bass vs deep what difference

what is difference between bass and deep

English

Etymology 1

From Italian basso (low), from Latin bassus (low).

Alternative forms

  • (noun): base (dated)

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪs
  • enPR: bās, IPA(key): /beɪs/
  • Homophone: base

Adjective

bass (comparative more bass, superlative most bass)

  1. Of sound, a voice or an instrument, low in pitch or frequency.
    The giant spoke in a deep, bass, rumbling voice that shook me to my boots.
Translations

Noun

bass (plural basses)

  1. A low spectrum of sound tones.
    Peter adjusted the equalizer on his audio equipment to emphasize the bass.
  2. A section of musical group that produces low-pitched sound, lower than the baritone and tenor.
    The conductor preferred to situate the bass in the middle rear, rather than to one side of the orchestra.
  3. One who sings in the bass range.
    Halfway through middle school, Edgar morphed from a soprano to a bass, much to the amazement and amusement of his fellow choristers.
  4. (music) An instrument that plays in the bass range, in particular a double bass, bass guitar, electric bass or bass synthesiser.
    The musician swung the bass over his head like an axe and smashed it into the amplifier, creating a discordant howl of noise.
  5. The clef sign that indicates that the pitch of the notes is below middle C; a bass clef.
    The score had been written without the treble and bass, but it was easy to pick out which was which based on the location of the notes on the staff.
Synonyms
  • (singer): basso
  • (clef): F clef
Coordinate terms
  • (voice types): soprano, mezzo-soprano, contralto (female); countertenor, tenor, baritone, bass (male)
  • (music) SATB (Initialism of soprano, alto, tenor, bass.)
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

bass (third-person singular simple present basses, present participle bassing, simple past and past participle bassed)

  1. To sound in a deep tone.
    • 1623 [1610], William Shakespeare, The Tempest (First Folio ed.), act III, scene iii, lines 99-99
      [] and the Thunder
      (That deepe and dreadfull Organ-Pipe) pronounc’d
      The name of Proſper : it did baſe my Treſpaſſe
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bace, bas, alteration of bars, from Old English bærs (a fish, perch), from Proto-West Germanic *bars, from Proto-Germanic *barsaz (perch, literally prickly), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰórsos (prickle, thorn, scale). Cognate with Dutch baars (perch, bass), German Barsch (perch). More at barse.

Alternative forms

  • basse (archaic)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băs, IPA(key): /bæs/

Noun

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses or bass)

  1. The perch; any of various marine and freshwater fish resembling the perch, all within the order of Perciformes.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

A corruption of bast.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: băs, IPA(key): /bæs/

Noun

bass (countable and uncountable, plural basses)

  1. The fibrous inner bark of the linden or lime tree, used for making mats.
  2. Fibers from other plants, especially palm trees
  3. Anything made from such fibers, such as a hassock, basket or thick mat.
Derived terms
  • basswood

See also

  • bass on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • BSAs, SABS, sabs

Cimbrian

Etymology

From Middle High German vaz, from Old High German faz, from Proto-Germanic *fatą (vessel, container). Cognate with German Fass, Dutch vat, English vat, Icelandic fat.

Noun

bass n (plural bèssardiminutive bèssle)

  1. (Sette Comuni) vat, tub

Declension

References

  • “bass” in Martalar, Umberto Martello; Bellotto, Alfonso (1974) Dizionario della lingua Cimbra dei Sette Communi vicentini, 1st edition, Roana, Italy: Instituto di Cultura Cimbra A. Dal Pozzo

German

Etymology

Former comparative of wohl

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [bas]

Adjective

bass (not comparable)

  1. greatly

Usage notes

This primarily used in the collocations bass erstaunt/basses Erstaunen.

Declension

Further reading

  • “bass” in Duden online

Latvian

Etymology

From Italian basso

Noun

bass m (1st declension)

  1. bass

Adjective

bass (definite basais, comparative basāks, superlative visbasākais, adverb basi)

  1. bare, unshod (of feet: without shoes, socks or other coverings)

Declension

Synonyms

  • kails

Lombard

Etymology

Akin to Italian basso, from Late Latin bassus.

Adjective

bass

  1. low

Luxembourgish

Verb

bass

  1. second-person singular present indicative of sinn

Maltese

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bas/

Etymology 1

Inherited from dialectal Arabic; compare Tunisian Arabic بص(baṣṣ, to fart).

Verb

bass (imperfect jboss)

  1. to fart
Conjugation
Derived terms
  • bassa

Etymology 2

From English bus.

Noun

bass m (plural basis)

  1. bus

Middle English

Adjective

bass

  1. Alternative form of bas

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso

Noun

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural basser, definite plural bassene)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived terms

  • kontrabass
  • snurrebass

References

  • “bass” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin bassus, via Italian basso

Noun

bass m (definite singular bassen, indefinite plural bassar, definite plural bassane)

  1. (music) bass; (musical range, person, instrument or group performing in the base range)
  2. (music) short for bassgitar (bass guitar) or kontrabass (double bass)

Derived terms

  • kontrabass
  • snurrebass

References

  • “bass” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Vallader) bas

Etymology

From Late Latin bassus.

Adjective

bass m (f bassa, m pl bass, f pl bassas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) deep, low


English

Etymology

From Middle English depe, deep, dep, deop, from Old English dēop (deep, profound; awful, mysterious; heinous; serious, solemn, earnest; extreme, great), from Proto-Germanic *deupaz (deep), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰewbʰ-nós, from *dʰewb- (deep). Cognate with Scots depe (deep), Saterland Frisian djoop (deep), West Frisian djip (deep), Low German deep (deep), Dutch diep (deep), German tief (deep), Danish dyb (deep), Norwegian Bokmål dyp (deep), Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish djup (deep), Icelandic djúpur (deep), Lithuanian dubùs (deep, hollow), Albanian det (sea), Welsh dwfn (deep).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: dēp, IPA(key): /diːp/
  • Rhymes: -iːp

Adjective

deep (comparative deeper, superlative deepest)

  1. (of distance or position; also figurative) Extending far away from a point of reference, especially downwards.
    1. Extending far down from the top, or surface, to the bottom, literally or figuratively.
      • 2013 September 28, Kenan Malik, “London Is Special, but Not That Special,” New York Times (retrieved 28 September 2013):
        While Britain’s recession has been deep and unforgiving, in London it has been relatively shallow.
    2. Far in extent in another (non-downwards, but generally also non-upwards) direction away from a point of reference.
    3. (in combination) Extending to a level or length equivalent to the stated thing.
    4. In a (specified) number of rows or layers.
    5. Thick.
    6. Voluminous.
      • Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes. [] She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, drawing a deep breath which caused the round of her bosom to lift the lace at her throat.
    7. Positioned or reaching far, especially down through something or into something.
      1. (cricket, baseball, softball) Far from the center of the playing area, near to the boundary of the playing area, either in absolute terms or relative to a point of reference.
      2. (sports such as soccer, tennis) Penetrating a long way, especially a long way forward.
      3. (sports such as soccer, American football, tennis) Positioned back, or downfield, towards one’s own goal, or towards or behind one’s baseline or similar reference point.
  2. (intellectual, social) Complex, involved.
    1. Profound, having great meaning or import, but possibly obscure or not obvious.
    2. Significant, not superficial, in extent.
    3. Hard to penetrate or comprehend; profound; intricate; obscure.
      • c. 1840, Thomas De Quincey:
        Why it was that the ancients had no landscape painting, is a question deep almost as the mystery of life, and harder of solution than all the problems of jurisprudence combined.
    4. Of penetrating or far-reaching intellect; not superficial; thoroughly skilled; sagacious; cunning.
  3. (sound, voice) Low in pitch.
  4. (of a color or flavour) Highly saturated; rich.
  5. (sleep) Sound, heavy (describing a state of sleep from which one is not easily awoken).
  6. Muddy; boggy; sandy; said of roads.
    • The ways in that vale were very deep.
  7. (of time) Distant in the past, ancient.

Synonyms

  • (of a hole, water, etc):
  • (having great meaning): heavy, meaningful, profound
  • (thick in a vertical direction): thick
  • (voluminous): great, large, voluminous
  • (low in pitch): low, low-pitched
  • (of a color, dark and highly saturated): bright, rich, vivid
  • (of sleep): fast, heavy

Antonyms

  • (of a hole, water, etc): shallow
  • (having great meaning): frivolous, light, shallow, superficial
  • (in extent in a direction away from the observer): shallow
  • (thick in a vertical direction): shallow, thin
  • (voluminous): shallow, small
  • (low in pitch): high, high-pitched, piping
  • (of a color, dark and highly saturated): light, pale, desaturated, washed-out
  • (of sleep): light

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Translations

See also

References

  • Deep on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Adverb

deep (comparative more deep or deeper, superlative most deep or deepest)

  1. Far, especially far down through something or into something, physically or figuratively.
    The ogre lived in a cave deep underground.
    We ventured deep into the forest.
    His problems lie deep in the subconscious.
    I am deep in debt.
  2. (also deeply) In a profound, not superficial, manner.
    I thought long and deep.
  3. (also deeply) In large volume.
    breathe deep, drink deep
  4. (sports) Back towards one’s own goal, baseline, or similar.
    He’s normally a midfield player, but today he’s playing deep.

Translations

Noun

deep (countable and uncountable, plural deeps)

  1. (literary, with “the”) The deep part of a lake, sea, etc.
    creatures of the deep
  2. (literary, with “the”) A silent time; quiet isolation.
    the deep of night
  3. (rare) A deep shade of colour.
  4. (US, rare) The profound part of a problem.
  5. (with “the”) The sea, the ocean.
  6. (cricket) A fielding position near the boundary.
    Russell is a safe pair of hands in the deep.

Translations

Derived terms

Related terms

See also

  • deeps

Anagrams

  • Peed, peed

Central Franconian

Alternative forms

  • deef (northern Moselle Franconian; now predominant in Ripuarian)
  • dief (southern Moselle Franconian)

Etymology

One of several Ripuarian relict words with an unshifted post-vocalic plosive. Compare Aap (ape), söke (to seek).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /deːp/

Adjective

deep (masculine deepe, feminine deep, comparativer deeper, superlative et deepste)

  1. (Ripuarian, archaic in many dialects) deep

Middle English

Adjective

deep

  1. Alternative form of depe

Adverb

deep

  1. Alternative form of depe

Plautdietsch

Etymology

From Middle Low German diep, from Old Saxon diop.

Adjective

deep

  1. deep, profound

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