ball vs nut what difference

what is difference between ball and nut

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bôl, IPA(key): /bɔːl/
  • (Canada, cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /bɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl
  • Homophone: bawl

Etymology 1

From Middle English bal, ball, balle, from Old English *beall, *bealla (round object, ball) or Old Norse bǫllr (a ball), both from Proto-Germanic *balluz, *ballô (ball), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoln- (bubble), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, inflate, swell). Cognate with Old Saxon ball, Dutch bal, Old High German bal, ballo (German Ball (ball); Ballen (bale)). Related forms in Romance are borrowings from Germanic. See also balloon, bale.

Noun

ball (countable and uncountable, plural balls)

  1. A solid or hollow sphere, or roughly spherical mass.
    1. A quantity of string, thread, etc., wound into a spherical shape.
    2. (ballistics, firearms) A solid, spherical nonexplosive missile for a cannon, rifle, gun, etc.
      1. A jacketed non-expanding bullet, typically of military origin.
      2. (uncountable, obsolete) Such bullets collectively.
        • 1659, Arthur Annesley, 1st Earl of Anglesey, England’s Confusion, London, p. 7,[1]
          [] the Good Old Cause, which, as they seemed to represent it, smelt of Gunpowder and ball []
        • 1719, Daniel Defoe, Robinson Crusoe, London: W. Taylor, p. 294,[2]
          I gave each of them a Musket with a Firelock on it, and about eight Charges of Powder and Ball, charging them to be very good Husbands of both, and not to use either of them but upon urgent Occasion.
        • 1803, Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, Letter 5, p. 148,[3]
          [] some headstrong Maroons were using a soldier of Captain Craskell’s ill, and compelling him to write to his commander, that it was too late to do any thing good, and that they wanted nothing, having got plenty of powder and ball []
    3. A roundish protuberant portion of some part of the body.
    4. (anatomy) The front of the bottom of the foot, just behind the toes.
    5. The globe; the earthly sphere.
      • c. 1712′, Joseph Addison, Ode to the Creator of the World
        What, though in solemn Silence, all
        Move round the dark terrestrial Ball!
      • 1717, Alexander Pope, “Elegy to the Memory of an Unfortunate Lady”
        Thus, if eternal Justice rules the ball, / Thus shall your wives, and thus your children fall;
    6. (mathematics) The set of points in a metric space lying within a given distance (the radius) of a given point; specifically, the homologue of the disk in a Euclidean space of any number of dimensions.
    7. (mathematics, more generally) The set of points in a topological space lying within some open set containing a given point; the analogue of the disk in a Euclidean space.
    8. An object, generally spherical, used for playing games in which it may be thrown, caught, kicked, etc.
  2. (sports) A round or ellipsoidal object.
    1. Any sport or game involving a ball.
    2. (baseball) A pitch that falls outside of the strike zone.
    3. (pinball) An opportunity to launch the pinball into play.
    4. (cricket) A single delivery by the bowler, six of which make up an over.
    5. (soccer) A pass; a kick of the football towards a teammate.
  3. (mildly vulgar, slang, usually in the plural) A testicle.
    1. (in the plural) Nonsense.
    2. (in the plural) Courage.
  4. (printing, historical) A leather-covered cushion, fastened to a handle called a ballstock; formerly used by printers for inking the form, then superseded by the roller.
  5. (farriery, historical) A large pill, a form in which medicine was given to horses; a bolus.
    • 1842, James White, A compendium of the veterinary art
      The laxative alterative has not this advantage, the aloes, of which it is composed, being extremely bitter, and therefore requiring to be given in the form of a ball.
Synonyms
  • sphere
  • globe
  • (testicle): See Thesaurus:testicle
  • (nonsense): See Thesaurus:nonsense
  • (courage): chutzpah, guts, nerve
Derived terms

(solid or hollow sphere):

(testicle):

Translations

Verb

ball (third-person singular simple present balls, present participle balling, simple past and past participle balled)

  1. (transitive) To form or wind into a ball.
    Synonyms: roll up, wad
  2. (metalworking) To heat in a furnace and form into balls for rolling.
  3. (transitive, vulgar) To have sexual intercourse with.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:copulate with
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To gather balls which cling to the feet, as of damp snow or clay; to gather into balls.
  5. (slang, usually in present participle) To be hip or cool.
  6. (nonstandard, slang) To play basketball.
  7. (transitive) To punish by affixing a ball and chain.
    • 1865, Camp Sumpter, Andersonville National Historic Site, Rules and Regulations of the Prison
      any man refusing to do police duty will be punished by the sergts by balling him the rest of the day.
Translations

Interjection

ball

  1. (Australian rules football) An appeal by the crowd for holding the ball against a tackled player. This is heard almost any time an opposition player is tackled, without regard to whether the rules about “prior opportunity” to dispose of the ball are fulfilled.

Etymology 2

From Middle French bal, from Middle French baler (to dance), from Old French baller, from Late Latin ballō (to dance).

Noun

ball (plural balls)

  1. A formal dance.
  2. (informal) A very enjoyable time.
    Synonyms: blast, whale of a time
  3. A competitive event among young African-American and Latin American LGBTQ+ people in which prizes are awarded for drag and similar performances. See ball culture.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • ballad
  • ballade
Translations

Catalan

Etymology

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbaʎ/
  • Rhymes: -aʎ

Noun

ball m (plural balls)

  1. dance
  2. ball, formal dance

Synonyms

  • dansa

Derived terms

  • ball de bastons

Related terms

  • ballar

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from French balle (ball).

Noun

ball

  1. estimation, score

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[5], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Icelandic

Etymology

From French bal (a dance)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /palː/
  • Rhymes: -alː

Noun

ball n (genitive singular balls, nominative plural böll)

  1. dance

Declension


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish ball, from Proto-Celtic *ballos, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, swell, inflate); compare English ball, Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis).

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): /bˠəul̪ˠ/
  • (Galway) IPA(key): /bˠɑːl̪ˠ/
  • (Mayo) IPA(key): /bˠal̪ˠ/
  • (Ulster) IPA(key): /bˠal̪ˠ/

Noun

ball m (genitive singular baill, nominative plural baill)

  1. (anatomy) organ
  2. component part
  3. member
  4. article
  5. spot, place
  6. spot, mark
  7. (sets) element, member

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “ball” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English *beall.

Noun

ball

  1. Alternative form of bal

Etymology 2

Probably from Old French bale.

Noun

ball

  1. Alternative form of bale (bale)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫllr.

Noun

ball m (definite singular ballen, indefinite plural baller, definite plural ballene)

  1. ball (solid or hollow sphere)
  2. ball (object, usually spherical, used for playing games)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun

ball n (definite singular ballet, indefinite plural ball or baller, definite plural balla or ballene)

  1. ball (formal social occasion involving dancing)
Derived terms
  • ballkjole
  • ballsal

References

  • “ball” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse bǫllr.

Noun

ball m (definite singular ballen, indefinite plural ballar, definite plural ballane)

  1. a ball (solid or hollow sphere)
  2. a ball (object, usually spherical, used for playing games)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French bal.

Noun

ball n (definite singular ballet, indefinite plural ball, definite plural balla)

  1. ball (formal social occasion involving dancing)
Derived terms
  • ballkjole
  • ballsal

References

  • “ball” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *ballos.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bal͈/

Noun

ball m

  1. a body part
  2. member of a group
  3. part, portion
  4. a colored spot

Declension

Descendants

  • Irish: ball
  • Scottish Gaelic: ball

Mutation

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Scottish Gaelic

Etymology

From Old Irish ball m (limb, member, organ; member of community; part, portion, piece; article, object; place, spot; passage (of a book); spot, mark, blemish) (compare Irish ball), from Proto-Celtic *ballo-, from Proto-Indo-European *bhel- (to blow, swell, inflate) (compare English ball, Ancient Greek φαλλός (phallós, penis)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /paul̪ˠ/

Noun

ball m (genitive singular buill, plural buill)

  1. ball
  2. member (of a group)
  3. article, item
  4. (anatomy) organ; limb

Derived terms

  • ball-coise (football, soccer)
  • ball-basgaid (basketball)
  • ball-beusa (baseball)
  • ball-stèidhe (baseball)
  • ball-bholaidh (volleyball)
  • ball-goilf (golf ball)
  • Ball Pàrlamaid, BP (Member of Parliament, MP)
  • ballrachd (membership)
  • BPA

Mutation

References

  • “ball” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “ball”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Swedish

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbalː/

Adjective

ball

  1. (slang) cool, hip, fun, entertaining
    Synonym: cool

Declension


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /nʌt/, enPR: nŭt
    • (California, General New Zealand, Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): [nɐt]
  • Rhymes: -ʌt

Etymology 1

From Middle English nute, note, from Old English hnutu, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts (nut) (compare West Frisian nút, Dutch noot, German Nuss, Danish nød, Swedish nöt, Norwegian nøtt), from Proto-Indo-European *knew- (compare Irish cnó, Latin nux (walnut)).

Noun

nut (plural nuts)

  1. A hard-shelled seed.
  2. A piece of metal, usually square or hexagonal in shape, with a hole through it having machined internal threads, intended to be screwed onto a bolt or other threaded shaft.
    Hypernym: fastener
    Hyponyms: acorn nut, barrel nut, square nut, wing nut
    • 1998, Brian Hingley, Furniture Repair & Refinishing – Page 95[1]
      As the bolt tightens into the nut, it pulls the tenon on the side rail into the mortise in the bedpost and locks them together. There are also some European beds that reverse the bolt and nut by setting the nut into the bedpost with the bolt inserted into a slotted area in the side of the rail.
  3. (slang) A crazy person.
    Synonyms: loony, nutbag, nutcase, nutter; see also Thesaurus:mad person
  4. (slang) The head.
    Synonyms: bonce, noodle
  5. (US, slang) Monthly expense to keep a venture running.
  6. (US, slang) The amount of money necessary to set up some venture; set-up costs.
    • 1971, Hunter S. Thompson, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Harper Perennial (2005), page 11:
      My attorney was waiting in a bar around the corner. “This won’t make the nut,” he said, “unless we have unlimited credit.”
  7. (US, slang) A stash of money owned by an extremely rich investor, sufficient to sustain a high level of consumption if all other money is lost.
  8. (music, lutherie) On stringed instruments such as guitars and violins, the small piece at the peghead end of the fingerboard that holds the strings at the proper spacing and, in most cases, the proper height.
  9. (typography slang) En, a unit of measurement equal to half of the height of the type in use.
  10. (dated, Britain, slang) An extravagantly fashionable young man. [1910s-1920s]
    • 1914, “Saki”, ‘The Dreamer’, Beasts and Superbeasts, Penguin 2000 (Complete Short Stories), p. 323:
      ‘You are not going to be what they call a Nut, are you?’ she inquired with some anxiety, partly with the idea that a Nut would be an extravagance which her sister’s small household would scarcely be justified in incurring […].
  11. (vulgar, slang, chiefly plural) A testicle.
    Synonyms: ball, (taboo slang) bollock, nads
  12. (vulgar, slang, uncountable) Semen, ejaculate.
  13. (vulgar, slang, countable) Orgasm, ejaculation; especially release of semen.
    • 2020, Dontavious Robinson, Gangster Mission Part One, Page Publishing, Inc (→ISBN)
      [] feelin’ her pussy grippin’ his dick as her nut lubricated him []
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.
  14. (colloquial) An extreme enthusiast.
  15. (climbing) A shaped piece of metal, threaded by a wire loop, which is jammed in a crack in the rockface and used to protect a climb. (Originally, machine nuts [sense #2] were used for this purpose.)
    • 2005, Tony Lourens, Guide to climbing page 88
      When placing nuts, always look for constrictions within the crack, behind which the nut can be wedged.
  16. (poker, only in attributive use) The best possible hand of a certain type, for instance: “nut straight”, “nut flush”, and “nut full house”. Compare nuts (the best possible hand available).
  17. (firearms) The tumbler of a gunlock.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  18. (nautical) A projection on each side of the shank of an anchor, to secure the stock in place.
  19. (archaic) A small rounded cake or cookie.
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

nut (third-person singular simple present nuts, present participle nutting, simple past and past participle nutted or (nonstandard) nut)

  1. (mostly in the form “nutting”) To gather nuts.
  2. (Britain, transitive, slang) To hit deliberately with the head; to headbutt.
    Synonyms: butt, Glasgow kiss, Liverpool kiss, loaf
  3. (slang, mildly vulgar) To orgasm; to ejaculate.
    Synonyms: blow a nut, bust a nut; see also Thesaurus:ejaculate
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:nut.

Etymology 2

Interjection

nut

  1. (Scotland, colloquial) No.
    • 1995, Alan Warner, Morvern Callar, Vintage 2015, p. 26:
      Did you like them boys? I goes.
      Nut. She shook her hair.
      Neither?
      Nut. Right townies.

Anagrams

  • NTU, Tun, tun

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [nʊ̠t]

Noun

nut (plural [please provide])

  1. use, benefit

References

  • 2007. The UCLA Phonetics Lab Archive. Los Angeles, CA: UCLA Department of Linguistics.

Dutch

Etymology

From the adjective Middle Dutch nutte (useful), or from Middle Dutch nut (yield), from Old Dutch *nut, from Proto-Germanic *nutją, *nutjō (profit, yield, utility), from Proto-Indo-European *newd- (to seize; grasp; use).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nʏt/
  • Hyphenation: nut
  • Rhymes: -ʏt

Noun

nut n (uncountable)

  1. use, point, utility, sense
    Synonym: zin
  2. benefit
    Synonym: voordeel

Derived terms

  • Nutsman
  • nuttig
  • nutteloos

Adjective

nut (comparative nutter, superlative nutst)

  1. (obsolete) useful
    Synonym: nuttig

Inflection

Derived terms

  • onnut

Middle English

Adverb

nut

  1. Alternative form of not

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nuter, definite plural nutene)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hnútr.

Noun

nut m (definite singular nuten, indefinite plural nutar, definite plural nutane)

  1. a tall, rounded mountain top

References

  • “nut” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Swedish

Alternative forms

  • not

Etymology

From Old Norse hnot, from Proto-Germanic *hnuts.

Noun

nut f

  1. nut

Declension

Descendants

  • Swedish: nöt

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nut/

Noun

nut f

  1. genitive plural of nuta

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /nʌʔ/

Interjection

nut

  1. (South Scots) no; used to show disagreement or negation.

Unua

Noun

nut

  1. Alternative form of naut

Further reading

  • Elizabeth Pearce, A Grammar of Unua (2015)

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