barrack vs scoff what difference

what is difference between barrack and scoff

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæ.ɹək/

Etymology 1

From French baraque; from Catalan barraca.

Noun

barrack (plural barracks)

  1. (military, chiefly in the plural) A building for soldiers, especially within a garrison; originally referred to temporary huts, now usually to a permanent structure or set of buildings.
    • 1919, House Committee on Military Affairs, Army Reorganization: Hearings Before the Committee on Military Affairs, House of Representatives, 66th Congress, 1st Session, on H.R. 8287, H.R. 8068, H.R. 7925, H.R. 8870, Sept. 3, 1919-Nov. 12, 1919, Parts 23-43, page 1956,
      How do you distinguish between the disciplinary barracks and the penitentiary? Where are the disciplinary barracks ?
  2. (chiefly in the plural) A primitive structure resembling a long shed or barn for (usually temporary) housing or other purposes.
  3. (by extension, chiefly in the plural) Any very plain, monotonous, or ugly large building.
  4. (US) A (structure with a) movable roof sliding on four posts, to cover hay, straw, etc.
  5. (Ireland, colloquial, usually in the plural) A police station.
Translations

Verb

barrack (third-person singular simple present barracks, present participle barracking, simple past and past participle barracked)

  1. (transitive) To house military personnel; to quarter.
  2. (intransitive) To live in barracks.

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb

barrack (third-person singular simple present barracks, present participle barracking, simple past and past participle barracked)

  1. (Britain, transitive) To jeer and heckle; to attempt to disconcert by verbal means.
    Synonyms: badger, jeer, tease, make fun of
    • 2009, Jimmy Greaves, The Heart of the Game, unnumbered page,
      Its basic tenet was to say that if those Arsenal supporters who barracked the board at home games could do any better, let them come forward, put some money in the club, and have a go at being directors themselves. In short, ‘Put up or shut up’, which, of course, only encouraged Johnny and One-armed Lou to heckle the Arsenal board even more. Dear old Dennis, he had no idea the barracking he and his fellow Arsenal directors suffered at every home game came from Spurs supporters.
  2. (Australia, New Zealand, intransitive) To cheer for or support a team.
    Synonyms: cheer, (US) root for
    • 2010, John Cash, Joy Damousi, Footy Passions, page 75,
      ‘So to me barracking for the footy I identified with my father, although nobody barracked for Essendon.’


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /skɒf/
  • (US) IPA(key): /skɔːf/
  • (cotcaught merger, Inland Northern American) IPA(key): /skɑːf/
  • Rhymes: -ɒf

Etymology 1

From Middle English scof/skof, of Scandinavian origin. Compare Old Norse skaup, Danish skuffelse(noun)/skuffe(verb) and Old High German scoph.

Noun

scoff (plural scoffs)

  1. A derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
    Synonyms: derision, ridicule; see also Thesaurus:ridicule
    • 1852, The Dublin University Magazine (page 66)
      There were sneers, and scoffs, and inuendoes of some; prophecies of failure in a hundred ways []
  2. An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
    • the scoff of wither’d age and beardless youth
Translations

Verb

scoff (third-person singular simple present scoffs, present participle scoffing, simple past and past participle scoffed)

  1. (intransitive) To jeer; to laugh with contempt and derision.
    Synonym: sneer
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      Truth from his lips prevailed with double sway, / And fools who came to scoff, remained to pray.
  2. (transitive) To mock; to treat with scorn.
    Synonyms: contemn, deride
Conjugation
Translations

Etymology 2

A variant, attested since the mid 19th century, of scaff, of uncertain origin. Compare scarf (eat quickly).

Noun

scoff (countable and uncountable, plural scoffs)

  1. (South Africa and British Army slang) Food.
  2. (slang) The act of eating.
    • 2016, Fearne Cotton, Cook Happy, Cook Healthy
      Lunch for the busy has become a quick scoff of processed, terrifyingly orange couscous, []
Translations

Verb

scoff (third-person singular simple present scoffs, present participle scoffing, simple past and past participle scoffed)

  1. (Britain, slang) To eat food quickly.
    Synonyms: gobble, (US) scarf
  2. (South Africa and British Army slang) To eat.
Translations

See also

  • scuff

References


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