basswood vs lime what difference

what is difference between basswood and lime

English

Etymology

bass +‎ wood

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbæswʊd/

Noun

basswood (plural basswoods)

  1. (US) Any of several trees of the genus Tilia; the lindens, especially Tilia americana, the American basswood.

Translations

Anagrams

  • Swobodas


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laɪm/
  • Rhymes: -aɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English lyme, lym, lime, from Old English līm, from Proto-Germanic *līmaz. Cognate with Saterland Frisian Liem (glue), Dutch lijm, German Leim (glue), Danish lim (from Old Norse lím), Latin limus (mud).

Noun

lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. (chemistry) Any inorganic material containing calcium, usually calcium oxide (quicklime) or calcium hydroxide (slaked lime).
    • 1952, L.F. Salzman, Building in England, page 149.
      Lime, which is the product of the burning of chalk or limestone, might be bought ready burnt, or it could be burnt in kilns specially constructed in the neighbourhood of the building operations.
  2. (poetic) Any gluey or adhesive substance; something which traps or captures someone; sometimes a synonym for birdlime.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by William Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      Monster, come, put some lime upon your fingers, and away with the rest.
    • 1835, William Wordsworth, They called Thee Merry England, in old time [first line of unnamed poem]
      Like the lime which foolish birds are caught with.
Derived terms
Translations
See also

Verb

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (transitive) To treat with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide (lime).
    • 1917, Rudyard Kipling, The Land
      If I were you, I’d lime.
  2. (transitive) To smear with birdlime.
    1. (rare) To ensnare, catch, entrap.
      • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 3 Scene 1
        URSULA. She’s lim’d, I warrant you: we have caught her, madam.
        HERO. If it prove so, then loving goes by haps:
        Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
  3. (transitive) To apply limewash.
Translations

Etymology 2

An alteration of line, a variant form of lind.

Noun

lime (countable and uncountable, plural limes)

  1. A deciduous tree of the genus Tilia, especially Tilia × europaea; the linden tree.
  2. The wood of this tree.
Usage notes

Both this and the citrus are trees with fragrant flowers, but this is more temperate and the citrus is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, the citrus sense is much more common

Derived terms
  • American lime (Tilia americana)
  • broad-leaved lime (Tilia platyphyllos)
  • brooklime (Veronica spp.)
  • lime tree looper (Erannis tiliaria)
  • silver lime (Tilia tomentosa)
Related terms
  • linden
Translations

Etymology 3

From French lime, from Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة(līma), from Persian لیمو(līmū).

Noun

lime (plural limes)

  1. Any of several green citrus fruit, somewhat smaller and sharper-tasting than a lemon.
  2. Any of the trees that bear limes, especially Key lime, Citrus aurantiifolia.
  3. A brilliant, sometimes yellowish, green colour associated with the fruits of a lime tree.
  4. (fandom slang) A fan fiction story which contains sexual references, but stops short of full, explicit descriptions of sexual activity (coined by analogy with lemon).
Usage notes

Both this and the linden are trees with fragrant flowers, but the linden is more temperate and this is more tropical and subtropical. Outside of Europe and adjoining parts of Asia, this sense is much more common.

Derived terms
Translations
See also

Adjective

lime (not comparable)

  1. Containing lime or lime juice.
  2. Having the aroma or flavor of lime.
  3. Lime-green.
Translations

Etymology 4

Back-formation from limer.

Verb

lime (third-person singular simple present limes, present participle liming, simple past and past participle limed)

  1. (Caribbean, Trinidad & Tobago) To hang out/socialize in an informal, relaxed environment, especially with friends, for example at a party or on the beach.

Etymology 5

Noun

lime (plural limes)

  1. Alternative form of lyam (a leash)
Derived terms
  • limehound

Anagrams

  • Elim, Elmi, Emil, Imel, Lemi, Liem, Meli, elim, mile

Danish

Noun

lime c (singular definite limen, plural indefinite lime or limes)

  1. lime (fruit)

Inflection

Verb

lime (imperative lim, infinitive at lime, present tense limer, past tense limede, perfect tense har limet)

  1. to glue

Fataluku

Numeral

lime

  1. five

Finnish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/, [ˈlime̞]
  • Rhymes: -ime
  • Syllabification: li‧me

Noun

lime

  1. lime (citrus tree and its fruit)

Usage notes

This word is now more common than limetti but still regarded as less correct by, for example, the Kielitoimiston sanakirja. Some inflected forms are indeed quite awkward to use.

Declension

Synonyms

  • limetti

Anagrams

  • Lemi, ilme, miel.

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lim/
  • Rhymes: -im

Etymology 1

From Latin līma.

Noun

lime f (plural limes)

  1. file (tool)
Derived terms
  • lime à ongles
  • limer

Etymology 2

From Spanish lima, from Arabic لِيمَة(līma).

Noun

lime f (plural limes)

  1. lime (fruit, tree)
Synonyms
  • (fruit): limette

Anagrams

  • miel, mile

Further reading

  • “lime” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Verb

lime

  1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive of limar

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈli.me/

Etymology 1

Noun

lime f pl

  1. plural of lima

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English.

Noun

lime m (invariable)

  1. lime (citrus tree)

Anagrams

  • elmi, meli

Jamaican Creole

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlaɪm/
  • Hyphenation: lime

Noun

lime (plural: lime dem, quantified: lime)

  1. lime (small green citrus fruit)
  2. hangout, get-together (social gathering)

Verb

lime

  1. hang out
  2. dawdle, idle

Further reading

  • Richard Allsopp (main editor), Dictionary of Caribbean English Usage, 2003 (reprint by The University of the West Indies Press, originally 1996 by Oxford University Press), ISBN 9789766401450 (originally ISBN-10: 976-640-145-4), page 348

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈliː.me/, [ˈlʲiːmɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈli.me/, [ˈliːmɛ]

Noun

līme

  1. vocative singular of līmus

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English lim.

Noun

lime

  1. Alternative form of lyme (limb)

Etymology 2

From Old English līm.

Noun

lime

  1. Alternative form of lyme (quicklime)

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Persian لیمو(līmū), via Arabic لِيمَة(līma), Spanish lima, and English lime

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /laɪm/

Noun

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limer, definite plural limene)

  1. a lime (citrus fruit)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse líma

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /liːmə/

Verb

lime (imperative lim, present tense limer, passive limes, simple past lima or limet or limte, past participle lima or limet or limt, present participle limende)

  1. to glue or paste (something)
Related terms
  • lim (noun)

References

  • “lime” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From Old Norse líma.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːmə/ (example of pronunciation)

Verb

lime (present tense limer, past tense limde/limte, past participle limt, passive infinitive limast, present participle limande, imperative lim)

  1. (transitive) to glue
Alternative forms
  • lima (a-infinitive)
Derived terms
  • liming f
Related terms
  • lim n

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English lime. From Persian لیمو(līmū), via Arabic لِيمَة(līma).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lɑɪ̯m/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. (citrus fruit) a lime
  2. (usually uncountable) lime juice
Synonyms
  • (citrus fruit): limett
Derived terms
  • limejuice

Etymology 3

From Old Norse lími.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²liːmə/ (example of pronunciation)

Noun

lime m (definite singular limen, indefinite plural limar, definite plural limane)

  1. a besom, broom
Derived terms
  • sopelime m

References

  • “lime” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • meil, mile

Portuguese

Verb

lime

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of limar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of limar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of limar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of limar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlime/, [ˈli.me]

Verb

lime

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of limar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of limar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of limar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of limar.

Yakan

Numeral

lime

  1. five

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