bash vs brawl what difference

what is difference between bash and brawl

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1

From a borrowing of Old Norse *baska (to strike), akin to Swedish basa (to baste, whip, lash, flog), Danish baske (to beat, strike, cudgel), German patschen (to slap).

Verb

bash (third-person singular simple present bashes, present participle bashing, simple past and past participle bashed)

  1. To strike heavily.
  2. To collide.
  3. To criticize harshly.
  4. (Britain, slang) To masturbate.
Derived terms
  • gay bash, gay-bash
  • trans bash, trans-bash
Translations

Noun

bash (plural bashes)

  1. (informal) A forceful blow or impact.
    He got a bash on the head.
  2. (informal) A large party; a gala event.
    They had a big bash to celebrate their tenth anniversary.
  3. (Britain, informal, often in the phrase ‘have a bash’) An attempt (at doing something).
    I’m not sure I’ll be any good at this, but let me have a bash.
    This was my first bash at macramé, so I’m quite pleased with how it’s turned out.
Derived terms
  • basher
  • bashment
  • on the bash
  • megabash
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English baschen, baissen. See abash.

Verb

bash (third-person singular simple present bashes, present participle bashing, simple past and past participle bashed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To abash; to disconcert or be disconcerted or put out of countenance.

References

Anagrams

  • AHBs, Bahs, HABs, HBAs, Habs, bahs, habs, shab

Albanian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Serbo-Croatian baš (exactly, just, right), present in most Balkan languages. Miklošič argued that the ultimate source is Turkish baş (head, leader).

Adverb

bash

  1. (used for emphasis, or as an intensifier) exactly, precisely, right

Etymology 2

From earlier *balsha, a derivative of ballë.

Noun

bash m (indefinite plural bashë, definite singular bashi, definite plural bashët)

  1. (nautical) bow (of ship)
  2. center (of room or chamber)
Related terms
  • ballë

References


Aromanian

Alternative forms

  • bashu

Etymology

Inherited from Latin bāsiō (I kiss). This is one of relatively few words for which the Daco-Romanian equivalent (in this case săruta) is not derived from the same Latin word.

Verb

bash (past participle bãshatã)

  1. I kiss.
  2. I embrace

Synonyms

  • (kiss): hiritsescu, gugustedz
  • (embrace): ambrãtsitedz, ambrats

Related terms

  • bãshari / bãshare
  • bãshat
  • dizbash
  • spribash

Yola

Noun

bash

  1. Alternative form of baush

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /bɹɔːl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /bɹɔl/
  • (cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /bɹɑl/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːl

Etymology 1

The verb is derived from Late Middle English braulen, brall, brallen (to clamour, to shout; to quarrel; to boast); further etymology is uncertain, but the word could be related to bray and ultimately imitative. It may be cognate with Danish bralle (to chatter, jabber), Dutch brallen (to boast), Low German brallen (to brag), Middle High German prālen (to boast, flaunt) (modern German prahlen (to boast, flaunt, vaunt)).

The noun is derived from Middle English brall, bralle, braul, braule, brawle (disturbance, squabble; brawl), from the verb braulen: see above.

Noun

brawl (plural brawls)

  1. A disorderly argument or fight, usually with a large number of people involved.
    Synonyms: row, scuffle, squabble; see also Thesaurus:dispute, Thesaurus:fight
Derived terms
  • brawly
Translations

Verb

brawl (third-person singular simple present brawls, present participle brawling, simple past and past participle brawled)

  1. (intransitive) To engage in a brawl; to fight or quarrel.
    Synonyms: squabble, wrangle
  2. (intransitive) To create a disturbance; to complain loudly.
  3. (intransitive) Especially of a rapid stream running over stones: to make a loud, confused noise.
  4. (transitive) To pour abuse on; to scold.
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • brawler
  • brawling (noun)
Translations

Etymology 2

Possibly from French branler (to shake), from Old French brandeler (to shake, wave; to agitate), from brand, branc (blade of a sword), from Vulgar Latin *brandus (firebrand; flaming sword; sword), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰrenu- (to burn).

Verb

brawl (third-person singular simple present brawls, present participle brawling, simple past and past participle brawled)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To move to and fro, to quiver, to shake.
    Synonyms: vibrate, waver

Etymology 3

From French branle (type of dance; an act of shaking, a shake), from branler (to shake), from Old French brandeler (to shake, wave; to agitate); see further at etymology 2.

Alternatively, the word could be derived from brawl ((obsolete) to move to and fro, quiver, shake): see etymology 2.

Noun

brawl (plural brawls)

  1. (dance, obsolete) A type of dance move or step.
  2. (dance, music, historical) Alternative form of branle (dance of French origin dating from the 16th century, performed by couples in a circle or a line; the music for this dance)

Notes

References


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