bash vs blast what difference

what is difference between bash and blast

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1

From a borrowing of Old Norse *baska (to strike), akin to Swedish basa (to baste, whip, lash, flog), Danish baske (to beat, strike, cudgel), German patschen (to slap).

Verb

bash (third-person singular simple present bashes, present participle bashing, simple past and past participle bashed)

  1. To strike heavily.
  2. To collide.
  3. To criticize harshly.
  4. (Britain, slang) To masturbate.
Derived terms
  • gay bash, gay-bash
  • trans bash, trans-bash
Translations

Noun

bash (plural bashes)

  1. (informal) A forceful blow or impact.
    He got a bash on the head.
  2. (informal) A large party; a gala event.
    They had a big bash to celebrate their tenth anniversary.
  3. (Britain, informal, often in the phrase ‘have a bash’) An attempt (at doing something).
    I’m not sure I’ll be any good at this, but let me have a bash.
    This was my first bash at macramé, so I’m quite pleased with how it’s turned out.
Derived terms
  • basher
  • bashment
  • on the bash
  • megabash
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English baschen, baissen. See abash.

Verb

bash (third-person singular simple present bashes, present participle bashing, simple past and past participle bashed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To abash; to disconcert or be disconcerted or put out of countenance.

References

Anagrams

  • AHBs, Bahs, HABs, HBAs, Habs, bahs, habs, shab

Albanian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Serbo-Croatian baš (exactly, just, right), present in most Balkan languages. Miklošič argued that the ultimate source is Turkish baş (head, leader).

Adverb

bash

  1. (used for emphasis, or as an intensifier) exactly, precisely, right

Etymology 2

From earlier *balsha, a derivative of ballë.

Noun

bash m (indefinite plural bashë, definite singular bashi, definite plural bashët)

  1. (nautical) bow (of ship)
  2. center (of room or chamber)
Related terms
  • ballë

References


Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • bashu

Etymology

Inherited from Latin bāsiō (I kiss). This is one of relatively few words for which the Daco-Romanian equivalent (in this case săruta) is not derived from the same Latin word.

Verb

bash (past participle bãshatã)

  1. I kiss.
  2. I embrace

Synonyms

  • (kiss): hiritsescu, gugustedz
  • (embrace): ambrãtsitedz, ambrats

Related terms

  • bãshari / bãshare
  • bãshat
  • dizbash
  • spribash

Yola

Noun

bash

  1. Alternative form of baush

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bläst, IPA(key): /blɑːst/
  • (US) enPR: blăst, IPA(key): /blæst/
  • Rhymes: -ɑːst
  • Rhymes: -æst

Etymology 1

From Middle English blast from Old English blǣst (blowing, blast), from Proto-Germanic *blēstaz, *blēstuz (blowing, blast). Cognate with obsolete German Blast (wind, blowing). More at blow.

Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. A violent gust of wind.
    • And see where surly Winter passes off, / Far to the north, and calls his ruffian blasts; / His blasts obey, and quit the howling hill.
  2. A forcible stream of gas or liquid from an orifice, for example from a bellows, the mouth, etc.
  3. A hit from a pipe.
  4. The continuous blowing to which one charge of ore or metal is subjected in a furnace
    many tons of iron were melted at a blast
    • 1957, H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry, p. 146:
      Blast was produced by bellows worked by four ‘blowers’, three of whom worked at a time while the fourth stood ready to replace one of the others.
  5. The exhaust steam from an engine, driving a column of air out of a boiler chimney, and thus creating an intense draught through the fire; also, any draught produced by the blast.
  6. An explosion, especially for the purpose of destroying a mass of rock, etc.
  7. An explosive charge for blasting.
    • 1852-1854, Charles Tomlinson, Cyclopaedia of Useful Arts
      Large blasts are often used.
  8. A loud, sudden sound.
    • c. 1832, William Cullen Bryant, The Battle-Field
      the blast of triumph o’er thy grave
  9. A sudden, pernicious effect, as if by a noxious wind, especially on animals and plants; a blight.
    • By the blast of God they perish, and by the breath of his nostrils are they consumed.
  10. (figuratively, informal) A good time; an enjoyable moment.
    We had a blast at the party last night.
  11. (marketing) A promotional message sent to an entire mailing list.
    an e-mail blast; a fax blast
  12. A flatulent disease of sheep.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English blasten, blesten, from Old English blǣstan (to blow, blast), from Proto-Germanic *blēstijaną. Compare Middle High German blesten (to stand out, plop, splash).

Verb

blast (third-person singular simple present blasts, present participle blasting, simple past and past participle blasted)

  1. (transitive) To make an impression on, by making a loud blast or din.
  2. (intransitive) To make a loud noise.
  3. (transitive) To shatter, as if by an explosion.
  4. (transitive) To open up a hole in, usually by means of a sudden and imprecise method (such as an explosion).
    Blast right through it.
  5. (transitive) To curse; to damn.
    Blast it! Foiled again.
  6. (transitive, science fiction) To shoot, especially with an energy weapon (as opposed to one which fires projectiles).
    Chewbacca blasted the Stormtroopers with his laser rifle.
  7. (soccer) To shoot; kick the ball in hope of scoring a goal.
  8. To criticize or reprimand severely; to verbally discipline or punish.
    My manager suddenly blasted me yesterday for being a little late to work for five days in a row, because I was never getting myself up on time.
  9. (transitive) To bring destruction or ruin on; to destroy.
  10. (transitive) To blight or wither.
    A cold wind blasted the rose plants.
  11. (intransitive, obsolete) To be blighted or withered.
    The bud blasted in the blossom.
  12. (intransitive, obsolete) To blow, for example on a trumpet.
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Italian: blastare
Translations

Interjection

blast

  1. (chiefly British, informal) To show displeasure or disappointment; damn
Usage notes

Can be used on its own or in the form “blast it!”.

Translations

Etymology 3

From Ancient Greek βλαστός (blastós, germ or sprout).

Noun

blast (plural blasts)

  1. (cytology) An immature or undifferentiated cell (e.g., lymphoblast, myeloblast).
Derived terms
  • blast cell
  • blastocyte
  • blastoma
Translations

Etymology 4

From BLAST (an acronym for Basic Local Alignment Search Tool).

Verb

blast (third-person singular simple present blasts, present participle blasting, simple past and past participle blasted)

  1. (biology, informal, transitive) To run a nucleotide sequence (for nucleic acids) or an amino acid sequence (for proteins) through a BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool).
    • 2004, Andreas Bommarius and Bettina Riebel-Bommarius, Biocatalysis: Fundamentals and Applications, p. 425:
      Blasting nucleotide sequences is not always that easy, because there is more ambiguity to the nucleotide sequence, and good hits have to have a 70% homology over the whole sequence to be reliable, compared to 25% with proteins.

Alternative forms

  • BLAST

Anagrams

  • Balts, blats

German

Verb

blast

  1. inflection of blasen:
    1. second-person plural present
    2. plural imperative

Irish

Etymology

From Ancient Greek βλαστός (blastós, germ, sprout).

Noun

blast m (genitive singular blast, nominative plural blastaí)

  1. (cytology) blast

Declension

Derived terms

  • -blast
  • blastchill (blast cell)

Mutation


Middle English

Alternative forms

  • blaste, blæst, blest

Etymology

From Old English blǣst, from Proto-West Germanic *blāstu, from Proto-Germanic *blēstuz; equivalent to blasen +‎ -th.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /blast/, /blɛːst/

Noun

blast (plural blastes)

  1. A blast; a sudden and forceful motion of wind.
  2. One’s breathing or respiring; the act of respiration.
  3. The blast produced by a musical instrument.
  4. An emission or expulsion of fire or flames.
  5. The sound produced by thunder or storms.
  6. (rare) The making of a pronouncement or proclamation.
  7. (rare) One’s spiritual essence; the soul.
  8. (rare) A striking or attack.
  9. (rare) Flatulence; the making of a fart.

Derived terms

  • blasten

Descendants

  • English: blast
  • Scots: blast

References

  • “blast, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-09-27.

Swedish

Noun

blast c (definite form blasten)

  1. (uncountable) The stem and leaves of a vegetable, of which you’re only supposed to eat the root. E.g. in potatoes or carrots.

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