banquet vs junket what difference

what is difference between banquet and junket

English

Alternative forms

  • bankette (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English banket, from Middle French banquet, from Italian banchetto (light repast between meals, snack eaten on a small bench, literally a small bench), from banco (bench), from Lombardic *bank, *panch (bench), from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench). Akin to Old High German bank, banch (bench), Old English benċ (bench). More at bank, bench.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæŋkwɪt/

Noun

banquet (plural banquets)

  1. A large celebratory meal; a feast.
    • c. 1605, William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, Scene 4,[1]
      True, worthy Banquo; he is full so valiant,
      And in his commendations I am fed;
      It is a banquet to me.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Esther 5:4,[2]
      And Esther answered, If it seem good unto the king, let the king and Haman come this day unto the banquet that I have prepared for him.
    • 1715, John Gay, The What D’ye Call It, Act II, Scene 9,[3]
      So comes a Reck’ning when the Banquet’s o’er,
      The dreadful Reck’ning, and Men smile no more.
    • 1800, William Wordworth, “Nutting,” in Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems, London: Longman & Rees, Volume II, p. 133,[4]
      [] the hazels rose
      Tall and erect, with milk-white clusters hung,
      A virgin scene! — A little while I stood,
      Breathing with such suppression of the heart
      As joy delights in; and, with wise restraint
      Voluptuous, fearless of a rival, eyed
      The banquet, []
    • 1933, Kahlil Gibran, The Garden of the Prophet,[5]
      And the sun, even as you and I and all there is, sits in equal honour at the banquet of the Prince whose door is always open and whose board is always spread.
    • 1972, “China Coverage: Sweet and Sour,” Time, 6 March, 1972,[6]
      The thrill of discovery quickly wore off. TV crews and reporters were soon scurrying frantically to satisfy the medium’s insatiable appetite for novelty, sometimes achieving massive inanity instead. During coverage of the first great banquet, correspondents—who had not been given menus—variously described those little orange balls decorating the table’s center as pomegranates, oranges or JellO. (They were actually North China tangerines.)
  2. (archaic) A dessert; a course of sweetmeats.
    • 1639, Philip Massinger, The Unnatural Combat, Act III, Scene 1,[7]
      We’ll dine in the great room, but let the music
      And banquet be prepared here.
    • 1874, Saturday Review: Politics, Literature, Science and Art
      At Inverkeithing the teetotalers objected to this profligate expenditure, so the Provost and magistrates manfully paid for their “cookies” out of their own pockets. At Dunse, instead of a cake and wine banquet, there was “a fruit conversazione,” whatever that may be.

Synonyms

  • (large celebratory meal): feast, reception

Derived terms

  • banqueteer
  • banqueteering

Descendants

  • Scottish Gaelic: bangaid (Canadian)

Translations

Verb

banquet (third-person singular simple present banquets, present participle banqueting or banquetting, simple past and past participle banqueted or banquetted)

  1. (intransitive) To participate in a banquet; to feast.
    • c. 1594, William Shakespeare, Love’s Labour’s Lost, Act I, Scene 1,[8]
      I am resolved; ’tis but a three years’ fast:
      The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
      Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
      Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Song of Songs 2:4,[9]
      He brought me to the banqueting house, and his banner over me was love.
    • 1634, John Milton, Comus, lines 701-702,[10]
      Were it a draught for Juno when she banquets,
      I would not taste thy treasonous offer.
    • 1820, Walter Scott, Ivanhoe, Chapter 32,[11]
      “Ay, ay,” said Wamba, who had resumed his attendance on his master, “rare feeding there will be—pity that the noble Athelstane cannot banquet at his own funeral.—But he,” continued the Jester, lifting up his eyes gravely, “is supping in Paradise, and doubtless does honour to the cheer.”
  2. (obsolete) To have dessert after a feast.
    • 1580, George Cavendish, quoted by John Stow (ed.), The Annales of England, Faithfully collected out of the most autenticall Authors, Records, and other Monuments of Antiquitie, 1600 edition, “Henry the eight.,” p. 907,[12]
      Then was the banquetting chamber in the tilt yard at Greenewich, to the which place these strangers were conducted by the noblest personages in the court, where they did both sup and banquet.
  3. (transitive) To treat with a banquet or sumptuous entertainment of food; to feast.
    • c. 1593, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act I, Scene 1,[13]
      Not possible; for who shall bear your part
      And be in Padua here Vincentio’s son;
      Keep house and ply his book, welcome his friends,
      Visit his countrymen, and banquet them?
    • 1800, Frederick Schiller, The Piccolomini, or the First Part of Wallenstein, translated by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, London: Longman & Rees, Act I, Scene 1, p. 2,[14]
      Just in time to banquet
      The illustrious company assembled there.
    • 1828, Washington Irving, A History of the Life and Voyages of Christopher Columbus, Book X, Chapter II,[15]
      They treated them with profound reverence, as beings descended from heaven, and conducted them to a spacious house, the residence of the cacique, where they were banqueted in their simple and hospitable way, with bread and various fruits of excellent flavour, and different kinds of beverages which have been already mentioned.

Derived terms

  • banqueter
  • banqueting

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /bəŋˈkət/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /bəŋˈkɛt/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /baŋˈket/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from French banquet.

Noun

banquet m (plural banquets)

  1. banquet (celebratory meal)

Etymology 2

From banc +‎ -et.

Noun

banquet m (plural banquets)

  1. small bench

Further reading

  • “banquet” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “banquet” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “banquet” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “banquet” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

From Middle French banquet, from Italian banchetto (light repast between meals, snack eaten on a small bench, literally a small bench), from banco (bench), from Lombardic bank (bench) / Lombardic panch (bench), from Proto-Germanic *bankiz (bench). Akin to Old High German bank, banch (bench), Old English benc (bench). Compare Old French banquet, which only meant “small bench”, from the same Proto-Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑ̃.kɛ/

Noun

banquet m (plural banquets)

  1. banquet

Descendants

  • Catalan: banquet
  • Norwegian: bankett
  • Portuguese: banquete
  • Romanian: banchet
  • Spanish: banquete
  • Swedish: bankett
    • Finnish: banketti

Further reading

  • “banquet” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Etymology

From Middle English jonket (basket made of rushes; food, probably made of sour milk or cream; banquet, feast.), from Medieval Latin iuncta, possibly from Latin iuncus (rush, reed) and therefore a possible doublet of jonquil.

Meaning shifted to “feast of banquet” by 1520s, probably via the notion of a picnic basket. This in turn led to the sense of “pleasure-trip” (1814), and then to specifically to “trip made ostensibly for business but which entails merrymaking or entertainment” by 1886 in American English.

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈdʒʌŋkɪt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌŋkɪt

Noun

junket (plural junkets)

  1. (obsolete) A basket.
  2. A type of cream cheese, originally made in a rush basket; later, a food made of sweetened curds or rennet.
    • 1818, John Keats, “Where be ye going, you Devon maid?”:
      I love your meads, and I love your flowers, / And I love your junkets mainly […].
  3. (obsolete) A delicacy.
    • 1593, William Shakespeare, The Taming of the Shrew, Act III, Scene 2,[1]
      [] though bride and bridegroom wants
      For to supply the places at the table,
      You know there wants no junkets at the feast.
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.4:
      Goe streight, and take with thee to witnesse it / Sixe of thy fellowes of the best array, / And beare with you both wine and juncates fit, / And bid him eate […].
  4. A feast or banquet.
    • 1790, Ambrose Philips, The free-thinker, Vol III. No 124., page 95
      Conversation is the natural Junket of the Mind ; and most Men have an Appetite to it, once in the day at least […].
  5. A pleasure-trip; a journey made for feasting or enjoyment, now especially a trip made ostensibly for business but which entails merrymaking or entertainment.
  6. A press junket.
    • 2018, An Phung and Chloe Melas,”Women accuse Morgan Freeman of inappropriate behavior, harassment”, CNN entertainment, May 24, 2018
      An entertainment reporter who is a member of the Hollywood Foreign Press Association said Freeman made comments about her skirt and her legs during two different junkets.
  7. (gambling) A gaming room for which the capacity and limits change daily, often rented out to private vendors who run tour groups through them and give a portion of the proceeds to the main casino.

Translations

References

Verb

junket (third-person singular simple present junkets, present participle junketing or junketting, simple past and past participle junketed or junketted)

  1. (intransitive, dated) To attend a junket; to feast.
    • 1677, Hannah Woolley, The Compleat Servant-Maid, London: T. Passinger, p. 2,[2]
      Be careful that you wast not, or spoil your Ladies, or Mistresses goods, neither sit you up junketing a nights, after your Master and Mistress be abed.
    • 1688, Robert South, Sermon preached on 8 April, 1688, in Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions. The Second Volume, London: Thomas Bennet, p. 414,[3]
      Iob’s Children junketted and feasted together often, but the Reckoning cost them dear at last.
    • 1748, Samuel Richardson, Clarissa, London, for the author, Volume 1, Letter 32, p. 218,[4]
      ’Tis better than lying abed half the day, and junketing and card-playing all the night, and makeing yourselves wholly useless to every good purpose in your own families, as is now the fashion among ye []
    • 1879, Robert Louis Stevenson, Edinburgh: Picturesque Notes, London: Seeley, Jackson & Halliday, Chapter 10, p. 38,[5]
      After they had built their water-house and laid their pipes, it occurred to them that the place was suitable for junketing. Once entertained, with jovial magistrates and public funds, the idea led speedily to accomplishment; and Edinburgh could soon boast of a municipal Pleasure House.
  2. (intransitive) To go on a junket; to travel.
    • 1910, Lucy Maud Montgomery, “Miss Sally’s Letter,”[6]
      Together they made trips to town or junketed over the country in search of furniture and dishes of which Miss Sally had heard.
    • 1921, Ida Tarbell, “The Socialization of the Home” in The Business of Being a Woman, New York: Macmillan,[7]
      It is only by much junketing about that one comes to the full realization of what men and women in the main are doing in this country. One learns as he passes from town to town, through cities and across plains, that the general reason for industry everywhere is to get the means to build and support a home.
    • 1943, Patrick Quentin, “The Last of Mrs. Maybrick” in Marc Gerald (ed.), Murder Plus: True Crime Stories from the Masters of Detective Fiction, New York: Pharos, 1992, p. 214,[8]
      It was her belief that the summer folk went junketing off with the first fall of autumn leaves, leaving their cats to starve.
    • 1985, Herman Wouk, Inside, Outside, New York: Avon, 1986, Chapter 81, p. 549,[9]
      On the boat I met an old art history professor, with whom I junketed around for a while, visiting museums in London and Paris []
  3. (transitive) To regale or entertain with a feast.

Synonyms

  • (attend a junket): banquet
  • (go on a junket): gallivant, jaunt

Translations


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