barrage vs battery what difference

what is difference between barrage and battery

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French barrage (barrage, barrier). Compare barrier.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbæɹɑːʒ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /bəˈɹɑːʒ/

Noun

barrage (plural barrages)

  1. An artificial obstruction, such as a dam, in a river designed to increase its depth or to divert its flow.
    Hyponym: dam
  2. (military) A heavy curtain of artillery fire directed in front of one’s own troops to screen and protect them.
    • 2014, Edward G. Lengel, A Companion to the Meuse-Argonne Campaign, John Wiley & Sons (→ISBN), page 350:
      The 75s of V Corps fired a standard rolling barrage, while the larger 155 mm and 8-inch pieces fired standing barrages 500 meters beyond the barrage line. For the rolling barrage, one battery in each battalion fired low, bursting shrapnel instead of the standard high explosive.
  3. A concentrated discharge of projectile weapons.
  4. (by extension) An overwhelming outburst of words, especially of criticism.
  5. (fencing) A “next hit wins” contest to determine the winner of a bout in case of a tie.
  6. Type of firework containing a mixture of firework types in one single-ignition package.

Derived terms

  • barrage balloon
  • barrage jamming
  • rolling barrage

Translations

Verb

barrage (third-person singular simple present barrages, present participle barraging, simple past and past participle barraged)

  1. (transitive) To direct a barrage at.
    Synonym: bombard

Further reading

  • barrage (dam) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • barrage (artillery) on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

French

Etymology

barrer +‎ -age

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.ʁaʒ/, /bɑ.ʁaʒ/

Noun

barrage m (plural barrages)

  1. dam, barrage
  2. barrier, roadblock

Derived terms

  • faire barrage à
  • tir de barrage

Further reading

  • “barrage” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • bagarre, bagarré


English

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle French batterie, from Old French baterie (action of beating), from batre (battre), from Latin battuō (beat), from Gaulish. Doublet of batterie.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbætəɹi/, /ˈbætɹi/
  • Hyphenation: bat‧te‧ry

Noun

battery (countable and uncountable, plural batteries)

  1. (countable, electronics) A device used to power electric devices, consisting of a set of electrically connected electrochemical or, archaically, electrostatic cells. A single such cell when used by itself.
    • 1749 Benjamin Franklin, letter to Peter Collinson
      Upon this We made what we call’d an Electrical Battery, consisting of eleven Panes of large Sash Glass, arm’d with thin leaden Plates, pasted on each Side…
      A Turky is to be killed for our Dinners by the Electrical Shock; and roasted by the electrical Jack, before a Fire kindled by the Electrified Bottle; when the Healths of all the Famous Electricians in England, France and Germany, are to be drank in Electrified Bumpers, under the Discharge of Guns from the Electrical Battery.
  2. (law) The infliction of unlawful physical violence on a person, legally distinguished from assault, which includes the threat of impending violence.
    • 2003, Mike Molan, Modern Criminal Law, section 7.2.2-3:
      A battery is the actual infliction of unlawful personal violence. […] [The defendant] fell to the ground and lashed out with his feet and in doing so kicked the hand of one of the police officers, fracturing a bone. He was charged with assault […] although this was a battery.
  3. (countable) A coordinated group of artillery weapons.
  4. (historical, archaic) An elevated platform on which cannon could be placed.
  5. An array of similar things.
    Schoolchildren take a battery of standard tests to measure their progress.
  6. A set of small cages where hens are kept for the purpose of farming their eggs.
  7. (baseball) The catcher and the pitcher together
  8. (chess) Two or more major pieces on the same rank, file, or diagonal
  9. (music) A marching percussion ensemble; a drumline.
  10. The state of a firearm when it is possible to be fired.
  11. (archaic) Apparatus for preparing or serving meals.

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • accumulator
  • assault

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