Conseilled caym · to kullen his brother
    • 1571, Arthur Golding, The Psalmes of David and others. With M. John Calvins Commentaries, “Epistle Dedicatorie,”[2]
      [] yit have wee one thing in our selves and of our selves (even originall sinne, concupiscence or lust) which never ceaseth too egge us and allure us from God []
Derived terms
  • egg on
  • over-egg
Translations

Further reading

  • egg on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • (transgender): Morgan Lev Edward Holleb, The A-Z of Gender and Sexuality: From Ace to Ze (2019, →ISBN), page 98

Anagrams

  • GGE, Geg, geg

Faroese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɛkː]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive singular egs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From the Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. blade, edge
  2. border, edge of a cliff
Declension

German

Pronunciation

Verb

egg

  1. singular imperative of eggen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of eggen

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛkː/
  • Rhymes: -ɛkː

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Cognate with Old English ǣġ (obsolete English ey); Swedish ägg; Old High German ei (German Ei).

Noun

egg n (genitive singular eggs, nominative plural egg)

  1. (zoology) an egg
  2. an oval shaped object
  3. the ovum
Declension
Synonyms
  • (ovum): eggfruma f
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Cognates include Old Frisian egg, Old Saxon eggia, Dutch egge; Old English ecg (English edge); Old High German egga (German Ecke); Swedish egg.

The Indo-European root is also the source of Latin aciēs (edge, sharpness), Ancient Greek ἀκίς (akís, point).

Noun

egg f (genitive singular eggjar, nominative plural eggjar)

  1. (weaponry) the sharp edge of a knife, sword, or similar
  2. a sharp edge on a mountain
Declension
Synonyms
  • (sharp edge): blað
  • (mountain): fjallsegg
Derived terms
  • fjallsegg
  • með oddi og egg/með oddi og eggju

Middle English

Noun

egg

  1. Alternative form of egge (egg)

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɛɡ
  • Hyphenation: egg

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją (egg), from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg), likely from *h₂éwis (bird), possibly from *h₂ew- (to enjoy, consume).

Cognate with English egg (egg), Icelandic egg (egg), Faroese egg (egg), Swedish ägg (egg), Danish æg (egg).

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga or eggene)

  1. an egg
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular egga or eggen, indefinite plural egger, definite plural eggene)

  1. (cutting) edge (e.g. of a knife)
Derived terms
  • tveegget

References

  • “egg” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “egg_1” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • “egg_2” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /eɡː/, /ɛɡː/ (example of pronunciation)

Etymology 1

From Old Norse egg n, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm. Akin to English egg.

Noun

egg n (definite singular egget, indefinite plural egg, definite plural egga)

  1. an egg
Inflection

Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Old Norse egg f, from Proto-Germanic *agjō f (edge, corner), and ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *h₂eḱ-. Cognates include English edge and German Ecke.

Noun

egg f or m (definite singular eggen or egga, indefinite plural eggar or egger, definite plural eggane or eggene)

  1. an edge (the thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument, such as an ax, knife, sword, or scythe)
  2. (geology) an arête
Inflection

References

  • “egg” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Noun

egg n (genitive eggs, plural egg)

  1. egg
Declension
Descendants

Etymology 2

From Proto-Germanic *agjō. Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp).

Noun

egg f (genitive eggjar, plural eggjar)

  1. edge (of a blade)
Declension
Descendants

References

  • Zoëga, Geir T. (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic[3], Oxford: Clarendon Press

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *agjō, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eḱ- (sharp, pointed).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɛɡː/
  • Homophone: ägg

Noun

egg c

  1. The sharp edge of a cutting tool.

Declension

Related terms

References

  • egg in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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