barb vs shot what difference

what is difference between barb and shot

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bɑː(ɹ)b/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)b

Etymology 1

From Middle English barbe, from Middle French barbe, from Old French barbe (beard, beard-like element). Doublet of beard.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. The point that stands backward in an arrow, fishhook, etc., to prevent it from being easily extracted. Hence: Anything which stands out with a sharp point obliquely or crosswise to something else.
    • 1545, Roger Ascham, Toxophilus
      Having two barbs or points.
  2. (figuratively) A hurtful or disparaging remark.
  3. A beard, or that which resembles it, or grows in the place of it.
    • The barbel is so called [] by reason of his barbs, or wattles at his mouth.
  4. (ornithology) One of the many side branches of a feather, which collectively constitute the vane.
  5. (ichthyology) Any of various species of freshwater carp-like fish that have barbels and belong to the cyprinid family.
  6. (US) The sciaenid fish Menticirrhus americanus, found along the Atlantic and Gulf Coasts of the United States.
    Synonyms: Carolina whiting, king whiting, southern kingcroaker, southern kingfish
  7. (botany) A hair or bristle ending in a double hook.
  8. (obsolete) A muffler, worn by nuns and mourners.
  9. Paps, or little projections, of the mucous membrane, which mark the opening of the submaxillary glands under the tongue in horses and cattle. The name is mostly applied when the barbs are inflamed and swollen.
    Synonyms: barbel, barble
  10. (obsolete) A bit for a horse.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  11. A plastic fastener, shaped roughly like a capital I (with serifs), used to attach socks etc. to their packaging.
Translations

Verb

barb (third-person singular simple present barbs, present participle barbing, simple past and past participle barbed)

  1. To furnish with barbs, or with that which will hold or hurt like barbs, as an arrow, fishhook, spear, etc.
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 6, lines 544-6, [2]
      [] for this day will pour down, / If I conjecture aught, no drizzling shower, / But rattling storm of arrows barbed with fire.
    • 1944, Emily Carr, The House of All Sorts, “Meg the Worker,” [3]
      Her coat was a tangled mass, barbed with last year’s burs, matted disgustingly with cow dung.
  2. (Nigeria) To cut (hair).
  3. (obsolete) To shave or dress the beard of.
  4. (obsolete) To clip; to mow.
    • 1603, John Marston, The Malcontent
      The stooping scythe-man , that doth barb the field
Translations

Etymology 2

Clipping of Barbary.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. The Barbary horse, a superior breed introduced from Barbary into Spain by the Moors.
  2. A blackish or dun variety of pigeon, originally brought from Barbary.

Etymology 3

Clipping of barbiturate.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. (informal, pharmacology) A barbiturate.
    Coordinate term: benzo

Etymology 4

Corruption of bard.

Noun

barb (plural barbs)

  1. Armor for a horse.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 29:
      The defensive armor with the horses of the ancient knights … These are frequently, though improperly, stiled barbs.
Translations

Verb

barb (third-person singular simple present barbs, present participle barbing, simple past and past participle barbed)

  1. To cover a horse in armor.

Further reading

  • barb on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • barb (fish) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Barb in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • BBAR, Rabb, abbr, abbr.

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈbaɾp/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈbarp/

Etymology 1

From Latin barbus.

Noun

barb m (plural barbs)

  1. barbel (freshwater fish of the genus Barbus)

Etymology 2

From Latin varus, influenced by barba (beard).

Noun

barb m (plural barbs)

  1. blackhead (skin blemish)

Further reading

  • “barb” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Manx

Etymology

From Old Irish borb (foolish, rude).

Adjective

barb (plural barbey, comparative barbey)

  1. sharp, drastic
  2. cruel, rough

Derived terms

  • neuvarb

Noun

barb m (genitive singular [please provide], plural [please provide])

  1. sharp point, javelin

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ʃɒt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ʃɑt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt
  • Homophones: shott, chott

Etymology 1

From Old English sceot, from Proto-Germanic *skutą; compare scot.

Adjective

shot (comparative more shot, superlative most shot)

  1. (colloquial) Worn out or broken.
    • 1998, The Tragically Hip, “Thompson Girl”, Phantom Power:
      Thompson girl, I’m stranded at the Unique Motel / Thompson girl, winterfighter’s shot on the car as well
  2. (of material, especially silk) Woven from warp and weft strands of different colours, resulting in an iridescent appearance.
  3. Tired, weary.
  4. Discharged, cleared, or rid of something.
  5. Scarred silly or crazy of something or someone usually due to a traumatic experience with said fear.
Translations

Noun

shot (countable and uncountable, plural shots)

  1. The result of launching a projectile or bullet.
    The shot was wide off the mark.
  2. (sports) The act of launching a ball or similar object toward a goal.
    They took the lead on a last-minute shot.
  3. (athletics) The heavy iron ball used for the shot put.
    The shot flew twenty metres, and nearly landed on the judge’s foot.
  4. (uncountable) Small metal balls used as ammunition.
  5. (uncountable, military) Metal balls (or similar) used as ammunition; not necessarily small.
  6. Someone who shoots (a gun, longbow, etc.); a person reckoned as to their aim.
    He’d make a bad soldier, since he’s a lousy shot.
    • 1902, Robert Marshall Grade, The Haunted Major
      As a shot, I will only refer you to my own game-book; and if, after examining the records contained therein, you can show me an equally proficient man in that special line, well — I’ll take off my hat to him.
  7. An opportunity or attempt.
    I’d like just one more shot at winning this game.
    • 2009, David P. Murphy, Phil Torcivia, Rebecca Shockley, Such a Nice Guy
      You won’t see me buying a round of Jägerbombs for girls half my age because I know when I have no shot.
  8. A remark or comment, especially one which is critical or insulting.
    • 2003, Carla Marinucci, “On inauguration eve, ‘Aaaarnold’ stands tall,” San Francisco Chronicle, 16 Nov. (retrieved 18 Apr. 2009):
      Schwarzenegger also is taking nasty shots from his own party, as GOP conservatives bash some of his appointments as Kennedyesque and traitorous to party values.
  9. (slang, sports, US) A punch or other physical blow.
  10. A measure of alcohol, usually spirits, as taken either from a shot-glass or directly from the bottle, equivalent to about 44 milliliters; 1.5 ounces. (“pony shot”= 30 milliliters; 1 fluid ounce)
    I’d like a shot of whisky in my coffee.
  11. A single serving of espresso.
  12. (archaic) A reckoning, a share of a tavern bill, etc.
    • The Fisher’s Garland for 1835
      Yet still while I have got / Enough to pay the shot / Of Boniface, both gruff and greedy O!
  13. (photography, film) A single snapshot or an unbroken sequence of photographic film exposures, or the digital equivalent; an unedited sequence of frames.
    We got a good shot of the hummingbirds mating.
  14. (medicine) A vaccination or injection.
    I went to the doctor to get a shot for malaria.
  15. (US, Canada, baseball, informal) A home run that scores one, two, or three runs (a four run home run is usually referred to as a grand slam).
    His solo shot in the seventh inning ended up winning the game.
  16. (US federal prison system) Written documentation of a behavior infraction.
  17. (fisheries) A cast of one or more nets.
  18. (fisheries) A place or spot for setting nets.
  19. (fisheries) A single draft or catch of fish made.
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Expressions
  • call the shots
  • give something one’s best shot
  • shot in the arm
Translations

Verb

shot

  1. simple past tense and past participle of shoot

Verb

shot (third-person singular simple present shots, present participle shotting, simple past and past participle shotted)

  1. (transitive) To load (a gun) with shot.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)

Etymology 2

See scot (a share).

Noun

shot (plural shots)

  1. A charge to be paid, a scot or shout.
    Drink up. It’s his shot.

Hyponyms

Translations

Etymology 3

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Interjection

shot

  1. (colloquial, South Africa, New Zealand) Thank you.

Anagrams

  • HOTs, Soth, TOSH, Thos., Tosh, host, hots, oths, tosh

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English shot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃɔt/
  • Hyphenation: shot
  • Rhymes: -ɔt

Noun

shot n or m (plural shots, diminutive shotje n)

  1. (film, photography) shot (sequence of frames)
  2. shot (measure/serving of alcohol)

Derived terms

  • shotglas

French

Pronunciation

Noun

shot m (plural shots)

  1. shot (small quantity of drink, especially alcohol)

Derived terms

  • verre à shot

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃot/, [ˈʃot̪]

Noun

shot m (plural shots)

  1. shot (small portion of drink)
    Synonym: chupito

Swedish

Noun

shot c

  1. shot; measure of alcohol

Usage notes

In Sweden, the term “shot” usually refers to a measure of 4 or 6 cl of alcohol.

Declension

Related terms

  • shotta

Anagrams

  • hots

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