baroque vs churrigueresque what difference

what is difference between baroque and churrigueresque

English

Etymology

Via French baroque (which originally meant a pearl of irregular shape), from Portuguese barroco (irregular pearl); related to Spanish barrueco and Italian barocco, of uncertain ultimate origin, but possibly from Latin verrūca (wart). It has been suggested that the term derives from Baroco, a technical term from scholastic logic.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bæˈɹɒk/
Rhymes: -ɒk
  • (US) IPA(key): /bəˈɹoʊk/
Rhymes: -əʊk

Adjective

baroque (comparative baroquer, superlative baroquest)

  1. Ornate, intricate, decorated, laden with detail.
  2. Complex and beautiful, despite an outward irregularity.
  3. Chiseled from stone, or shaped from wood, in a garish, crooked, twisted, or slanted sort of way, grotesque.
  4. Embellished with figures and forms such that every level of relief gives way to more details and contrasts.
  5. Characteristic of Western art music of about the same period.

Derived terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Baquero

French

Etymology

Middle French baroque, originally denoting a pearl of irregular shape, from Italian barocco, Spanish barrueco, or Portuguese barroco, all possibly from Latin verrūca (wart).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.ʁɔk/

Adjective

baroque (plural baroques)

  1. baroque (all senses)

Descendants

  • English: baroque
  • Spanish: barroco

Further reading

  • “baroque” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).


English

Adjective

churrigueresque (not comparable)

  1. Alternative form of Churrigueresque

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