barb vs dig what difference

what is difference between barb and dig

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑː(ɹ)b/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)b

Etymology 1

From Middle English barbe, from Middle French barbe, from Old French barbe (beard, beard-like element). Doublet of beard.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. The point that stands backward in an arrow, fishhook, etc., to prevent it from being easily extracted. Hence: Anything which stands out with a sharp point obliquely or crosswise to something else.
    • 1545, Roger Ascham, Toxophilus
      Having two barbs or points.
  2. (figuratively) A hurtful or disparaging remark.
  3. A beard, or that which resembles it, or grows in the place of it.
    • The barbel is so called [] by reason of his barbs, or wattles at his mouth.
  4. (ornithology) One of the many side branches of a feather, which collectively constitute the vane.
  5. (ichthyology) Any of various species of freshwater carp-like fish that have barbels and belong to the cyprinid family.
  6. (US) The sciaenid fish Menticirrhus americanus, found along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
    Synonyms: Carolina whiting, king whiting, southern kingcroaker, southern kingfish
  7. (botany) A hair or bristle ending in a double hook.
  8. (obsolete) A muffler, worn by nuns and mourners.
  9. Paps, or little projections, of the mucous membrane, which mark the opening of the submaxillary glands under the tongue in horses and cattle. The name is mostly applied when the barbs are inflamed and swollen.
    Synonyms: barbel, barble
  10. (obsolete) A bit for a horse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  11. A plastic fastener, shaped roughly like a capital I (with serifs), used to attach socks etc. to their packaging.
Translations

Verb

barb (third-person singular simple present barbs, present participle barbing, simple past and past participle barbed)

  1. To furnish with barbs, or with that which will hold or hurt like barbs, as an arrow, fishhook, spear, etc.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 6, lines 544-6, [2]
      [] for this day will pour down, / If I conjecture aught, no drizzling shower, / But rattling storm of arrows barbed with fire.
    • 1944, Emily Carr, The House of All Sorts, “Meg the Worker,” [3]
      Her coat was a tangled mass, barbed with last year’s burs, matted disgustingly with cow dung.
  2. (Nigeria) To cut (hair).
  3. (obsolete) To shave or dress the beard of.
  4. (obsolete) To clip; to mow.
    • 1603, John Marston, The Malcontent
      The stooping scythe-man , that doth barb the field
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of Barbary.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. The Barbary horse, a superior breed introduced from Barbary into Spain by the Moors.
  2. A blackish or dun variety of pigeon, originally brought from Barbary.

Etymology 3

Clipping of barbiturate.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. (informal, pharmacology) A barbiturate.
    Coordinate term: benzo

Etymology 4

Corruption of bard.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. Armor for a horse.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 29:
      The defensive armor with the horses of the ancient knights … These are frequently, though improperly, stiled barbs.
Translations

Verb

barb (third-person singular simple present barbs, present participle barbing, simple past and past participle barbed)

  1. To cover a horse in armor.

Further reading

  • barb on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • barb (fish) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Barb in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • BBAR, Rabb, abbr, abbr.

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbaɾp/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈbarp/

Etymology 1

From Latin barbus.

Noun

barb m (plural barbs)

  1. barbel (freshwater fish of the genus Barbus)

Etymology 2

From Latin varus, influenced by barba (beard).

Noun

barb m (plural barbs)

  1. blackhead (skin blemish)

Further reading

  • “barb” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish borb (foolish, rude).

Adjective

barb (plural barbey, comparative barbey)

  1. sharp, drastic
  2. cruel, rough

Derived terms

  • neuvarb

Noun

barb m (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. sharp point, javelin

Mutation


English

Etymology 1

From Middle English diggen (to dig), alteration of Old English dīcian (to dig a ditch, to mound up earth) (compare Old English dīcere (digger)) from dīc, dīċ (dike, ditch) from Proto-Germanic *dīkaz, *dīkiją (pool, puddle), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰīgʷ-, *dʰeygʷ- (to stab, dig). Additionally, Middle English diggen may derive from an unrecorded suffixed variant, *dīcgian. Akin to Danish dige (to dig, raise a dike), Swedish dika (to dig ditches). Related to Middle French diguer (to dig), from Old French dikier, itself a borrowing of the same Germanic root (from Middle Dutch dijc). More at ditch, dike.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Verb

dig (third-person singular simple present digs, present participle digging, simple past and past participle dug)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To move hard-packed earth out of the way, especially downward to make a hole with a shovel. Or to drill, or the like, through rocks, roads, or the like. More generally, to make any similar hole by moving material out of the way.
  2. (transitive) To get by digging; to take from the ground; often with up.
  3. (mining) To take ore from its bed, in distinction from making excavations in search of ore.
  4. (US, slang, dated) To work like a digger; to study ploddingly and laboriously.
    • 1894, Paul Leicester Ford, The Honorable Peter Stirling
      Peter dug at his books all the harder.
  5. (figuratively) To investigate, to research, often followed by out or up.
  6. To thrust; to poke.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (sometimes spelt Raphe Robynson) (translator), Utopia (originally written by Sir Thomas More)
      You should have seen children [] dig and push their mothers under the sides, saying thus to them: Look, mother, how great a lubber doth yet wear pearls.
  7. (volleyball) To defend against an attack hit by the opposing team by successfully passing the ball
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

dig (plural digs)

  1. An archeological or paleontological investigation, or the site where such an investigation is taking place.
    Synonym: excavation
  2. (US, colloquial, dated) A plodding and laborious student.
  3. A thrust; a poke.
    Synonym: jab
  4. (Britain, dialect, dated) A tool for digging.
  5. (volleyball) A defensive pass of the ball that has been attacked by the opposing team.
  6. (cricket) An innings.
  7. A cutting, sarcastic remark.
    Synonym: jibe
  8. (music, slang) A rare or interesting vinyl record bought second-hand.
Translations
See also
  • cratedigger
  • digs

Etymology 2

From African American Vernacular English; due to lack of writing of slave speech, etymology is difficult to trace, but it has been suggested that it is from Wolof dëgg, dëgga (to understand, to appreciate). It has also been suggested that it is from Irish dtuig. Others do not propose a distinct etymology, instead considering this a semantic shift of the existing English term (compare dig in/dig into).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪɡ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡ

Verb

dig (third-person singular simple present digs, present participle digging, simple past and past participle dug)

  1. (slang) To understand or show interest in.
  2. (slang) To appreciate, or like.
    • 1975, Saul Bellow, Humboldt’s Gift [Avon ed., 1976, p. 432]:
      Louie said, “I dig this Theo. I’m gonna learn Swahili and rap with him.”
Translations

Etymology 3

Shortening.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɪd͡ʒ/

Noun

dig (uncountable)

  1. (medicine, colloquial) Digoxin.

References

Anagrams

  • GDI, GDI+, GID, IgD, gid

Afrikaans

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dəχ/

Etymology 1

From Dutch dicht, from Middle Dutch dicht, from Old Dutch *thīht, from Proto-Germanic *þinhtaz.

Adjective

dig (attributive digte, comparative digter, superlative digste)

  1. closed, shut
  2. dense

Etymology 2

From Dutch dichten, from Middle Dutch dichten, from Latin dictō.

Verb

dig (present dig, present participle digtende, past participle gedig)

  1. (intransitive) to compose a poem
Derived terms
  • digter
  • gedig

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɑj/, [ˈd̥ɑ̈(j)]
  • Rhymes: -aj

Pronoun

dig (nominative du, possessive din)

  1. (personal) you (2nd person singular object pronoun)

Usage notes

Also used as a reflexive pronoun with a 2nd person subject


Old Irish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʲiɣʲ/

Noun

dig

  1. inflection of deug:
    1. accusative/dative singular
    2. nominative/accusative/vocative dual

Mutation


Romanian

Etymology

From French digue.

Noun

dig n (plural diguri)

  1. dike

Declension


Swedish

Alternative forms

  • dej (strongly colloquial)

Etymology

From Old Norse þik, from Proto-Germanic *þek, from Proto-Indo-European *te-ge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dɛj/
  • Rhymes: -ɛj

Pronoun

dig

  1. you (objective case, singular)
    Jag såg dig aldrig där

    I never saw you there
  2. reflexive case of du: compare yourself
    Skulle du vilja lära dig jonglera?

    Would you like to learn how to juggle?
    Skar du dig på kniven?

    Did you cut yourself on the knife?

Usage notes

Note that some verbs have special senses when used reflexively. For example, do not confuse du lär dig att… (“you learn to…”) [reflexive] with jag lär dig att… (“I teach you to…”) or du lär dig själv att… (“you teach yourself to…”). Here, lär means teach(es) if it is not reflexive, but learn(s) if it is reflexive. Thus, the separate pronoun “dig själv” is needed when object and subject agree, even though the verb should not be used in the reflexive case.

Also note that in the imperative, when there’s usually no explicit subject given, the “själv” is dropped.

Declension

See also

  • dig själv

Yola

Alternative forms

  • digger

Etymology

From Middle English dyggar.

Noun

dig

  1. a duck

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith

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