bank vs trust what difference

what is difference between bank and trust

English

Alternative forms

  • banck, bancke, banke (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæŋk/
  • Rhymes: -æŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle English banke, from Middle French banque, from Old Italian banca (counter, moneychanger’s bench or table), from Lombardic bank (bench, counter), from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench, counter), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeg- (to turn, curve, bend, bow). Doublet of bench and banc.

Noun

bank (countable and uncountable, plural banks)

  1. (countable) An institution where one can place and borrow money and take care of financial affairs.
  2. (countable) A branch office of such an institution.
  3. (countable) An underwriter or controller of a card game.
    Synonyms: banker, banque
  4. (countable) A fund from deposits or contributions, to be used in transacting business; a joint stock or capital.
    • a. 1626, Francis Bacon, Of Usury
      Let it be no bank or common stock, but every man be master of his own money.
  5. (gambling, countable) The sum of money etc. which the dealer or banker has as a fund from which to draw stakes and pay losses.
  6. (slang, uncountable) Money; profit.
  7. (countable) In certain games, such as dominos, a fund of pieces from which the players are allowed to draw.
  8. (countable, chiefly in combination) A safe and guaranteed place of storage for and retrieval of important items or goods.
  9. (countable) A device used to store coins or currency.
Derived terms
Related terms
Descendants
  • Bislama: bang
Borrowings

Some may be via other European languages.

Translations

Verb

bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (intransitive) To deal with a bank or financial institution, or for an institution to provide financial services to a client.
  2. (transitive) To put into a bank.
  3. (transitive, slang) To conceal in the rectum for use in prison.
Derived terms
  • bankable
  • banked
  • banker
  • banking
  • bank on
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bank, from Old English hōbanca (couch) and Old English banc (bank, hillock, embankment), from Proto-Germanic *bankô. Akin to Old Norse bakki (elevation, hill), Norwegian bakke (slope, hill).

Noun

bank (plural banks)

  1. (hydrology) An edge of river, lake, or other watercourse.
    • 2014, Ian Jack, “Is this the end of Britishness”, The Guardian, 16 September 2014:
      Just upstream of Dryburgh Abbey, a reproduction of a classical Greek temple stands at the top of a wooded hillock on the river’s north bank.
  2. (nautical, hydrology) An elevation, or rising ground, under the sea; a shallow area of shifting sand, gravel, mud, and so forth (for example, a sandbank or mudbank).
    the banks of Newfoundland
  3. (geography) A slope of earth, sand, etc.; an embankment.
  4. (aviation) The incline of an aircraft, especially during a turn.
  5. (rail transport) An incline, a hill.
  6. A mass noun for a quantity of clouds.
    The bank of clouds on the horizon announced the arrival of the predicted storm front.
  7. (mining) The face of the coal at which miners are working.
  8. (mining) A deposit of ore or coal, worked by excavations above water level.
  9. (mining) The ground at the top of a shaft.
    Ores are brought to bank.
Derived terms
Related terms
  • bench
Translations

Verb

bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (intransitive, aviation) To roll or incline laterally in order to turn.
  2. (transitive) To cause (an aircraft) to bank.
  3. (transitive) To form into a bank or heap, to bank up.
  4. (transitive) To cover the embers of a fire with ashes in order to retain heat.
  5. (transitive) To raise a mound or dike about; to enclose, defend, or fortify with a bank; to embank.
    • Aristoma∣chus would haue them to be stript from their leaues in winter, & in any hand to be banked well about, that the water stand not there in any hollow furrow or hole lower than the other ground
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To pass by the banks of.
  7. (rail transport, Britain) To provide additional power for a train ascending a bank (incline) by attaching another locomotive.
Derived terms
  • bank-and-turn indicator, turn-and-bank indicator
Translations

Etymology 3

From Middle English bank (bank), banke, from Old French banc (bench), from Frankish *bank. Akin to Old English benc (bench).

Noun

bank (plural banks)

  1. A row or panel of items stored or grouped together.
  2. A row of keys on a musical keyboard or the equivalent on a typewriter keyboard.
  3. (computing) A contiguous block of memory that is of fixed, hardware-dependent size, but often larger than a page and partitioning the memory such that two distinct banks do not overlap.
  4. (pinball) A set of multiple adjacent drop targets.
Synonyms
  • (row or panel of items): (row) line, rank, tier; (panel) block, grid, panel
Derived terms
  • double-bank
  • filter bank, filterbank
  • optical bank
  • phone bank
Translations

Verb

bank (third-person singular simple present banks, present participle banking, simple past and past participle banked)

  1. (transitive, order and arrangement) To arrange or order in a row.

Etymology 4

Probably from French banc. Of Germanic origin, and akin to English bench.

Noun

bank (plural banks)

  1. A bench, as for rowers in a galley; also, a tier of oars.
    • 1658, Edmund Waller, he Passion of Dido for Æneas
      Placed on their banks, the lusty Trojans sweep / Neptune’s smooth face, and cleave the yielding deep.
  2. A bench or seat for judges in court.
  3. The regular term of a court of law, or the full court sitting to hear arguments upon questions of law, as distinguished from a sitting at nisi prius, or a court held for jury trials. See banc.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  4. (archaic, printing) A kind of table used by printers.
  5. (music) A bench, or row of keys belonging to a keyboard, as in an organ.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Knight to this entry?)
  6. (uncountable) slang for money
Derived terms
  • Bank Royal
  • Common Bank
Related terms
  • banc
  • banquette
  • frank bank

References

  • “bank”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.

Anagrams

  • Knab, knab, nabk

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baŋk/

Etymology 1

From Dutch bank, from Middle Dutch banc, from Old Dutch *bank, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz.

Noun

bank (plural banke, diminutive bankie)

  1. bench, couch
Derived terms
  • onder stoele of banke wegsteek
  • toonbank

Etymology 2

From Dutch bank, from Middle Dutch banc, from Italian banco, from Old High German bank, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz.

Noun

bank (plural banke, diminutive bankie)

  1. bank (financial institution)
  2. (games, gambling) bank, a player who controls a deposit in some card games or board games and in gambling

Verb

bank (present bank, present participle bankende, past participle gebank)

  1. (transitive) to deposit, to bank
  2. (intransitive) to bank

Azerbaijani

Etymology

Ultimately from French banque.

Noun

bank (definite accusative bankı, plural banklar)

  1. bank (financial institution)

Declension

Further reading

  • “bank” in Obastan.com.

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

Borrowed from French banque

Noun

bank

  1. bank (financial institution)

Declension


Danish

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French banque, from Italian banco (bench).

Noun

bank c (singular definite banken, plural indefinite banker)

  1. bank (financial institution, branch office, controller of a game, a safe and guaranteed place of storage)
Declension
Derived terms
  • bankanvisning
  • bankier
  • bankør
Descendants
  • Faroese: banki
  • Greenlandic: banki
  • Icelandic: banki

Etymology 2

From German Bank (bench).

Noun

bank c

  1. only used in certain expressions
Derived terms
  • over en bank

Noun

bank n (singular definite banket, plural indefinite bank)

  1. knock (an abrupt rapping sound)
  2. (pl) a beating
Declension
Synonyms
  • (beating): tæsk, tæv

Verb

bank

  1. imperative of banke

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑŋk/
  • Hyphenation: bank
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋk

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch banc, from Old Dutch *bank, from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz.

Noun

bank f (plural banken, diminutive bankje n)

  1. bench
  2. (Netherlands) couch, sofa
    Synonym: sofa
  3. place where seashells are found
  4. shallow part of the sea near the coast
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: bank
  • Javindo: bang
  • Negerhollands: bank, banki
  • Papiamentu: banki
  • Sranan Tongo: bangi
    • Aukan: bangi
    • Caribbean Hindustani: bángi
    • Saramaccan: bángi

Etymology 2

From Middle Dutch banc, from Italian banco, from Old High German bank, from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz, related to Etymology 1 above.

Noun

bank f (plural banken, diminutive bankje n)

  1. A bank (financial institution)
  2. (games, gambling) The bank, a player who controls a deposit in some card games or board games and in gambling
  3. A banknote, especially 100 Dutch guilders (also in the diminutives bankie or bankje.)
  4. A bank, collection and/or repository.
Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: bank
  • Aukan: banku
  • Caribbean Hindustani: bánk
  • Malay: bank
    • Indonesian: bank
    • Central Dusun: bank
    • Central Melanau: bank
    • Makasar: bank
    • Javanese: bang
    • Sundanese: bank
  • Papiamentu: banki (dated)
  • Saramaccan: bánku
  • Sranan Tongo: bangi
  • West Frisian: bank
  • Dutch: bankje, bankie (diminutive)
    • Sranan Tongo: barki
      • Dutch: barkie

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Bank, from Italian banca.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbɒŋk]
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋk

Noun

bank (plural bankok)

  1. bank (financial institution)
    Synonym: pénzintézet
  2. (gambling) bank (the sum of money etc. which the dealer or banker has as a fund from which to draw stakes and pay losses)

Declension

Derived terms

References

Further reading

  • bank in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • bank in Ittzés, Nóra (ed.). A magyar nyelv nagyszótára (’A Comprehensive Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 2006–2031 (work in progress; published A–ez as of 2021)

Icelandic

Etymology

Back-formation from banka (to knock, to beat).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pauŋ̊k/
  • Rhymes: -auŋ̊k

Noun

bank n (genitive singular banks, no plural)

  1. knock, blow

Declension


Indonesian

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from Dutch bank (bank). Doublet of bangku.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baŋ/
  • Hyphenation: bank
  • Homophone: bang

Noun

bank

  1. bank:
    1. an institution where one can place and borrow money and take care of financial affairs.
    2. a safe and guaranteed place of storage for and retrieval of important items or goods.

Derived terms

  • perbankan

Compounds

Further reading

  • “bank” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Maltese

Etymology

From French banque

Pronunciation

Noun

bank m (plural banek)

  1. bank

Noun

bank m (plural bankijiet)

  1. bench

Middle English

Etymology

From Old English hōbanca (couch) and Old English banc (bank, hillock, embankment), from Proto-Germanic *bankô. Akin to Old Norse bakki (elevation, hill), Norwegian bakke (slope, hill).

Noun

bank (plural banks)

  1. the bank of a river or lake

Descendants

  • English: bank

References

  • “bank(e, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Norwegian Bokmål

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑŋk/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French banque, from Italian banco (bench), banca

Noun

bank m (definite singular banken, indefinite plural banker, definite plural bankene)

  1. a bank (financial institution)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From the verb banke

Noun

bank m (definite singular banken, indefinite plural banker, definite plural bankene)

  1. a beat, knock, throb
Derived terms
  • hjertebank

Etymology 3

Verb

bank

  1. imperative of banke

References

  • “bank” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “bank_4” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • “bank_5” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

Borrowed from French banque, from Italian banco (bench), banca.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑŋk/

Noun

bank m (definite singular banken, indefinite plural bankar, definite plural bankane)

  1. a bank (financial institution)

Derived terms

References

  • “bank” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old High German

Alternative forms

  • panch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *banki.

Noun

bank f

  1. bench

Descendants

  • Middle High German: banc, bank
    • German: Bank
      • Danish: bank
      • Norwegian Bokmål: bank
    • Luxembourgish: Bänk
    • Pennsylvania German: Bank
  • Old French: banc
    • French: banc (see there for further descendants)
    • Norman: banc
    • Middle English: bank, banke
      • English: bank
    • Galician: banco
    • Spanish: banco (see there for further descendants)
  • Old Italian: banco, banca
    • Italian: banco, banca (see there for further descendants)
      • Italian: banchetto (see there for further descendants)
    • Byzantine Greek: πάγκος (pánkos)
      • Greek: πάγκος (págkos)
    • Middle French: banque (see there for further descendants)
    • German: Bank (see there for further descendants)
  • Medieval Latin: bancus, banca

Polish

Etymology

From Italian banco via German Bank.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baŋk/

Noun

bank m inan

  1. bank

Declension

Derived terms

  • bankowy
  • bankowość
  • bankier

Descendants

  • Belarusian: bank (bank)
  • Ukrainian: банк (bank)

References

Further reading

  • bank in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Slovene

Noun

bánk

  1. inflection of bánka:
    1. genitive dual
    2. genitive plural

Swedish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaŋːk/

Etymology

From Dutch bank, German Bank or Low German bank, all from Italian banco, from Old High German banc, from Proto-West Germanic *banki, from Proto-Germanic *bankiz.

Noun

bank c

  1. a bank (financial institution, branch of such an institution)
  2. a bank (place of storage)
  3. a bank (of a river of lake)
  4. a sandbank

Declension

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Elfdalian: baunka
  • Finnish: pankki

References

  • bank in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Turkish

Etymology

Borrowed from French banc.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑŋk/
  • Hyphenation: bank

Noun

bank (definite accusative bankı, plural banklar)

  1. bench (long seat)

Declension


Volapük

Noun

bank (nominative plural banks)

  1. bank (financial institution)

Declension



English

Etymology

From Middle English trust (trust, protection), from Old Norse traust (confidence, help, protection), from Proto-Germanic *traustą, from Proto-Indo-European *drowsdom, from Proto-Indo-European *deru- (be firm, hard, solid).

Akin to Danish trøst, tröst (trust), Saterland Frisian Traast (comfort, solace), West Frisian treast (comfort, solace), Dutch troost (comfort, consolation), German Trost (comfort, consolation), Gothic trausti (trausti, alliance, pact). More at true, tree.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: trŭst, IPA(key): /trʌst/, [tɹʌst], [tɹɐst], [t͡ʃɹ-]
  • (Northern England) IPA(key): /trʊst/
  • Rhymes: -ʌst

Noun

trust (countable and uncountable, plural trusts)

  1. Confidence in or reliance on some person or quality.
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes
      O ever-failing trust / In mortal strength!
  2. Dependence upon something in the future; hope.
  3. Confidence in the future payment for goods or services supplied; credit.
  4. That which is committed or entrusted; something received in confidence; a charge.
  5. That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.
  6. (rare) Trustworthiness, reliability.
  7. The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.
    • 17th century, John Denham, Of Justice
      Reward them well, if they observe their trust.
  8. (law) The confidence vested in a person who has legal ownership of a property to manage for the benefit of another.
  9. (law) An arrangement whereby property or money is given to be held by a third party (a trustee), on the basis that it will be managed for the benefit of, or eventually transferred to, a stated beneficiary; for example, money to be given to a child when he or she reaches adulthood.
  10. A group of businessmen or traders organised for mutual benefit to produce and distribute specific commodities or services, and managed by a central body of trustees.
  11. (computing) Affirmation of the access rights of a user of a computer system.

Synonyms

  • (confidence in a person or quality): belief, confidence, faith
  • (hope): expectation, hope

Antonyms

  • distrust
  • mistrust
  • untrust
  • wantrust

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

trust (third-person singular simple present trusts, present participle trusting, simple past and past participle trusted)

  1. (transitive) To place confidence in, to rely on, to confide in.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Act I scene iv:
      I will never trust his word after.
    • October 5, 1751, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler No. 162
      He that trusts without reserve will at last be deceived.
  2. (intransitive, with in) To have faith in; to rely on for continuing support or aid.
    ― official US motto
  3. (transitive) To give credence to; to believe; to credit.
  4. (transitive) To hope confidently; to believe (usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object)
    • I trust to come unto you, and speak face to face.
    • We trust we have a good conscience.
  5. (transitive) to show confidence in a person by entrusting them with something.
  6. (transitive) To commit, as to one’s care; to entrust.
    • .
      Merchants were not willing to trust precious cargoes to any custody but that of a man-of-war.
  7. (transitive) To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment.
  8. (intransitive, followed by to) To rely on (something), as though having trust (on it).
  9. (archaic, transitive) To risk; to venture confidently.
  10. (intransitive) To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.
    • I will trust and not be afraid.
  11. (archaic, intransitive) To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.

Antonyms

  • distrust
  • mistrust

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

trust (comparative more trust, superlative most trust)

  1. (obsolete) Secure, safe.
  2. (obsolete) Faithful, dependable.
  3. (law) of or relating to a trust.

Anagrams

  • strut, sturt

French

Etymology

From English trust.

Pronunciation

  • (France, Quebec) IPA(key): /tʁœst/

Noun

trust m (plural trusts)

  1. a trust (a group of businessmen or traders)

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from English trust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtrast/, /ˈtrɛst/, /ˈtrøst/

Noun

trust m (invariable)

  1. trust (group of people)

Derived terms

  • trust di cervelli (brains trust)

References


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • truste, troste, trist, trest

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Norse traust.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /trust/

Noun

trust (uncountable)

  1. confidence, reliance

Descendants

  • English: trust
  • Yola: thrist

References

  • “trust, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

Spanish

Etymology

Borrowed from English trust.

Noun

trust m (plural trusts)

  1. (finance) trust

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