baptize vs christen what difference

what is difference between baptize and christen

English

Alternative forms

  • baptise

Etymology

From Middle English baptisen, baptizen, from Old French baptiser, batisier, from Ecclesiastical Latin, Late Latin baptizāre, from Ancient Greek βαπτίζω (baptízō, to immerse, plunge, baptize).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæptaɪz/
  • Hyphenation: bap‧tize

Verb

baptize (third-person singular simple present baptizes, present participle baptizing, simple past and past participle baptized)

  1. (Christianity) To perform the sacrament of baptism by sprinkling or pouring water over someone or immersing them in water.
  2. To dedicate or christen.
  3. (archaic, slang) Of rum, brandy, or any other spirits, to dilute with water.
  4. (slang) To ensure proper burning of a joint by moistening the exterior with saliva.

Synonyms

  • christen

Derived terms

  • baptization
  • baptizer

Related terms

  • baptism

Translations


Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

baptize

  1. Alternative form of bapteme

Etymology 2

Verb

baptize

  1. Alternative form of baptisen

Portuguese

Verb

baptize

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of baptizar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of baptizar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of baptizar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of baptizar


English

Alternative forms

  • kersen (dialectal)
  • christian

Etymology

From Middle English cristenen, cristnien, from Old English cristnian (to christen, baptise), from cristen (Christen, Christian) +‎ -nian. Cognate with Dutch kerstenen (to christen), Middle Low German kristenen, kerstenen, karstenen (to christen), Danish kristne (to christen) Swedish kristna (to christen), Icelandic kristna (to christen).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkɹɪsən/
  • Rhymes: -ɪsən

Verb

christen (third-person singular simple present christens, present participle christening, simple past and past participle christened)

  1. (transitive) To perform the religious act of baptism upon; to baptize.
  2. (transitive, by extension) To name.
    • 1684-1690, Thomas Burnet, Sacred Theory of the Earth
  3. (obsolete) To Christianize.
    1657, Jeremy Taylor, Discourse of the Nature, Offices and Measures of Friendship
    • I must tell you that christianity hath new christened it
  4. (colloquial) To use for the first time.
  5. (informal) To douse or wet with blood, urine, tears, or other liquid.
    • 2002: Q Is for Quarry by Sue Grafton
      I christened the facilities, shrugged into my windbreaker, and met Dolan at his door.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Nichters, Strichen, Tinchers, centrish, chinrest, citherns, cithrens, snitcher

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • kersten (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle Dutch cristen, variant of kersten, from Old Dutch [Term?], from Latin Christiānus, from Ancient Greek Χρῑστιᾱνός (Khrīstiānós). The current Dutch spelling has been influenced by the Latin and subsequently also the Greek words.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkrɪs.tən/
  • (some orthodox Protestants) IPA(key): /ˈxrɪs.tən/
  • Hyphenation: chris‧ten
  • Rhymes: -ɪstən

Noun

christen m (plural christenen, diminutive christentje n, feminine christin)

  1. Christian

Derived terms

  • christendemocraat
  • christendemocratie
  • christin
  • gristen
  • jodenchristen
  • ontchristenen

Descendants

  • Negerhollands: christ

Related terms

  • christendom

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