banner vs standard what difference

what is difference between banner and standard

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbænə/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbænɚ/
  • (Southern England, Australia) IPA(key): (etymology 1) /ˈbænə/, (etymology 2) /ˈbæːnə/
  • Rhymes: -ænə(r)
  • Homophone: banter (some North American dialects)

Etymology 1

From Middle English baner, from Old French baniere (Modern bannière), of Germanic origin. More at band.

Noun

banner (plural banners)

  1. A flag or standard used by a military commander, monarch or nation.
  2. (by extension) The military unit under such a flag or standard.
  3. (by extension) A military or administrative subdivision.
  4. Any large sign, especially when made of soft material or fabric.
    The mayor hung a banner across Main Street to commemorate the town’s 100th anniversary.
  5. A large piece of cloth with a slogan, motto, or emblem carried in a demonstration or other procession or suspended in some conspicuous place.
  6. (by extension, figuratively) A cause or purpose; a campaign or movement.
    They usually make their case under the banner of environmentalism.
  7. (journalism) The title of a newspaper as printed on its front page; the nameplate; masthead.
  8. (Internet, television) A type of advertisement on a web page or on television, usually taking the form of a graphic or animation above or alongside the content.
    Coordinate terms: interstitial, popup
  9. (heraldry) The principal standard of a knight.
  10. A type of administrative division in Inner Mongolia, China (хошуу/旗) and Tuva (кожуун), made during the Qing dynasty. At this time, Outer Mongolia and part of Xinjiang were also divided this way.
    Hanggin Rear Banner, Bayannur, Inner Mongolia, China
Derived terms
Translations

Adjective

banner (not comparable)

  1. Exceptional; very good.
    • 2016, David M. Kennedy, Lizabeth Cohen, Mel Piehl, The Brief American Pageant: A History of the Republic (page 73)
      The Zenger decision was a banner achievement for freedom of the press. It pointed the way to the kind of open public discussion required by the diverse society that colonial New York already was and that all America was to become.
Translations

Verb

banner (third-person singular simple present banners, present participle bannering, simple past and past participle bannered)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with a banner.
  2. (transitive, journalism) To display as a banner headline.
    • 2008, Howard Rosenberg, Charles S. Feldman, No Time To Think
      At 8:11, bannering the headline “Cheney in Charge?” the Drudge Report runs a story speculating that the president may be incapacitated.

Etymology 2

ban +‎ -er

Noun

banner (plural banners)

  1. One who bans something.
    • 1963, The Australian Library Journal (volumes 1-14, page 69)
      How ridiculous the banners of some of the books at present on the list will appear in the future.

References

  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [2]

Anagrams

  • Brenna

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English banner.

Pronunciation

  • (Netherlands) IPA(key): /ˈbɛ.nər/
  • Hyphenation: ban‧ner
  • (Netherlands) Rhymes: -ɛnər

Noun

banner m (plural banners, diminutive bannertje n)

  1. banner (web advertisement)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From French bannière

Noun

banner n (definite singular banneret, indefinite plural banner or bannere, definite plural bannera or bannerne)

  1. a banner (most senses)

References

  • “banner” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From French bannière

Noun

banner n (definite singular banneret, indefinite plural banner, definite plural bannera)

  1. a banner (most senses)

References

  • “banner” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Noun

banner m (plural banners)

  1. (Internet) banner (advertisement in a web page)

Scots

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbanər]

Noun

banner (plural banners)

  1. banner, flag

Synonyms

  • ensenyie

Spanish

Noun

banner m (plural banners)

  1. banner


English

Etymology

From Middle English, from the Old French estandart (gathering place, battle flag), from Old Frankish *standhard (literally stand firm, stand hard), equivalent to stand +‎ -ard. Alternative etymology derives the second element from Old Frankish *ord (point, spot, place) (compare Old English ord (point, source, vanguard), German Standort (location, place, site, position, base, literally standing-point)). More at stand, hard, ord.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈstændəd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈstændəɹd/, [ˈsteəndɚd]
  • Hyphenation: stan‧dard

Adjective

standard (comparative more standard, superlative most standard)

  1. Falling within an accepted range of size, amount, power, quality, etc.
  2. (of a tree or shrub) Growing alone as a free-standing plant; not trained on a post etc.
    • 1863, Anthony Trollope, Rachel Ray:
      There are women who cannot grow alone as standard trees;—for whom the support and warmth of some wall, some paling, some post, is absolutely necessary […].
  3. Having recognized excellence or authority.
    standard works in history; standard authors
  4. Of a usable or serviceable grade or quality.
  5. (not comparable, of a motor vehicle) Having a manual transmission.
  6. As normally supplied (not optional).
  7. (linguistics) Conforming to the standard variety.

Antonyms

  • nonstandard, non-standard

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations

Noun

standard (plural standards)

  1. A principle or example or measure used for comparison.
    1. A level of quality or attainment.
    2. Something used as a measure for comparative evaluations; a model.
      • 1712, Jonathan Swift, A Proposal For Correcting, Improving, and Ascertaining the English Tongue
        the court, which used to be the standard of propriety and correctness of speech
      • 1790, Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France
        A disposition to preserve, and an ability to improve, taken together, would be my standard of a statesman.
    3. A musical work of established popularity.
    4. A rule or set of rules or requirements which are widely agreed upon or imposed by government.
    5. The proportion of weights of fine metal and alloy established for coinage.
      • 1727, John Arbuthnot, Tables of Ancient Coins, Weights and Measures. Explain’d and exemplify’d in several dissertations
        By the present standard of the coinage, sixty-two shillings is coined out of one pound weight of silver.
    6. (sociolinguistics) standard idiom, a prestigious or standardized language variety; standard language
    7. A bottle of wine containing 0.750 liters of fluid.
    8. (India) Grade level in primary education.
  2. A vertical pole with something at its apex.
    1. An object supported in an upright position, such as a lamp standard.
    2. The flag or ensign carried by a military unit.
      • His armies, in the following day, / On those fair plains their standards proud display.
    3. One of the upright members that supports the horizontal axis of a transit or theodolite.
    4. Any upright support, such as one of the poles of a scaffold.
    5. A sturdy, woody plant whose upright stem is used to graft a less hardy ornamental flowering plant on, rather then actually planting it.
    6. A tree of natural size supported by its own stem, and not dwarfed by grafting on the stock of a smaller species nor trained upon a wall or trellis.
    7. The sheth of a plough.
  3. A manual transmission vehicle.
  4. (botany) The upper petal or banner of a papilionaceous corolla.
  5. (shipbuilding) An inverted knee timber placed upon the deck instead of beneath it, with its vertical branch turned upward from that which lies horizontally.
  6. A large drinking cup.

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Descendants

Translations

Interjection

standard

  1. (slang) An expression of agreement

References

Anagrams

  • Randstad, sand dart

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈstandart]

Noun

standard m

  1. standard

Related terms

See also

  • norma
  • měřítko

Further reading

  • standard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • standard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From English standard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstanˌdarˀt/, [ˈsd̥anˌd̥ɑːˀd̥]
  • Homophone: standart

Noun

standard c (singular definite standarden, plural indefinite standarder)

  1. standard

Inflection


French

Etymology

Borrowed from English standard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑ̃.daʁ/

Noun

standard m (plural standards)

  1. standard
  2. switchboard

Adjective

standard (feminine singular standarde, masculine plural standards, feminine plural standardes)

  1. standard

Usage notes

  • Often treated as invariable (with the single form standard used for masculine and feminine, singular and plural), but dictionary accounts vary.

Synonyms

  • normal

References

Further reading

  • “standard” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Alternative forms

  • standar (misspelling)

Etymology

Borrowed from English.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstan.dard/

Adjective

standard (invariable)

  1. standard

Noun

standard m (invariable)

  1. standard

Related terms

  • standardizzare
  • standardizzazione

References


Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old French estandart, via English standard

Adjective

standard (singular and plural standard, comparative mer standard, superlative mest standard)

  1. standard

Noun

standard m (definite singular standarden, indefinite plural standarder, definite plural standardene)

  1. a standard

Derived terms

  • levestandard

References

  • “standard” in The Bokmål Dictionary.
  • “standard_1” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).
  • “standard_2” in Det Norske Akademis ordbok (NAOB).

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old French estandart, via English standard

Adjective

standard (singular and plural standard, comparative meir standard, superlative mest standard)

  1. standard

Noun

standard m (definite singular standarden, indefinite plural standardar, definite plural standardane)

  1. a standard

Derived terms

  • levestandard

References

  • “standard” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Etymology

From English standard, from Middle English, from Old French estandart (gathering place, battle flag), from Old Frankish *standhard (literally stand firm, stand hard).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstan.dart/

Noun

standard m inan

  1. standard

Declension

Derived terms

  • (noun) standaryzacja
  • (adjective) standardowy

Further reading

  • standard in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • standard in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

From French standard.

Noun

standard n (plural standarde)

  1. standard

Declension


Serbo-Croatian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stǎndard/
  • Hyphenation: stan‧dard

Noun

stàndard m (Cyrillic spelling ста̀ндард)

  1. standard

Declension


Swedish

Noun

standard c

  1. a standard, a norm

Declension

Related terms

  • standardisera

See also

  • standar

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