band vs banding what difference

what is difference between band and banding

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bănd, IPA(key): /bænd/
  • (æ-tensing) IPA(key): [beənd]
  • Homophone: banned
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Etymology 1

From Middle English band (also bond), from Old English beand, bænd, bend (bond, chain, fetter, band, ribbon, ornament, chaplet, crown), from Proto-Germanic *bandą, *bandiz (band, fetter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind). Middle English band reinforced by Old French bande. Cognate with Dutch band, German Band, Danish bånd, Swedish band, Icelandic bandur (band). Related to bond, bind, bend.

Noun

band (plural bands)

  1. A strip of material used for strengthening or coupling.
    1. A strip of material wrapped around things to hold them together.
    2. A narrow strip of cloth or other material on clothing, to bind, strengthen, or ornament it.
      • 1843, Thomas Hood, The Song of the Shirt
        band and gusset and seam
    3. A strip along the spine of a book where the pages are attached.
    4. A belt or strap that is part of a machine.
  2. A long strip of material, color, etc, that is different from the surrounding area.
  3. (architecture) A strip of decoration.
    1. A continuous tablet, stripe, or series of ornaments, as of carved foliage, of colour, or of brickwork.
    2. In Gothic architecture, the moulding, or suite of mouldings, which encircles the pillars and small shafts.
  4. That which serves as the means of union or connection between persons; a tie.
  5. A linen collar or ruff worn in the 16th and 17th centuries.
  6. (in the plural) Two strips of linen hanging from the neck in front as part of a clerical, legal, or academic dress.
    Hyponym: preaching band
  7. (physics) A part of the electromagnetic spectrum.
  8. (physics) A group of energy levels in a solid state material.
  9. (obsolete) A bond.
  10. (obsolete) Pledge; security.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  11. (especially US) A ring, such as a wedding ring (wedding band), or a ring put on a bird’s leg to identify it.
  12. (sciences) Any distinguishing line formed by chromatography, electrophoresis etc
  13. (medicine) Short for band cell.
  14. (slang, hiphop, often in the plural) A wad of money totaling $1K, held together by a band; (by extension) money
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Japanese: バンド (bando)
  • Korean: 밴드 (baendeu)
Translations

Verb

band (third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (transitive) To fasten with a band.
  2. (transitive, ornithology) To fasten an identifying band around the leg of (a bird).
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English band, from Old French bande, from Old Occitan banda (regiment of troops), perhaps from Frankish *bend, from Proto-Germanic *bandiz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie; bond, band). Compare German Bande (band).

Noun

band (plural bands)

  1. A group of musicians who perform together as an ensemble, usually for a professional recording artist.
  2. A type of orchestra originally playing janissary music.
  3. A marching band.
  4. A group of people loosely united for a common purpose (a band of thieves).
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      But in the meantime Robin Hood and his band lived quietly in Sherwood Forest, without showing their faces abroad, for Robin knew that it would not be wise for him to be seen in the neighborhood of Nottingham, those in authority being very wroth with him.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Chapter 23
      “My third command to the Winged Monkeys,” said Glinda, “shall be to carry you to your forest. Then, having used up the powers of the Golden Cap, I shall give it to the King of the Monkeys, that he and his band may thereafter be free for evermore.”
  5. (anthropology) A small group of people living in a simple society, contrasted with tribes, chiefdoms, and states.
  6. (Canada) A group of aboriginals that has official recognition as an organized unit by the federal government of Canada.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Cantonese: band (Chinglish)
  • German: Band (colloquial)
  • Japanese: バンド (bando)
  • Korean: 밴드 (baendeu)
Translations

Verb

band (third-person singular simple present bands, present participle banding, simple past and past participle banded)

  1. (intransitive) To group together for a common purpose; to confederate.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Acts xxiii. 12
      Certain of the Jews banded together.
  2. (transitive, education) To group (students) together by perceived ability; to stream.
Derived terms
  • band together
Translations

Etymology 3

Verb

band

  1. (obsolete) simple past tense and past participle of bind

See also

  • band on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Band in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)
  • band at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • band in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • B-DNA, bDNA, bdna

Chinese

Etymology

Borrowed from English band.

Pronunciation

Noun

band

  1. (Cantonese) band (group of musicians) (Classifier: )
    • 期望快快成為世界最勁嘅Band [Cantonese, trad.]
      期望快快成为世界最劲嘅Band [Cantonese, simp.]

      From: 1987, 許冠傑 (Samuel Hui), 潮流興夾Band
      kei4 mong6 faai3 faai3 sing4 wai4 sai3 gaai3 zeoi3 ging6 ge3 ben1 [Jyutping]
      Hoping that we’ll quickly become the world’s best band
    • C:邊隊band先?
      A:係囖。冇講到係邊隊band
      [Cantonese, trad.]
      C:边队band先?
      A:系囖。冇讲到系边队band
      [Cantonese, simp.]

      From: 1998, 收音機1 (Radio 1), Hong Kong Cantonese Corpus (HKCanCor)
      C: Bin1 deoi6 ben1 sin1?
      A: Hai6 lo1. mou5 gong2 dou3 hai6 bin1 deoi6 ben1.
      [Jyutping]
      C: So which band?
      A: Indeed, they didn’t mention which band.
    • 彈結他嗰個通常係一隊band嘅中心,表演嗰陣要好似leader咁帶住隊band,好自然就會吸引到觀眾嘅目光㗎喇。 [Cantonese, trad.]
      弹结他嗰个通常系一队band嘅中心,表演嗰阵要好似leader咁带住队band,好自然就会吸引到观众嘅目光㗎喇。 [Cantonese, simp.]

      From: 2010, TVB-J2, K-ON!輕音少女 (K-On!), season 1, episode 2
      taan4 git3 taa1 go2 go3 tung1 soeng4 hai6 jat1 deoi6 ben1 ge3 zung1 sam1, biu2 jin2 go2 zan6 jiu3 hou2 ci5 li1 daa4 gam2 daai3 zyu6 deoi6 ben1, hou2 zi6 jin4 zau6 wui5 kap1 jan5 dou3-2 gun1 zung3 ge3 muk6 gwong1 gaa3 laa3. [Jyutping]
      The guitarist is usually the center of a band and has to lead the band during performances, and naturally becomes the audience’s center of attention.

Synonyms

  • 樂隊乐队 (yuèduì)
  • 組合组合 (zǔhé)

References

  • English Loanwords in Hong Kong Cantonese

Danish

Etymology 1

From English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baːnd/, [b̥æːnd̥]

Noun

band n (singular definite bandet, plural indefinite band or bands)

  1. band
Inflection
Derived terms
  • funkband

Etymology 2

From Old Norse bann (ban, curse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ban/, [b̥ænˀ]

Noun

band n (singular definite bandet, not used in plural form)

  1. (rare) excommunication

Etymology 3

From bande (swear, curse), from Old Norse banna (ban, curse).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ban/, [b̥ænˀ]

Noun

band c or n

  1. (rare) swear word

Verb

band

  1. imperative of bande

References

  • “band” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch bant. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: band
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

band m (plural banden, diminutive bandje n)

  1. bond, connection, liaison, tie (attachment, as in a relation)
  2. band (all English senses, above, except for group of musicians) (clarification of this definition is needed)
  3. ribbon or object of similar shape
    1. tire/tyre (e.g. a car tyre)
    2. tape (magnetic tape, video tape)
    3. belt (martial arts belt)
    4. belt (conveyor belt)
  4. (physics) interval relating to frequency or wavelength in electromagnetic phenomena
    1. range of energy levels in a solid state material
    2. interval in the light spectrum
  5. bank (the bank of a pool table)
Derived terms
Related terms
  • verband
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: band
  • Negerhollands: band
  • Indonesian: ban
    • Petjo: ban
  • Papiamentu: bant, banchi

Noun

band n (plural banden, diminutive bandje n)

  1. ribbon

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: band
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

band m (plural bands, diminutive bandje n)

  1. (music) band

Faroese

Etymology

From Old Norse band.

Noun

band n (genitive singular bands, plural bond)

  1. (a piece of) rope, string
  2. (figuratively, in the plural) ties, connection, relations

Declension


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Verb

band

  1. past of binden

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [pant]
  • Rhymes: -ant

Noun

band n (genitive singular bands, nominative plural bönd)

  1. (a piece of) string
  2. yarn
  3. (figuratively, in the plural) ties, connection, relations
  4. binding (of a book)
  5. (music) tie
  6. (music, slang) a musical band

Declension

Synonyms

  • (band): hljómsveit f

Derived terms

  • vera á bandi
  • vinna á sitt band
  • samband
  • myndband

Related terms

  • binda
  • bundinn

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bande, bend
  • bond, boond, bonde, bound

Etymology

From Old English bend, from Proto-Germanic *bandiz; vocalism is influenced by Old Norse band and Old French bande.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɔːnd/, /baːnd/, /bɔnd/, /band/

Noun

band (plural bandes)

  1. That which obstructs one’s free will and free action; a restraint.
    1. A chain or other object used to restrain a captive.
    2. Captivity; the condition of being jailed.
    3. A compact, directive or binding pact (either reciprocal or from one unto another)
  2. A strip of a material used to tie or bind; a band:
    1. A rope or piece of twine used to tie or bind.
    2. A headband (a band that surrounds the head)
    3. A metal band that surrounds an object in order to strengthen it.
    4. (anatomy, rare) A joint or sinew.
    5. (heraldry, rare) A diagonal stripe or band.
  3. (rare) A strip of a material not used to tie or bind.
  4. Something used to join or connect; a link.
    1. (figuratively) A metaphorical connection or linkage.
  5. A collection or group of bound items.

Descendants

  • English: band, bend, bond
  • Scots: band, bend

References

  • “bō̆nd, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-25.

Norwegian Bokmål

Alternative forms

  • bånd (see this word for common usage)

Etymology

From English band (in this sense)

Noun

band n (definite singular bandet, indefinite plural band, definite plural banda or bandene)

  1. (music) a band; group of (rock) musicians

Derived terms

  • rockeband
  • samband

References

  • “band” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse band, akin to English bond.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑnd/

Noun

band n (definite singular bandet, indefinite plural band, definite plural banda)

  1. a tape
  2. a ribbon
  3. a band
  4. a bond
  5. a leash (for a dog)

Derived terms

  • samband

Etymology 2

From English band (music)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bænd/, /bɑnd/

Noun

band n (definite singular bandet, indefinite plural band, definite plural banda)

  1. (music) a band

References

  • “band” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *bandą.

Noun

band n (genitive bands, plural bǫnd)

  1. the act of binding or settling
    Antonym: lausn
  2. band, cord
  3. (plural only) bonds, fetters
  4. (plural only) bond, confederacy
  5. (plural only, poetic) the gods

Declension

Derived terms

  • bandamaðr m (confederate)
  • bandingi m (prisoner)

Related terms

  • binda (to bind)

Descendants

References

  • band in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Swedish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse band.

Pronunciation

Noun

band n

  1. a band, a ribbon, a tape; a strip of material
  2. a band, an ensemble, an orchestra; group of musicians
  3. a band, a gang; band of robbers
  4. (physics) a band; a part of radio spectrum
  5. (physics) a band; a group of energy levels
  6. a belt used for transporting material or objects between two places; conveyor belt
    Synonym: transportband
  7. caterpillar track; a belt or band fitted instead of wheels to off-road vehicles
    Synonym: larvfötter
  8. an audio tape or a video tape
  9. a cassette of audio or video tape
  10. a tie, a connection, a relation; from a person to another person or to a place

Declension

Derived terms

  • halsband
  • kasettband

Related terms

  • banda
  • bandning

Etymology 2

From English band

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈband/

Noun

band n

  1. (music) a band

Declension

Verb

band

  1. past tense of binda.

Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from English band.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /band/

Noun

band m (plural bandiau)

  1. band (group of musicians)
  2. band (strip of material)
  3. (physics) band

Derived terms

  • band arian (silver band)
  • band eang (broadband)
  • band lastig (elastic band)
  • band llydan (broadband)
  • band pres (brass band)

Mutation

Further reading

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “band”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbændɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ændɪŋ

Noun

banding (countable and uncountable, plural bandings)

  1. A pattern of band-like markings.
  2. A technique used in the study of wild birds, by attaching a small, individually numbered, metal or plastic tag to their legs or wings.
  3. A division into bands or brackets.
    property tax banding
  4. The formation of a band or brigade.
    • 1848, The Odd-fellows’ Offering (page 60)
      Was he aiding the man-redeeming movements of the day, the beautiful associations, the useful bandings together for human improvement, love and truth? No.

Synonyms

  • (technique in study of birds): ringing

Translations

Verb

banding

  1. present participle of band

Anagrams

  • Ngbandi

Indonesian

Etymology

From Malay banding (comparison).

  • For sense of appeal (law), probably a semantic loan from Chinese (“to check; to compare”), a variant of (“to check; to compare”). For comparison, see 上告 (“to appeal”, literally “to raise an appeal”) and naik banding (to appeal, literally to raise an appeal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bandiŋ/
  • Hyphenation: ban‧ding

Noun

banding (first-person possessive bandingku, second-person possessive bandingmu, third-person possessive bandingnya)

  1. comparison
    Synonyms: imbangan, persamaan, tara
  2. (law) appeal: an application to a superior court or judge for a decision or order by an inferior court or judge to be reviewed and overturned.
    Synonym: apèl

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “banding” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Malay

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

banding (plural bandingbanding, informal 1st possessive bandingku, impolite 2nd possessive bandingmu, 3rd possessive bandingnya)

  1. comparison
  2. (Indonesia) synonym of rayuan (appeal), see Indonesian banding for more information.

Descendants

  • Indonesian: banding.

Further reading

  • “banding” in Pusat Rujukan Persuratan Melayu | Malay Literary Reference Centre, Kuala Lumpur: Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka, 2017.

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