bandit vs brigand what difference

what is difference between bandit and brigand

English

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian bandito (outlawed), a derivative of Italian bandire (to ban). The Italian verb is inherited from Vulgar Latin *bannire (to proclaim), but its form was influenced by Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (bandwjan, to signal).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbændɪt/

Noun

bandit (plural bandits)

  1. One who robs others in a lawless area, especially as part of a group.
  2. An outlaw.
  3. One who cheats others.
  4. (military) An enemy aircraft.
  5. (sports, slang) A runner who covertly joins a race without having registered as a participant.

Synonyms

  • (one who robs others): See Thesaurus:thief
  • (outlaw): criminal, fugitive, outlaw
  • (one who cheats others): cheater

Derived terms

  • gas meter bandit
  • one-armed bandit
  • shag bandit

Related terms

  • banditti

Translations

Verb

bandit (third-person singular simple present bandits, present participle banditing, simple past and past participle bandited)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To rob, or steal from, in the manner of a bandit.
    • 1921, Munsey’s Magazine (volume 74, page 38)
      First, she read the bandit news in the paper, and was rather disappointed to learn that her man had evidently taken a night off from banditing. An imitator of the bandit had made an unsuccessful attempt to hold up a drug-store, and had backed out and run when the nervy proprietor reached for a gun; but that was all.
    • 1937, The Atlantic Monthly (volume 160, page 7)
      As the sanctuary was bandited at least once, it may be that the silver wine cups I have are from the treasure.

References

Anagrams

  • IT Band, IT band

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑ̃.di/
  • Rhymes: -i
  • Homophone: bandits

Noun

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. bandit

Derived terms

  • banditisme
  • bandit de grand chemin
  • bandit manchot

Descendants

  • German: Bandit
    • Polish: bandyta
  • Norman: bandit

Further reading

  • “bandit” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Indonesian

Etymology

From Dutch bandiet, from Middle French bandit, from Italian bandito.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbandɪt̚]
  • Hyphenation: ban‧dit

Noun

bandit (first-person possessive banditku, second-person possessive banditmu, third-person possessive banditnya)

  1. bandit
    Synonyms: penjahat, pencuri

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “bandit” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norman

Etymology

Borrowed from French bandit.

Noun

bandit m (plural bandits)

  1. (Jersey) bandit

Romanian

Etymology

From French bandit

Noun

bandit m (plural bandiți)

  1. bandit

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Italian bandito.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bǎndiːt/
  • Hyphenation: ban‧dit

Noun

bàndīt m (Cyrillic spelling ба̀ндӣт)

  1. bandit

Declension

References

  • “bandit” in Hrvatski jezični portal


English

Etymology

From Middle English brigaunt, bregaund circa 1400, from Old French brigand (foot soldier) attested from 1421, from Italian briga (trouble, bother), perhaps ultimately of Proto-Germanic or Celtic origin.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈbɹɪɡ.ənd/

Noun

brigand (plural brigands)

  1. An outlaw or bandit.

Related terms

  • brigandage

Translations

Anagrams

  • Brading, barding

French

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bʁi.ɡɑ̃/

Noun

brigand m (plural brigands)

  1. (derogatory) thief

Adjective

brigand (feminine singular brigande, masculine plural brigands, feminine plural brigandes)

  1. (Louisiana, Cajun French) mischievous

Further reading

  • “brigand” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Old French

Noun

brigand m (oblique plural briganz or brigantz, nominative singular briganz or brigantz, nominative plural brigand)

  1. foot soldier

Descendants

  • English: brigand

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (brigand)

Romanian

Etymology

From French brigand.

Noun

brigand m (plural briganzi)

  1. brigand

Declension


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