bargain vs steal what difference

what is difference between bargain and steal

English

Etymology

From Middle English bargaynen (to bargain, make a pledge for sale), from Old French bargaigner (to bargain), from Frankish *borganjan (to borrow, lend), from Proto-Germanic *burgijaną (to borrow, lend), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰergʰ- (to protect, secure). Akin to Old High German boragēn, borgēn (to look after, care for) (German borgen), Old English borgian (to borrow, lend, pledge). More at borrow.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bägən, IPA(key): /ˈbɑːɡən/, /-ɡɪn/
  • (General American) enPR: bärgən, IPA(key): /ˈbɑːɹɡən/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)ɡən, -ɑː(ɹ)ɡɪn
  • Hyphenation: bar‧gain

Noun

bargain (plural bargains)

  1. An agreement between parties concerning the sale of property; or a contract by which one party binds himself to transfer the right to some property for a consideration, and the other party binds himself to receive the property and pay the consideration.
    • 1883, J. J. S Wharton, Wharton’s Law Lexicon:
      A contract is a bargain that is legally binding.
  2. An agreement or stipulation; mutual pledge.
    Synonyms: contract, engagement, stipulation
    • c. 1596-97, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act III scene ii[1]:
      [] And when your honors mean to solemnize
      The bargain of your faith, I do beseech you,
      Even at that time I may be married too.
  3. An item purchased for significantly less than the usual, or recommended, price
    Synonym: steal
    Synonym: rip-off
  4. A gainful transaction; an advantageous purchase.
    • Thus the red damask curtains which now shut out the fog-laden, drizzling atmosphere of the Marylebone Road, had cost a mere song, and yet they might have been warranted to last another thirty years. A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; [].
  5. The thing stipulated or purchased.
    Synonym: purchase
    • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act V scene ii[2]:
      If he say so, may his pernicious soul Rot half a grain a day! He lies to th’ heart. She was too fond of her most filthy bargain.

Derived terms

Translations

Descendants
  • Sranan Tongo: barki

Verb

bargain (third-person singular simple present bargains, present participle bargaining, simple past and past participle bargained)

  1. (intransitive) To make a bargain; to make a deal or contract for the exchange of property or services; to negotiate
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part I[3]:
      So worthless peasants bargain for their wives.
      United we bargain, divided we beg
    They had to bargain for a few minutes to get a decent price for the rug.
  2. (transitive) To transfer for a consideration; to barter; to trade

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • haggle

Anagrams

  • Bagrian, braaing

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bargayn, bargayne, bargan, bargen, bargeyn, bargynne

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman bargaigne, from bargaigner.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /barˈɡɛi̯n(ə)/, /ˈbarɡən(ə)/

Noun

bargain (plural bargaines)

  1. A corporate agreement; a trade deal.
  2. A pact; a concord; an agreement with legal force.
  3. A project, venture or endeavour.
  4. (rare) An item or product; a commodity.
  5. (rare) A situation as an outcome of prior behaviour from others.
  6. (rare) A promise or commitment; an obligation due to prior agreement.
  7. (rare) An argument or dispute.

Descendants

  • English: bargain
  • Scots: bargain

References

  • “bargain(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-05-06.

Scottish Gaelic

Noun

bargain m

  1. genitive singular of bargan
  2. nominative plural of bargan


English

Etymology

From Middle English stelen, from Old English stelan, from Proto-Germanic *stelaną (compare West Frisian stelle, Low German stehlen, Dutch stelen, German stehlen, Danish stjæle,
Swedish stjäla,
Norwegian stjele); see below for more.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: stēl, IPA(key): /stiːl/
  • Rhymes: -iːl
  • Homophones: steel, stele

Verb

steal (third-person singular simple present steals, present participle stealing, simple past stole, past participle stolen or (nonstandard, colloquial) stole)

  1. (transitive) To take illegally, or without the owner’s permission, something owned by someone else.
    • “I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I’d be a big man some day, and—I’m glad I didn’t steal.”
  2. (transitive, of ideas, words, music, a look, credit, etc.) To appropriate without giving credit or acknowledgement.
  3. (transitive) To get or effect surreptitiously or artfully.
    • Variety of objects has a tendency to steal away the mind too often from its steady pursuit of any subject.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, Of Great Place
      Always, when thou changest thine opinion or course, profess it plainly, [] and do not think to steal it.
  4. (transitive, colloquial) To acquire at a low price.
  5. (transitive) To draw attention unexpectedly in (an entertainment), especially by being the outstanding performer. Usually used in the phrase steal the show.
  6. (intransitive) To move silently or secretly.
    • 1922, Virginia Woolf, Jacob’s Room Ch.1:
      “Did he take his bottle well?” Mrs. Flanders whispered, and Rebecca nodded and went to the cot and turned down the quilt, and Mrs. Flanders bent over and looked anxiously at the baby, asleep, but frowning. The window shook, and Rebecca stole like a cat and wedged it.
  7. (transitive) To convey (something) clandestinely.
  8. To withdraw or convey (oneself) clandestinely.
    • They could insinuate and steal themselves under the same by their humble carriage and submission.
  9. (transitive, baseball) To advance safely to (another base) during the delivery of a pitch, without the aid of a hit, walk, passed ball, wild pitch, or defensive indifference.
  10. (sports, transitive) To dispossess
  11. (informal, transitive, hyperbolic) To borrow for a short moment.

Synonyms

  • (to illegally take possession of): See Thesaurus:steal
  • (to secretly move): sneak

Antonyms

  • (acquire licitly) receive, purchase, buy, earn
  • (provide freely) donate, bestow, grant

Troponyms

  • shoplift

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • burglarize
  • burgle
  • confiscate
  • pickpocket
  • pilfer
  • steal away

Noun

steal (plural steals)

  1. The act of stealing.
  2. A piece of merchandise available at a very attractive price.
    At this price, this car is a steal.
  3. (basketball, ice hockey) A situation in which a defensive player actively takes possession of the ball or puck from the opponent’s team.
  4. (baseball) A stolen base.
  5. (curling) Scoring in an end without the hammer.
  6. (computing) A policy in database systems that a database follows which allows a transaction to be written on nonvolatile storage before its commit occurs.

Synonyms

  • (merchandise available at a very attractive price): (great / real / very good) bargain

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Astle, ETLAs, Slate, Teals, Tesla, astel, laste, lates, least, leats, salet, setal, slate, stale, stela, taels, tales, teals, telas, tesla

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