base vs stand what difference

what is difference between base and stand

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: bās, IPA(key): /beɪs/
  • (Ireland) IPA(key): /beːs/
  • Hyphenation: base
  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • Homophone: bass

Etymology 1

From Middle English base, bas, baas, from Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis). Doublet of basis.

Noun

base (plural bases)

  1. Something from which other things extend; a foundation.
    1. A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.
  2. The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.
  3. A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.
  4. The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.
  5. (cooking, painting, pharmacy) A basic but essential component or ingredient.
  6. A substance used as a mordant in dyeing.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Ure to this entry?)
  7. (cosmetics) Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.
  8. (chemistry) Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.
  9. Important areas in games and sports.
    1. A safe zone in the children’s games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.
    2. (baseball) One of the four places that a runner can stand without being subject to being tagged out when the ball is in play.
  10. (architecture) The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.
  11. (biology, biochemistry) A nucleotide’s nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.
  12. (botany) The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.
  13. (electronics) The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).
  14. (geometry) The lowest side of a in a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.
  15. (heraldry) The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.
  16. (heraldry) The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.
  17. (mathematics) A number raised to the power of an exponent.
    The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3.
  18. (mathematics) Synonym of radix.
  19. (topology) The set of sets from which a topology is generated.
  20. (topology) A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.
  21. (group theory) A sequence of elements not jointly stabilized by any nontrivial group element.
  22. (acrobatics, cheerleading) In hand-to-hand balance, the person who supports the flyer; the person that remains in contact with the ground.
  23. (linguistics) A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.
  24. (music) Dated form of bass.
    • 1682, John Dryden, Mac Flecknoe
      The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
  25. (military, historical) The smallest kind of cannon.
  26. (archaic) The housing of a horse.
  27. (historical, in the plural) A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.
  28. (obsolete) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.
  29. (obsolete) An apron.
    • 1613, John Marston, The Insatiate Countess
      bakers in their linen bases
  30. A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Lyman to this entry?)
  31. (politics) A group of voters who almost always support a single party’s candidates for elected office.
  32. (Marxism) The forces and relations of production that produce the necessities and amenities of life.
  33. A material that holds paint or other materials together; a binder.
  34. (aviation) Short for base leg.
Synonyms
  • (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid): alkali
Antonyms
  • (chemical compound that will neutralize an alkali): acid
  • (end of a leaf): apex
Hyponyms
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also

Other terms used in arithmetic operations:

Advanced hyperoperations: tetration, pentation, hexation

Verb

base (third-person singular simple present bases, present participle basing, simple past and past participle based)

  1. (transitive) To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.
  2. (transitive) To be located (at a particular place).
  3. (acrobatics, cheerleading) To act as a base; to be the person supporting the flyer.
    • 2005, John T. Warren, Laura B. Lengel, Casting Gender: Women and Performance in Intercultural Context, →ISBN, page 73:
      Apart from time taken out during radio- and chemotherapy, Maurs continued to participate in POW. She would base a flyer in a double balance and make the audience laugh with her clowning antics for two more shows.
Derived terms
  • base on
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English base, bas, from Old French bas, from Late Latin bassus (low). Cognate with Spanish bajo, Italian basso and base.

Adjective

base (comparative baser or more base, superlative basest or most base)

  1. (obsolete) Low in height; short.
  2. Low in place or position.
  3. (obsolete) Of low value or degree.
    • If thou livest in paine and sorrow, thy base courage is the cause of it, To die there wanteth but will.
  4. (archaic) Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.
    • 1623, Francis Bacon, De Augmentis Scientiarum
      a peasant and base swain
  5. Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.
    • 1551, Ralph Robynson (translator}, More’s Utopia
      a cruel act of a base and a cowardish mind
  6. (now rare) Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.
  7. (of a metal) Not considered precious or noble.
  8. Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.
  9. (obsolete) Of illegitimate birth; bastard.
  10. Not classical or correct.
    • base Latin
  11. Obsolete form of bass.
  12. (law) Not held by honourable service.
Usage notes
  • Said of fellows, motives, occupations, etc.
Synonyms
  • (low, short): little, petite, short
  • (of position): low-lying, lowland
  • (of value): See Thesaurus:insignificant
  • (vulgar, common): common, low-born, lowly, plebeian, vulgar
  • (immoral): See Thesaurus:despicable or Thesaurus:evil
  • (of inferior quality): See Thesaurus:low-quality
  • (describing metals):
  • (of illegitimate birth): See Thesaurus:illegitimate
  • (not classical):
  • (not held by honourable service):
Antonyms
  • likeable
  • desirable
  • admirable
  • noble
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

Probably a specific use of Etymology 1, above; perhaps also a development of the plural of bar.

Noun

base (uncountable)

  1. (now chiefly US, historical) The game of prisoners’ bars. [from 15th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.8:
      So ran they all, as they had bene at bace, / They being chased that did others chase.

Etymology 4

Variant forms.

Noun

base

  1. Alternative form of BASE
Derived terms
  • base jumper
  • base jumping

Further reading

  • base on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Base in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)
  • base in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • base in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Abes, EABs, EBSA, baes, seba

Afrikaans

Noun

base

  1. plural of baas

Asturian

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. base

Related terms

  • basar
  • básicu

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ˈba.zə/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈba.ze/

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. base
  2. basis
  3. grounding
  4. foundation

Derived terms

  • base de dades

Related terms

  • basar
  • basal
  • bàsic

Further reading

  • “base” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Czech

Etymology 1

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbasɛ]

Noun

base

  1. dative singular of basa
  2. locative singular of basa
  3. vocative singular of bas
  4. locative singular of bas

Etymology 2

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbaːzɛ]

Noun

base f

  1. Obsolete form of báze.

Declension


Danish

Noun

base c (singular definite basen, plural indefinite baser)

  1. (chemistry) base (generally understood to be a Brønsted-Lowry base)
  2. (military) base
  3. headquarters

Declension

Synonyms

  • (headquarters): hovedkvarter

Dutch

Alternative forms

  • basis (obsolete in this sense)

Etymology

Borrowed from French base, from Latin basis. Doublet of basis. Also a distant doublet of komst, via Proto-Indo-European *gʷḿ̥tis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaː.zə/
  • Hyphenation: ba‧se
  • Rhymes: -aːzə

Noun

base f (plural basen, diminutive basetje n)

  1. (chemistry) base (class of compounds), alkali

Synonyms

  • loog

Antonyms

  • zuur

Derived terms

  • basisch
  • basenpaar
  • basenvolgorde
  • Lewisbase

Descendants

  • Indonesian: basa

References

  • “base” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French

Etymology

From Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baz/, /bɑz/
  • (France) IPA(key): [baz]
  • (Quebec, formal) IPA(key): [bɑːz]
  • (Quebec, informal) IPA(key): [bɑʊ̯z]

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. base (bottom part of something)
  2. base (safe place)
  3. base, basis (fundamental belief)
  4. (chemistry) base
Derived terms

Further reading

  • “base” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. base

Related terms

  • basear
  • básico

Italian

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.ze/

Noun

base f (plural basi)

  1. base, alkaline
  2. basis
  3. (figuratively) mainstay

Antonyms

  • sommità, altezza

Related terms

  • basare
  • basico
  • basilare
  • di base
  • in base a

Latin

Noun

base

  1. ablative singular of basis

Middle English

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Old French base, from Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βᾰ́σῐς (básis), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷémtis.

Alternative forms

  • bace, bas, baas, basse

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbaːs(ə)/

Noun

base (plural bases)

  1. A foundation or base; the bottom of a building.
  2. The foundation, base, or bottom of a column, statue, or vase.
  3. (rare) Padding inserted below a horse’s bridle.
  4. (rare) A hand’s palm; the section of a hand below the fingers.
  5. (rare) The bottom portion of a dress.
  6. (rare, alchemy) The mix of metals used as a base for alchemical operations.
Descendants
  • English: base
  • Scots: base
References
  • “bās(e, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-03.

Etymology 2

Adjective

base

  1. Alternative form of bas

Etymology 3

Noun

base

  1. Alternative form of bace

Moore

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bà.se/

Verb

base

  1. to leave
  2. to cancel, stop, cease
  3. to abandon, throw away

Northern Sami

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈpase/

Verb

base

  1. inflection of bassit:
    1. present indicative connegative
    2. second-person singular imperative
    3. imperative connegative

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From English base, and French base (in chemistry)

Noun

base m (definite singular basen, indefinite plural baser, definite plural basene)

  1. (chemistry, military, general) a base

Derived terms

References

  • “base” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From English base, and French base (in chemistry)

Noun

base m (definite singular basen, indefinite plural basar, definite plural basane)

  1. (chemistry, military, general) a base

Derived terms

  • basisk
  • database
  • marinebase
  • militærbase

References

  • “base” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old French

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Noun

base f (oblique plural bases, nominative singular base, nominative plural bases)

  1. base (bottom part; supporting part)

Descendants

  • French: base
  • Middle English: base, bace, bas, baas, basse
    • English: base
    • Scots: base

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (base, supplement)

Portuguese

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧se
  • Rhymes: -azi, -azɨ

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. basis
  2. base
  3. (chemistry) base
    Antonym: ácido
  4. groundwork

Spanish

Etymology

From Latin basis, from Ancient Greek βάσις (básis).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbase/, [ˈba.se]

Noun

base f (plural bases)

  1. base
  2. basis
  3. (linear algebra) basis
    • Base on the Spanish Wikipedia.Wikipedia es
  4. grounding
  5. foundation
  6. (basketball) point guard
    • Base on the Spanish Wikipedia.Wikipedia es
  7. (baseball) base

Derived terms

  • a base de
  • a base de bien
  • barrebases
  • base aérea
  • base refrigeradora
  • base de datos
  • en base de
  • pasta base
  • placa base

Related terms

  • basar
  • basal
  • básico

Verb

base

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of basar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of basar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of basar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of basar.

Tagalog

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish base (basis). The baseball definition is from English base, but pronounced the same as the Spanish word.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ba‧se
  • IPA(key): /ˈbasɛ/, [ˈbɐsɛ]

Noun

base

  1. base; basis
    Synonyms: batayan, tuntunin, pamantayan
  2. (baseball) base

Derived terms


Venetian

Adjective

base f

  1. feminine plural of baso


English

Etymology

From Middle English standen, from Old English standan (to stand, occupy a place, be valid, stand good, be, exist, take place, consist, be fixed, remain undisturbed, stand still, cease to move, remain without motion, stop, maintain one’s position, not yield to pressure, reside, abide, continue, remain, not to fall, be upheld), from Proto-Germanic *standaną (to stand), from Pre-Germanic *sth₂-n-t-´, an innovative extended n-infixed form of Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stænd/
  • (/æ/ tensing) IPA(key): [steənd]
  • Rhymes: -ænd

Verb

stand (third-person singular simple present stands, present participle standing, simple past stood, past participle stood or (obsolete) standen or (nonstandard) stand)

  1. (heading) To position or be positioned physically.
    1. (intransitive, copulative) To support oneself on the feet in an erect position.
    2. (intransitive) To rise to one’s feet; to stand up.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To remain motionless.
      • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Matthew 2:9,[1]
        The star, which they saw in the east, went before them, till it came and stood over where the young child was.
      • Turning back, then, toward the basement staircase, she began to grope her way through blinding darkness, but had taken only a few uncertain steps when, of a sudden, she stopped short and for a little stood like a stricken thing, quite motionless save that she quaked to her very marrow in the grasp of a great and enervating fear.
    4. (intransitive) To be placed in an upright or vertical orientation.
      • He seized the gun which always stood in a corner of his bedroom [].
    5. (transitive) To place in an upright or standing position.
    6. (intransitive) To occupy or hold a place; to be set, placed, fixed, located, or situated.
      • 1774, Edward Long, The History of Jamaica. Or, General Survey of the Antient and Modern State of that Island, volume 2, book 2, chapter 7, 6:
        The chapel ſtands on the South ſide of the ſquare, near the governor’s houſe.
      • 2017 October 2, “Las Vegas shooting: At least 58 dead at Mandalay Bay Hotel”, in bbc.com, BBC:
        Las Vegas police say the number of people injured now stands at 515.
    7. (intransitive) To measure when erect on the feet.
      • 1855, Alfred Tennyson, Maud, XIII, 1. in Maud, and Other Poems, London: Edward Moxon, p. 44,[2]
        His face, as I grant, in spite of spite, / Has a broad-blown comeliness, red and white, / And six feet two, as I think, he stands;
    8. (intransitive, of tears, sweat, etc.) To be present, to have welled up.
      • c. 1590, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 3, Act V, Scene 6,[3]
        many an orphan’s water-standing eye
      • 1651, Francis Bacon, A True and Historical Relation of the Poysoning of Sir Thomas Overbury, London: John Benson & John Playford, “Sir Jervas his Confession,” p. 71,[4]
        now my heart beginneth to melt within me being wounded (with that the tears stood in his eyes) to see the faces of some here present, whom J most earnestly love, and now must depart from with shame []
      • 1722, Daniel Defoe, Moll Flanders, London: W. Chetwood & T. Edling, p. 222,[5]
        [he] pull’d me up again, and then giving me two or three Kisses again, thank’d me for my kind yielding to him; and was so overcome with the Satisfaction and Joy of it, that I saw Tears stand in his Eyes.
      • 1844, Charles Dickens, Martin Chuzzlewit, London: Chapman & Hall, Chapter 32, p. 380,[6]
        He takes me half-price to the play, to an extent which I sometimes fear is beyond his means; and I see the tears a standing in his eyes during the whole performance []
      • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
        How he escaped a broken neck in that dreadful place no human being will ever ken. The sweat, he has told me, stood in cold drops upon his forehead []
  2. (heading) To position or be positioned mentally.
    1. (intransitive, followed by to + infinitive) To be positioned to gain or lose.
    2. (transitive, negative) To tolerate.
    3. (intransitive, copulative) To maintain one’s ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.
      • February 2, 1712, Joseph Addison, The Spectator No. 291
        readers by whose judgment I would stand or fall
    4. (intransitive, copulative) To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition.
      • The king granted the Jews [] to gather themselves together, and to stand for their life.
      • July 29, 1660, Robert South, sermon preached at St. Mary’s Church in Oxon
        the standing pattern of their imitation
    5. (intransitive, copulative, obsolete) To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist.
      • sacrifices [] which stood only in meats and drinks
      • Accomplish what your signs foreshow; / I stand resigned, and am prepared to go.
  3. (heading) To position or be positioned socially.
    1. (intransitive, cricket) To act as an umpire.
    2. (transitive) To undergo; withstand; hold up.
      • Love stood the siege.
      • Bid him disband his legions, [] / And stand the judgment of a Roman senate.
    3. (intransitive, Britain) To seek election.
      • 1678, Izaak Walton, The Life of Robert Sanderson
        He stood to be elected one of the proctors of the university.
    4. (intransitive) To be valid.
    5. (transitive) To oppose, usually as a team, in competition.
      • 1957, Matt Christopher, Basketball Sparkplug, Ch.7:
        “Kim, Jack, and I will stand you guys,” Jimmie Burdette said. ¶ “We’ll smear you!” laughed Ron.
      • c. 1973, R. J. Childerhose, Hockey Fever in Goganne Falls, p.95:
        The game stopped while sides were sorted out. Andy did the sorting. “Okay,” he said. “Jimmy is coming out. He and Gaston and Ike and me will stand you guys.”
      • 1978, Louis Sachar, Sideways Stories from Wayside School, Ch.21:
        “Hey, Louis,” Dameon shouted. “Do you want to play kickball?” ¶ “”All right,” said Louis. “Ron and I will both play.” [] ¶ “Ron and I will stand everybody!” Louis announced.
    6. (transitive) To cover the expense of; to pay for.
    7. (intransitive) To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation.
    8. (intransitive) To be consistent; to agree; to accord.
      • c. 1619, Philip Massinger and Nathan Field, The Fatal Dowry
        Doubt me not; by heaven, I will do nothing / But what may stand with honour.
    9. (intransitive) To appear in court.
      (Can we find and add a quotation of Burrill to this entry?)
  4. (intransitive, nautical) Of a ship or its captain, to steer, sail (in a specified direction, for a specified destination etc.).
    • 1630, John Smith, True Travels, in Kupperman 1988, p.40:
      To repaire his defects, hee stood for the coast of Calabria, but hearing there was six or seven Galleyes at Mesina hee departed thence for Malta [].
  5. (intransitive, copulative) To remain without ruin or injury.
    • 1692, John Dryden, Cleomenes, the Spartan Hero, a Tragedy
      My mind on its own centre stands unmov’d.
  6. (card games) To stop asking for more cards; to keep one’s hand as it has been dealt so far.
Conjugation

Usage notes

  • In older works, standen is found as a past participle of this verb; it is now archaic. The forms stooden and stand may also be found in dialectal speech; these are nonstandard.
  • (tolerate): This is almost always found in a negative form such as can’t stand, or No-one can stand… In this sense it is a catenative verb that takes the gerund -ing or infinitive to…. See Appendix:English catenative verbs.

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

stand (plural stands)

  1. The act of standing.
    • October 2, 1712, Joseph Addison, The Spectator No. 499
      I took my stand upon an eminence [] to look into their several ladings.
  2. A defensive position or effort.
  3. A resolute, unwavering position; firm opinion; action for a purpose in the face of opposition.
  4. A period of performance in a given location or venue.
  5. A device to hold something upright or aloft.
    • There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger’s weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock-paper on the walls.
  6. The platform on which a witness testifies in court; the witness stand or witness box.
  7. A particular grove or other group of trees or shrubs.
  8. (forestry) A contiguous group of trees sufficiently uniform in age-class distribution, composition, and structure, and growing on a site of sufficiently uniform quality, to be a distinguishable unit.
  9. A standstill, a motionless state, as of someone confused, or a hunting dog who has found game.
    • 1625, Francis Bacon, “Of Truth”, Essays
      One of the later school of the Grecians, examineth the matter, and is at a stand, to think what should be in it, that men should love lies; where neither they make for pleasure, as with poets, nor for advantage, as with the merchant; but for the lie’s sake.
    • 1819, Lord Byron, Don Juan, I.168:
      Antonia’s patience now was at a stand
      “Come, come, ‘t is no time now for fooling there,”
      She whispered []
  10. A small building, booth, or stage, as in a bandstand or hamburger stand.
  11. A designated spot where someone or something may stand or wait.
  12. (US, dated) The situation of a shop, store, hotel, etc.
  13. (sports) Grandstand. (often in the plural)
  14. (cricket) A partnership.
  15. (military, plural often stand) A single set, as of arms.
    • 1927, Herbert Asbury, The Gangs of New York: An Informal History of the Underworld, Paragon House (1990), →ISBN, p.170:
      The police and troops captured eleven thousand stand of arms, including muskets and pistols, together with several thousand bludgeons and other weapons.
  16. (obsolete) Rank; post; station; standing.
    • Father, since your fortune did attain
      So high a stand, I mean not to descend.
  17. (dated) A state of perplexity or embarrassment.
  18. A young tree, usually reserved when other trees are cut; also, a tree growing or standing upon its own root, in distinction from one produced from a scion set in a stock, either of the same or another kind of tree.
  19. (obsolete) A weight of from two hundred and fifty to three hundred pounds, used in weighing pitch.
  20. A location or position where one may stand.
    • c. 1604 Measure for Measure by William Shakespeare
      Come, I have found you out a stand most fit, / Where you may have such vantage on the duke, / He shall not pass you.

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Catalan: estand
  • Italian: stand
  • Portuguese: estande
  • Spanish: estand

Translations

Related terms

  • stance
  • stanza

Anagrams

  • Dants, Sandt, dasn’t, tdnas

Danish

Etymology

From the verb stande, influenced by Middle Low German stant, German Stand and (in the sense “booth”) English stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈsd̥anˀ]

Noun

stand c (singular definite standen, plural indefinite stænder)

  1. position, social status, station
  2. class, rank
  3. occupation, trade, profession
  4. estate

Inflection

Noun

stand c (singular definite standen, plural indefinite stande)

  1. stand (device to hold something upright or aloft)
  2. stand (small building or booth)
  3. (uncountable) condition, repair

Inflection

Related terms

  • godt i stand
  • i stand til

References

  • “stand” in Den Danske Ordbog

Dutch

Etymology 1

From Old Dutch *stand, from Proto-Germanic *standaz. Related to staan.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: stand
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt

Noun

stand m (plural standen, diminutive standje n)

  1. posture, position, bearing
  2. rank, standing, station; class
  3. score (of a game, match)
Synonyms
  • (posture): houding
  • (rank): rang, klasse
  • (score): score
Derived terms
  • adelstand
  • burgerstand
  • slaapstand
  • speelstand
  • standenmaatschappij
  • standje
  • waterstand
Descendants
  • Negerhollands: stand

Etymology 2

From English stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: stand

Noun

stand m (plural stands, diminutive standje n)

  1. stand (small building or booth)
Synonyms
  • kraam

Anagrams

  • danst

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑ̃d/

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. stand

Derived terms

  • stand de tir


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʃtant/
  • Rhymes: -ant

Verb

stand

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of stehen

Gothic

Romanization

stand

  1. Romanization of ????????????????????

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʃtɒnd]
  • Hyphenation: stand
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Noun

stand

  1. stand, booth, stall, kiosk (a small enclosed structure, often freestanding, open on one side or with a window, used as a booth to sell newspapers, cigarettes, etc., on the street or in a market)
    Synonym: bódé

Declension

References

Further reading

  • stand in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Italian

Etymology

From English stand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstɛnd/

Noun

stand m (invariable)

  1. stand, booth, stall, pavilion (at a fair)
  2. stand, gallery (at a sporting event)
  3. stand, case (in a store, supermarket)
  4. stall (at a shooting range)

Synonyms

  • (at a fair, shooting range): padiglione

Derived terms

  • standista

References

Further reading

  • stand in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the old verb stande (replaced by stå), and English stand (sense 3)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural stander, definite plural standene)

  1. condition, order, state
  2. height, level, reading
  3. a stand (e.g. at an exhibition)

Derived terms

  • husstand
  • i stand til
  • standpunkt
  • vannstand

References

  • “stand” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From the old verb stande (replaced by stå).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑnd/, /stɑnː/ (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural standar, definite plural standane)

  1. condition, order, state
  2. height, level, reading
Derived terms
Related terms

Etymology 2

From German Stand. Doublet of Etymology 1.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑnd/, /stɑnː/ (examples of pronunciation)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural stender, definite plural stendene)

  1. (historical) an estate (social class)
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From English stand. Doublet of Etymology 1.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stænd/, /stænː/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

stand m (definite singular standen, indefinite plural standar, definite plural standane)

  1. a stand (e.g. at an exhibition)

References

  • “stand” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *standaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /stɑnd/

Noun

stand m

  1. (rare) delay

Declension


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *standaz, whence also Old English stand.

Noun

stand m

  1. stand (clarification of this definition is needed)

Portuguese

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. Alternative form of estande

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstand/, [ˈst̪ãn̪d̪]
  • IPA(key): /esˈtand/, [esˈt̪ãn̪d̪]

Noun

stand m (plural stands)

  1. stand (enclosed structure in the street)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial