banal vs commonplace what difference

what is difference between banal and commonplace

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French banal (held in common, relating to feudal service, by extension commonplace), from Old French banel, related to Medieval Latin bannālis (subject to feudal authority), from Latin bannus (jurisdiction), both ultimately from Proto-Germanic *bannaną (order, summon, forbid). See also ban, abandon.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bə-näl’, IPA(key): /bəˈnɑːl/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːl
  • enPR: bān’əl, IPA(key): /ˈbeɪnəl/
  • Rhymes: -eɪnəl
  • enPR: bə-năl’, IPA(key): /bəˈnæl/
  • Rhymes: -æl

Adjective

banal (comparative more banal or banaler, superlative most banal or banalest)

  1. Common in a boring way, to the point of being predictable; containing nothing new or fresh.
    Synonyms: everyday, prosaic; see also Thesaurus:hackneyed, Thesaurus:boring
    Antonyms: new, original
  2. (uncommon, historical) Relating to a type of feudal jurisdiction or service.

Related terms

  • banality
  • banalize
  • banally

Translations

Further reading

  • banal in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • banal in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Alban, Balan, Blaan, Laban, Nabal, alban, laban, labna, nabal, nabla

Breton

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

banal m

  1. bramble
  2. broom (a plant, sp. Genista)

Catalan

Etymology

From French banal.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /bəˈnal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /baˈnal/

Adjective

banal (masculine and feminine plural banals)

  1. banal (common in a boring way)

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “banal” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “banal” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “banal” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “banal” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

From ban +‎ -al, related to Medieval Latin bannālis, from bannus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.nal/
  • Homophones: banale, banals, banales

Adjective

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banals, feminine plural banales)

  1. banal; commonplace

Adjective

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banaux, feminine plural banales)

  1. (law) public
  2. (historical) relating to facilities owned by feudal lords

Derived terms

  • banalité

Descendants

Further reading

  • “banal” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).
  • Banalité (droit seigneurial) on the French Wikipedia.Wikipedia fr

Anagrams

  • Alban

German

Etymology

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baˈnaːl/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

banal (comparative banaler, superlative am banalsten)

  1. banal

Declension

Related terms

Further reading

  • “banal” in Duden online

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay banal, from Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbanal]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧nal

Adjective

banal

  1. banal (common)
    Synonym: biasa
  2. rude
    Synonym: kasar

Further reading

  • “banal” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Luxembourgish

Adjective

banal (masculine banalen, neuter banaalt, comparative méi banal, superlative am banaalsten)

  1. banal

Declension


Malay

Etymology

From Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /banal/
  • Rhymes: -anal, -nal, -al

Adjective

banal (Jawi spelling بانل‎)

  1. banal (common)
    Synonym: basi

Further reading

  • “banal” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

Masbatenyo

Adjective

banál

  1. holy; divine

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧nal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Adjective

banal m or f (plural banais, comparable)

  1. banal (common)
  2. hackneyed (repeated too often)
    Synonyms: batido, trivial

Derived terms


Romanian

Etymology

From French banal.

Adjective

banal m or n (feminine singular banală, masculine plural banali, feminine and neuter plural banale)

  1. commonplace

Declension

Related terms

  • banalitate

Spanish

Etymology

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baˈnal/, [baˈnal]
  • Rhymes: -al

Adjective

banal (plural banales)

  1. banal

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “banal” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Tagalog

Etymology

Compare Bikol Central banal and Kapampangan banal.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧nal
  • IPA(key): /baˈnal/, [bɐˈnal]

Adjective

banál

  1. holy; sacred; blessed
    Synonyms: sagrado, santo
  2. virtuous; righteous
  3. pious; devout

Derived terms



English

Etymology

A calque of Latin locus commūnis, referring to a generally applicable literary passage, itself a calque of Ancient Greek κοινὸς τόπος (koinòs tópos).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmənˌpleɪs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs/
  • Hyphenation: com‧mon‧place

Adjective

commonplace (comparative more commonplace, superlative most commonplace)

  1. Ordinary; not having any remarkable characteristics.
    Synonyms: routine, undistinguished, unexceptional; see also Thesaurus:hackneyed
    Antonyms: distinguished, inimitable, unique

Translations

Noun

commonplace (plural commonplaces)

  1. A platitude or cliché.
  2. Something that is ordinary; something commonly done or occurring.
  3. A memorandum; something to be frequently consulted or referred to.
    • 1710, Jonathan Swift, A Discourse concerning the Mechanical Operation of the Spirit
      Whatever, in my reading, occurs concerning this our fellow creature, I do never fail to set it down by way of common-place.
  4. A commonplace book.

Translations

Verb

commonplace (third-person singular simple present commonplaces, present participle commonplacing, simple past and past participle commonplaced)

  1. To make a commonplace book.
  2. To enter in a commonplace book, or to reduce to general heads.
    • 1711, Henry Felton, Dissertation on Reading the Classics
      I do not apprehend any difficulty in collecting and commonplacing an universal history from the [] historians.
  3. (obsolete) To utter commonplaces; to indulge in platitudes.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Francis Bacon to this entry?)

Related terms

  • commonplace book

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