bass vs basso what difference

what is difference between bass and basso

English

Etymology 1

From Italian basso (low), from Latin bassus (low).

Alternative forms

  • (noun): base (dated)

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • enPR: bās, IPA(key): /beɪs/
  • Homophone: base

Adjective

bass (comparative more bass, superlative most bass)

  1. Of sound, a voice or an instrument, low in pitch or frequency.
    The giant spoke in a deep, bass, rumbling voice that shook me to my boots.
Translations

Noun

bass (plural basses)

  1. A low spectrum of sound tones.
    Peter adjusted the equalizer on his audio equipment to emphasize the bass.
  2. A section of musical group that produces low-pitched sound, lower than the baritone and tenor.
    The conductor preferred to situate the bass in the middle rear, rather than to one side of the orchestra.
  3. One who sings in the bass range.
    Halfway through middle school, Edgar morphed from a soprano to a bass, much to the amazement and amusement of his fellow choristers.
  4. (music) An instrument that plays in the bass range, in particular a double bass, bass guitar, electric bass or bass synthesiser.
    The musician swung the bass over his head like an axe and smashed it into the amplifier, creating a discordant howl of noise.
  5. The clef sign that indicates that the pitch of the notes is below middle C; a bass clef.
    The score had been written without the treble and bass, but it was easy to pick out which was which based on the location of the notes on the staff.
Synonyms
  • (singer): basso
  • (clef): F clef
Coordinate terms
  • (voice types): soprano, mezzo-soprano, contralto (female); countertenor, tenor, baritone, bass (male)
  • (music) SATB (Initialism of soprano, alto, tenor, bass.)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bass (third-person singular simple present basses, present participle bassing, simple past and past participle bassed)

  1. To sound in a deep tone.
    • 1623 [1610], William Shakespeare, The Tempest (First Folio ed.), act III, scene iii, lines 99-99
      [] and the Thunder
      (That deepe and dreadfull Organ-Pipe) pronounc’d
      The name of Proſper : it did baſe my Treſpaſſe
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bace, bas, alteration of bars, from Old English bærs (a fish, perch), from Proto-West Germanic *bars, from Proto-Germanic *barsaz (perch, literally prickly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰórsos (prickle, thorn, scale). Cognate with Dutch baars (perch, bass), German Barsch (perch). More at barse.

Alternative forms

  • basse (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băs, IPA(key): /bæs/

Noun

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses or bass)

  1. The perch; any of various marine and freshwater fish resembling the perch, all within the order of Perciformes.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

A corruption of bast.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băs, IPA(key): /bæs/

Noun

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses)

  1. The fibrous inner bark of the linden or lime tree, used for making mats.
  2. Fibers from other plants, especially palm trees
  3. Anything made from such fibers, such as a hassock, basket or thick mat.
Derived terms
  • basswood

See also

  • bass on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • BSAs, SABS, sabs

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German vaz, from Old High German faz, from Proto-Germanic *fatą (vessel, container). Cognate with German Fass, Dutch vat, English vat, Icelandic fat.

Noun

bass n (plural bèssardiminutive bèssle)

  1. (Sette Comuni) vat, tub

Declension

References

  • “bass” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

German

Etymology

Former comparative of wohl

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bas]

Adjective

bass (not comparable)

  1. greatly

Usage notes

This primarily used in the collocations bass erstaunt/basses Erstaunen.

Declension

Further reading

  • “bass” in Duden online

Latvian

Etymology

From Italian basso

Noun

bass m (1st declension)

  1. bass

Adjective

bass (definite basais, comparative basāks, superlative visbasākais, adverb basi)

  1. bare, unshod (of feet: without shoes, socks or other coverings)

Declension

Synonyms

  • kails

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus.

Adjective

bass

  1. low

Luxembourgish

Verb

bass

  1. second-person singular present indicative of sinn

Maltese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bas/

Etymology 1

Inherited from dialectal Arabic; compare Tunisian Arabic بص(baṣṣ, to fart).

Verb

bass (imperfect jboss)

  1. to fart
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • bassa

Etymology 2

From English bus.

Noun

bass m (plural basis)

  1. bus

Middle English

Adjective

bass

  1. Alternative form of bas

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso

Noun

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural basser, definite plural bassene)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived terms

  • kontrabass
  • snurrebass

References

  • “bass” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso

Noun

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural bassar, definite plural bassane)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived terms

  • kontrabass
  • snurrebass

References

  • “bass” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Vallader) bas

Etymology

From Late Latin bassus.

Adjective

bass m (f bassa, m pl bass, f pl bassas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) deep, low


English

Etymology

From Italian basso, from Latin bassus (short, low). Doublet of base and bass.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -æsəʊ

Noun

basso (plural bassos or bassi)

  1. (music) A bass singer, especially in opera.
  2. (music) An instrumental part written for a bass instrument.
  3. (music) The double bass, or contrabasso.

Related terms

  • basso continuo
  • basso profundo

References

Anagrams

  • ASBOs, Asbos, asbos, bosas, sabos

Finnish

Etymology

Borrowed from Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus (thick, low).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbɑsːo/, [ˈbɑs̠ːo̞]
  • Rhymes: -ɑsːo
  • Syllabification: bas‧so

Noun

basso

  1. (music) bass (voice; low spectrum of sound tones)
  2. (music) bass guitar

Declension

Derived terms

  • basisti

Italian

Etymology

From Late Latin bassus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbas.so/
  • Rhymes: -asso

Adjective

basso (feminine bassa, masculine plural bassi, feminine plural basse, superlative bassissimo)

  1. low
    Antonym: alto
  2. short (in height)
    Synonym: piccolo
    Antonym: alto
  3. narrow, thin
    Synonyms: sottile, stretto
  4. (of water) shallow
    Synonym: poco profondo
  5. (of light) faint
    Synonyms: debole, soffuso
  6. (of position) low, lower, lowered
  7. (figuratively) base
    Synonyms: vile, meschino

Adverb

basso

  1. low

Noun

basso m (plural bassi)

  1. bottom, lower part
  2. (music) bass (all senses); bass guitar
  3. (music) basso

Related terms

  • abbassare
  • abbasso
  • bassa
  • bassamente
  • bassezza
  • bassista
  • bassofondo
  • bassorilievo
  • bassotto
  • bassotuba
  • dabbasso
  • in basso
  • ribassare
  • sbassare

Latin

Adjective

bassō

  1. dative masculine singular of bassus
  2. dative neuter singular of bassus
  3. ablative masculine singular of bassus
  4. ablative neuter singular of bassus

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