barrack vs inspire what difference

what is difference between barrack and inspire

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæ.ɹək/

Etymology 1

From French baraque; from Catalan barraca.

Noun

barrack (plural barracks)

  1. (military, chiefly in the plural) A building for soldiers, especially within a garrison; originally referred to temporary huts, now usually to a permanent structure or set of buildings.
    • 1919, House Committee on Military Affairs, Army Reorganization: Hearings Before the Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives, 66th Congress, 1st Session, on H.R. 8287, H.R. 8068, H.R. 7925, H.R. 8870, Sept. 3, 1919-Nov. 12, 1919, Parts 23-43, page 1956,
      How do you distinguish between the disciplinary barracks and the penitentiary? Where are the disciplinary barracks ?
  2. (chiefly in the plural) A primitive structure resembling a long shed or barn for (usually temporary) housing or other purposes.
  3. (by extension, chiefly in the plural) Any very plain, monotonous, or ugly large building.
  4. (US) A (structure with a) movable roof sliding on four posts, to cover hay, straw, etc.
  5. (Ireland, colloquial, usually in the plural) A police station.
Translations

Verb

barrack (third-person singular simple present barracks, present participle barracking, simple past and past participle barracked)

  1. (transitive) To house military personnel; to quarter.
  2. (intransitive) To live in barracks.

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

barrack (third-person singular simple present barracks, present participle barracking, simple past and past participle barracked)

  1. (Britain, transitive) To jeer and heckle; to attempt to disconcert by verbal means.
    Synonyms: badger, jeer, tease, make fun of
    • 2009, Jimmy Greaves, The Heart of the Game, unnumbered page,
      Its basic tenet was to say that if those Arsenal supporters who barracked the board at home games could do any better, let them come forward, put some money in the club, and have a go at being directors themselves. In short, ‘Put up or shut up’, which, of course, only encouraged Johnny and One-armed Lou to heckle the Arsenal board even more. Dear old Dennis, he had no idea the barracking he and his fellow Arsenal directors suffered at every home game came from Spurs supporters.
  2. (Australia, New Zealand, intransitive) To cheer for or support a team.
    Synonyms: cheer, (US) root for
    • 2010, John Cash, Joy Damousi, Footy Passions, page 75,
      ‘So to me barracking for the footy I identified with my father, although nobody barracked for Essendon.’


English

Etymology

From Middle English inspiren, enspiren, from Old French inspirer, variant of espirer, from Latin īnspīrāre, present active infinitive of īnspīrō (inspire), itself a loan-translation of Biblical Ancient Greek πνέω (pnéō, breathe), from in + spīrō (breathe).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɪn.ˈspaɪɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɪn.ˈspaɪə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -aɪə(ɹ)

Verb

inspire (third-person singular simple present inspires, present participle inspiring, simple past and past participle inspired)

  1. (transitive) To infuse into the mind; to communicate to the spirit; to convey, as by a divine or supernatural influence; to disclose preternaturally; to produce in, as by inspiration.
  2. (transitive) To infuse into; to affect, as with a superior or supernatural influence; to fill with what animates, enlivens or exalts; to communicate inspiration to.
    • Erato, thy poet’s mind inspire, / And fill his soul with thy celestial fire.
  3. (intransitive) To draw in by the operation of breathing; to inhale.
    • 1672 Gideon Harvey, Morbus Anglicus, Or, The Anatomy of Consumptions
      By means of those sulfurous coal smokes the lungs are as it were stifled and extremely oppressed, whereby they are forced to inspire and expire the air with difficulty.
  4. To infuse by breathing, or as if by breathing.
  5. (archaic, transitive) To breathe into; to fill with the breath; to animate.
  6. (transitive) To spread rumour indirectly.
Conjugation

Synonyms

  • beghast

Antonyms

  • (inhale): expire

Derived terms

  • awe-inspiring
  • inspirable
  • inspirer
  • reinspire

Related terms

  • inspiration
  • inspirational
  • inspirator
  • inspiratory

Translations

Anagrams

  • spinier

Asturian

Verb

inspire

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of inspirar

French

Pronunciation

Verb

inspire

  1. inflection of inspirer:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Portuguese

Verb

inspire

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of inspirar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of inspirar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of inspirar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of inspirar

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [inˈspire]

Verb

inspire

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of inspira
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of inspira

Spanish

Verb

inspire

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of inspirar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of inspirar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of inspirar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of inspirar.

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial