balloon vs billow what difference

what is difference between balloon and billow

English

Etymology

1570, “a game played with a large, inflated leather ball” (possibly via Middle French ballon) from Italian pallone (large ball) from palla (ball), from Lombardic *palla. The Northern Italian form, balla (ball shaped bundle), today a doublet, likely derived from Old French balle, from Frankish *balla (ball), and may have influenced the spelling of this word. Both Germanic words are from Proto-Germanic *ballô (ball), *balluz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰoln- (bubble), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰel- (to blow, swell, inflate). Akin to Old High German ballo, bal (ball), (German Ballen (bale); Ball “ball”). Doublet of ballon. More at ball.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bəˈluːn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bəˈlun/
  • Rhymes: -uːn
  • Hyphenation: bal‧loon

Noun

balloon (plural balloons)

  1. An inflatable buoyant object, often (but not necessarily) round and flexible.
  2. Such an object as a child’s toy or party decoration.
  3. Such an object designed to transport people through the air.
  4. (medicine) A sac inserted into part of the body for therapeutic reasons; such as angioplasty.
  5. A speech bubble.
  6. A type of glass cup, sometimes used for brandy.
  7. (architecture) A ball or globe on the top of a pillar, church, etc.
    the balloon of St. Paul’s Cathedral in London
  8. (chemistry) A round vessel, usually with a short neck, to hold or receive whatever is distilled; a glass vessel of a spherical form.
  9. (pyrotechnics) A bomb or shell.
  10. (obsolete) A game played with a large inflated ball.
  11. (engraving) The outline enclosing words represented as coming from the mouth of a pictured figure.
  12. (slang) A woman’s breast.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:breasts
  13. (slang) A small container for illicit drugs made from a condom or the finger of a latex glove, etc.
    • 2016, David Cornwell, Like it Matters
      And all I had to do in return was take a drive up to Ricardo’s place on the way home and then a pretty edgy one back to Rondebosch with a balloon of coke sandwiched between two pairs of underpants.
  14. (finance) Synonym of balloon payment
    • 1986, James M. Johnson, Fundamentals of finance for equipment lessors
      The purpose of the balloon is to reduce the periodic payment required during the life of the financing period.

Synonyms

  • (inflatable object):
  • (child’s toy): toy balloon
  • (in medicine):
  • (speech bubble): speech bubble, fumetto

Hyponyms

  • (transport): hot-air balloon, Montgolfier

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Assamese: বেলুন (belun)
  • Bengali: বেলুন (belun)
  • Japanese: バルーン (barūn)
  • Maori: parūnu
  • Welsh: balŵn
  • Zulu: ibhaloni

Translations

Verb

balloon (third-person singular simple present balloons, present participle ballooning, simple past and past participle ballooned)

  1. (intransitive) To increase or expand rapidly.
    His stomach ballooned from eating such a large meal.
    Prices will balloon if we don’t act quickly.
  2. (intransitive) To go up or voyage in a balloon.
  3. (transitive) To take up in, or as if in, a balloon.
  4. (transitive) To inflate like a balloon.
    • 1944, Emily Carr, The House of All Sorts, “Peach Scanties,” [3]
      A puff of wind from the open door caught and ballooned the scanties; off they sailed, out the window billowing into freedom.
  5. (transitive, sports) To strike (a ball) so that it flies high in the air.
    • 2015, Steve Wilson, A View From The Terraces (part 2, page 138)
      After four minutes, leading goalscorer Haworth slid in but ballooned the ball over from six yards, and Hume then outran the defence to get to the by-line, but he could only hit his cross straight out.

Translations

See also

  • airship
  • ball
  • ballonet
  • blimp
  • dirigible
  • gondola
  • zeppelin


English

Etymology

From Middle English *bilowe, *bilewe, *bilwe, *bilȝe, borrowed from Old Norse bylgja, from Proto-Germanic *bulgijō. Cognates include Danish bølge, Norwegian Bokmål bølge, Norwegian Nynorsk bylgje, Middle High German bulga and Low German bulge.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɪləʊ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbɪloʊ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪləʊ

Noun

billow (plural billows)

  1. A large wave, swell, surge, or undulating mass of something, such as water, smoke, fabric or sound
    • 1782, William Cowper, “Expostulation”, in Poems by William Cowper, of the Inner Temple, Esq..
      [] Whom the winds waft where’er the billows roll, / From the world’s girdle to the frozen pole;
    • 1842, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Wreck of the Hesperus”, in Ballads and Other Poems.
    • 1873, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “The Brook and the Wave” in Birds of Passage:
      And the brooklet has found the billow / Though they flowed so far apart.
    • 1893 August, Rudyard Kipling, “Seal Lullaby”, in “The White Seal”, National Review.

Translations

Verb

billow (third-person singular simple present billows, present participle billowing, simple past and past participle billowed)

  1. To surge or roll in billows.
    • 1942, Emily Carr, The Book of Small, “Chain Gang,”[1]
      The nuns’ veils billowed and flapped behind the snaky line of girls as if the sisters were shooing the serpent from the Garden of Eden.
  2. To swell out or bulge.

Translations

References


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