ballista vs onager what difference

what is difference between ballista and onager

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin ballista, from Ancient Greek βαλλίστρα (ballístra), from βάλλω (bállō, I throw).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bəˈlɪstə/

Noun

ballista (plural ballistas or ballistae or ballistæ)

  1. (weaponry, historical) An ancient military engine, in the form of a crossbow, used for hurling large missiles.

Translations

See also

  • catapult

Finnish

Etymology

< Latin

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑlːistɑ/, [ˈbɑlːis̠t̪ɑ]
  • Rhymes: -ɑlːistɑ
  • Syllabification: bal‧lis‧ta

Noun

ballista

  1. ballista (military engine)

Declension

See also

  • varsijousi
  • ballista on the Finnish Wikipedia.Wikipedia fi

Latin

Alternative forms

  • balista
  • ballistra

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βαλλίστρα (ballístra), from βάλλω (bállō, I throw).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /balˈlis.ta/, [bälˈlʲɪs̠t̪ä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /balˈlis.ta/, [bɑlˈlist̪ɑ]
  • Homophone: Ballista

Noun

ballista f (genitive ballistae); first declension

  1. ballista

Declension

First-declension noun.

Derived terms

  • arcuballista
  • ballistārius
  • ballistica
  • carroballista

Descendants

See also

  • catapulta
  • onager

References

  • ballista in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ballista in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ballista in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • ballista in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • ballista in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ballista in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin


English

Etymology

From Middle English onager, onagir (wild ass; military catapult), from Anglo-Norman onager, Middle French onager, onagre, Old French onager, onagre (wild ass; military catapult) (modern French onagre), from Late Latin onager (large siege engine), Latin onager (wild ass), from Hellenistic Ancient Greek ὄναγρος (ónagros, wild ass), Byzantine Ancient Greek ὄναγρος (ónagros, large siege engine), from ὄνος (ónos, ass) + ἄγριος (ágrios, wild) (from ᾰ̓γρός (agrós, countryside; field) (possibly ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₂eǵ- (to drive)) + -ῐος (-ios, suffix forming adjectives)).

The “military engine” sense alludes to the strong recoil of the engine, likened to an onager’s kick; see the 2007 quotation.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɒnədʒə/, /-ɡə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɑnədʒɚ/, /ˈɔː-/
  • Hyphenation: ona‧ger

Noun

onager (plural onagers or onagri)

  1. The Asiatic wild ass or hemione (Equus hemionus), an animal of the horse family native to Asia; specifically, the Persian onager, Persian wild ass, or Persian zebra (Equus hemionus onager).
    Synonym: (obsolete) hemionus
  2. (military, historical) A military engine acting like a sling which threw stones from a bag or wooden bucket powered by the torsion from a bundle of ropes or sinews operated by machinery; a torsion catapult.

Hypernyms

  • (military engine): catapult

Hyponyms

  • (wild ass):
    • khulan, koulan, kulan (Equus hemionus kulan)
    • chigetai, dziggetai, Mongolian wild ass (Equus hemionus hemionus)

Coordinate terms

  • (military engine): mangonel, trebuchet

Related terms

  • onagga (dauw or striped quagga)

Translations

References

Further reading

  • onager on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • onager (weapon) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • onager at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Gerona, Gorean, Orange, Ragone, groane, orange

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin onager, from Ancient Greek ὄναγρος (ónagros).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /oːˈnaː.ɣər/
  • Hyphenation: ona‧ger
  • Rhymes: -aːɣər

Noun

onager m (plural onagers)

  1. onager, Asiatic wild ass, Equus hemionus
    Synonyms: halfezel, woudezel
  2. (historical) onager (Roman torsion catapult)

Latin

Alternative forms

  • onagrus

Etymology

From Hellenistic Ancient Greek ὄναγρος (ónagros, wild ass), from ὄνος (ónos, ass) + ἄγριος (ágrios, wild).

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈo.na.ɡer/, [ˈɔnäɡɛɾ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈo.na.d͡ʒer/, [ˈɔːnɑd͡ʒɛr]

Noun

onager m (genitive onagrī); second declension

  1. wild ass; onager
  2. onager (type of military engine)

Declension

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

See also

  • ballista
  • catapulta

Descendants

  • French: onagre
  • Italian: onagro
  • Portuguese: onagro
  • Spanish: onagro
  • English: onager

Further reading

  • onager in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • onager in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • onager in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • onager in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers

Old French

Etymology

From Latin onager.

Noun

onager m (oblique plural onagers, nominative singular onagers, nominative plural onager)

  1. (clarification of this definition is needed)onager

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