bastard vs prick what difference

what is difference between bastard and prick

English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈbɑːs.təd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈbæs.tɚd/

Etymology

From Middle English bastard, bastarde, from Anglo-Norman bastard (illegitimate child), from Frankish *bāst (marriage) (probably via Medieval Latin bastardus; compare Middle Dutch bast (lust, heat)) and derogatory suffix -ard (pejorative agent noun suffix), from Proto-Germanic *banstuz (bond, tie) (compare West Frisian boask, boaste (marriage)), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰendʰ- (to tie, bind); or equivalent to bast +‎ -ard. Cognate with French bâtard (bastard), West Frisian bastert (bastard), Dutch bastaard (bastard), German Bastard (bastard), Icelandic bastarður (bastard). Probably originally referred to a child from a polygynous marriage of heathen Germanic custom — a practice not sanctioned by the Christian churches. Related to boose.

Alternatively, the Old French form may originate from the term fils de bast (packsaddle son), meaning a child conceived on an improvised bed (medieval saddles often doubled as beds while traveling).

Noun

bastard (plural bastards)

  1. A person who was born out of wedlock, and hence often considered an illegitimate descendant.
    Synonyms: love-child, born in the vestry, illegitimate; see also Thesaurus:bastard
    • 1965, The Big Valley
      Jarrod: Who are you?
      Heath: Your father’s bastard son.
  2. A mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties).
  3. (vulgar or derogatory, typically referring to a man) A contemptible, inconsiderate, overly or arrogantly rude or spiteful person.
    Synonyms: son of a bitch, arsehole, asshole; see also Thesaurus:git, Thesaurus:jerk
    • 1997, South Park television program
      “Oh my God, they killed Kenny!” “You bastards!”
  4. (often humorous) A man, a fellow, a male friend.
  5. (often preceded by ‘poor’) A person deserving of pity.
  6. (informal) A child who does not know his or her father.
  7. (informal) Something extremely difficult or unpleasant to deal with.
  8. A variation that is not genuine; something irregular or inferior or of dubious origin, fake or counterfeit.
    • 1622, Francis Bacon, Bacon’s History of the Reign of King Henry VII, Cambridge University Press (1902), page 62:
      There were also made good and politic laws that parliament, against usury, which is the bastard use of money…
  9. An intermediate-grade file; also bastard file.
  10. A sweet wine.
  11. A sword that is midway in length between a short-sword and a long sword; also bastard sword.
  12. An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from syrups that have been boiled several times.
  13. A large mould for straining sugar.
  14. A writing paper of a particular size.
  15. (Britain, politics, derogatory) A Eurosceptic Conservative MP, especially in the government of John Major.
    • 2000, Peter Hobday, Managing the message, Allison & Busby
      If you are a politician, you make sure that you know all such references in case an interviewer suddenly asks, ‘Are you one of the bastards in Mr Major’s cabinet?’
    • 2011, Duncan Hall, A2 Government and Politics: Ideologies and Ideologies in Action, Lulu.com →ISBN, page 62
      While John Major managed to get the Maastricht Treaty through parliament, despite the efforts of the “bastards” in his cabinet, the 2001 Conservative General Election campaign was fought on entirely eurosceptic lines.
    • 2014, Melvin J. Lasky, Profanity, Obscenity and the Media, Transaction Publishers →ISBN
      One “bastard,” the Minister for Wales, John Redwood (who mounted an unsuccessful campaign to displace the Tory chief, John Major), was removed in a Cabinet reshuffle; but was his young successor William Hague any more reliable?

Usage notes

  • (one born to unmarried parents): Not always regarded as a stigma (though it is one in e.g. canon law, prohibitive for clerical office without papal indult): Norman duke William, the Conqueror of England, is referred to in state documents as “William the Bastard”; a Burgundian prince was even officially styled Great Bastard of Burgundy.

Antonyms

  • legitimate

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

bastard (comparative more bastard, superlative most bastard)

  1. Of or like a bastard (illegitimate human descendant).
  2. Of or like a bastard (bad person).
  3. Of or like a mongrel, bastardized creature/cross.
  4. Of abnormal, irregular or otherwise inferior qualities (size, shape etc).
  5. Spurious, lacking authenticity: counterfeit, fake.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Self-conceit (sermon)
      that bastard self-love which is so vicious in itself, and productive of so many vices
  6. (Should we delete(+) this sense?) (of a language) imperfect; not spoken or written well or in the classical style; broken.
  7. Used in the vernacular name of a species to indicate that it is similar in some way to another species, often (but not always) one of another genus.
  8. (Britain, vulgar) Very unpleasant.
  9. (printing) Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.
  10. (theater lighting) Consisting of one predominant color blended with small amounts of complementary color; used to replicate natural light because of their warmer appearance.

Translations

Interjection

bastard!

  1. (rare) Exclamation of strong dismay or strong sense of being upset.
    • 2001, Stephen King, “The Death of Jack Hamilton”, in Everything’s Eventual, Simon and Schuster (2007), →ISBN, page 90:
      Jack says, “Oh! Bastard! I’m hit!” That bullet had to have come in the busted back window and how it missed Johnnie to hit Jack I don’t know.
    • 2004, Cecelia Ahern, PS, I Love You (novel), Hyperion, →ISBN, page 7:
      “Yes, I’m hhhhowwwwwwcch!” she yelped as she stubbed her toe against the bedpost. “Shit, shit, fuck, bastard, shit, crap!”
    • 2006, Emily Franklin, Love from London, Penguin, →ISBN, page 212:
      “Isn’t she lovely?” Clem asks, hopefully rhetorically. “Oh, bastard. I’ve got to go—that’s my signal. []

Translations

Verb

bastard (third-person singular simple present bastards, present participle bastarding, simple past and past participle bastarded)

  1. (obsolete) To bastardize.
    • After her husband’s death she was matter of tragedy , having lived to see her brother beheaded , and her two sons deposed from the crown , bastarded in their blood

Further reading

  • bastard at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • “bastard” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.
  • “mongrel” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

Anagrams

  • Barstad, batards, tabards

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈbastart]
  • Hyphenation: ba‧s‧tard

Noun

bastard m anim

  1. bastard, love child (person born to unmarried parents)
    Synonym: levoboček
  2. bastard, mongrel (biological cross between different breeds, groups or varieties)
  3. bastard, asshole

Declension

Further reading

  • bastard in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • bastard in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology

From Old French bastard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /bastard/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀd̥]
  • IPA(key): /bastar/, [b̥aˈsd̥ɑːˀ]

Noun

bastard c (singular definite bastarden, plural indefinite bastarder)

  1. crossbreed (an organism produced by mating of individuals of different varieties or breeds)
    Synonyms: hybrid, krydsning
  2. mongrel (someone of mixed kind or uncertain origin, especially a dog)
  3. (dated) bastard (person who was born out of wedlock)

Inflection


Irish

Alternative forms

  • bastairt, bastart

Etymology

Borrowed from Middle English bastard, from Old French bastard.

Noun

bastard m (genitive singular bastaird, nominative plural bastaird)

  1. bastard

Declension

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • “bastard” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “bastard”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “bastard” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “bastard” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • bastarde, basterd, bastart

Etymology

From Anglo-Norman bastard; equivalent to bast (illegitimacy) +‎ -ard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbastard/, /ˈbastaːrd/, /ˈbastərd/

Noun

bastard (plural bastardes)

  1. an illegitimate child, especially a noble one; a bastard
  2. a kind of fortified wine, often with spices added
  3. (rare) a heretic or sinner; one separated from one’s deity
  4. (rare) a dog that isn’t purebred; a mutt or mongrel
  5. (rare) a botanical tendril or offshoot

Derived terms

  • bastardie

Descendants

  • English: bastard
  • Scots: bastart, bastert

References

  • “bastā̆rd, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-03.

Adjective

bastard

  1. coming not from wedlock, coming from bastardy; illegitimate
  2. low-quality, inferior, imitation; of bad manufacture
  3. (rare) not purebred; of mixed lineage
  4. (rare) made using or incorporating fortified wine
  5. (rare) wrong, erroneous, incorrect

Descendants

  • English: bastard
  • Scots: bastart, bastert

References

  • “bastā̆rd, n. as adj.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-03-03.

Middle French

Alternative forms

  • bastart

Etymology

From Old French bastard, from Late Latin bastardus.

Noun

bastard m (plural bastars, feminine singular bastarde, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard (child born outside of wedlock)

Adjective

bastard m (feminine singular bastarde, masculine plural bastars, feminine plural bastardes)

  1. bastard

Descendants

  • French: bâtard

Old French

Etymology

From Late Latin bastardus, of Germanic origin, possibly Frankish.

Noun

bastard m (oblique plural bastarz or bastartz, nominative singular bastarz or bastartz, nominative plural bastard)

  1. bastard (person conceived to unmarried parents)
  2. (derogatory, usually vocative) bastard (insult)

Adjective

bastard m (oblique and nominative feminine singular bastarde)

  1. bastard (conceived by unmarried parents)

Declension

Descendants

  • French: bâtard
  • Galician: bastardo
  • Middle Dutch: bastaert
    • Dutch: bastaard
      • Indonesian: bastar
  • Middle English: bastard, bastarde, basterd, bastart
    • English: bastard
    • Scots: bastart, bastert

Romanian

Etymology

From Italian bastardo.

Noun

bastard m (plural bastarzi)

  1. bastard

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹɪk/, [pʰɹ̠̊ɪk]
  • Rhymes: -ɪk

Etymology 1

From Middle English prik, prikke, from Old English prica, pricu (a sharp point, minute mark, spot, dot, small portion, prick), from Proto-Germanic *prikô, *prikō (a prick, point), of uncertain origin, perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *breyǵ- (to scrape, scratch, rub, prickle, chap). Cognate with West Frisian prik (small hole), Dutch prik (point, small stick), Danish prik (dot), Icelandic prik (dot, small stick). Pejorative context came from prickers, or witch-hunters.

Noun

prick (plural pricks)

  1. A small hole or perforation, caused by piercing. [from 10th c.]
  2. An indentation or small mark made with a pointed object. [from 10th c.]
  3. (obsolete) A dot or other diacritical mark used in writing; a point. [10th-18th c.]
  4. (obsolete) A tiny particle; a small amount of something; a jot. [10th-18th c.]
  5. A small pointed object. [from 10th c.]
  6. The experience or feeling of being pierced or punctured by a small, sharp object. [from 13th c.]
  7. A feeling of remorse.
    • 1768–1777, Abraham Tucker, The Light of Nature Pursued
      the pricks of conscience
  8. (slang, vulgar) The penis. [from 16th c.]
  9. (Britain, Australia, US, slang, derogatory) Someone (especially a man or boy) who is unpleasant, rude or annoying. [from 16th c.]
  10. (now historical) A small roll of yarn or tobacco. [from 17th c.]
  11. The footprint of a hare.
  12. (obsolete) A point or mark on the dial, noting the hour.
  13. (obsolete) The point on a target at which an archer aims; the mark; the pin.
    • 1579, Edmund Spenser, The Shepheardes Calender, “September”
      they that shooten nearest the prick
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English prikken, from Old English prician, priccan (to prick), from Proto-Germanic *prikōną, *prikjaną (to pierce, prick), of uncertain origin; perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *breyǵ- (to scrape, scratch, rub, prickle, chap). Cognate with dialectal English pritch, Dutch prikken (to prick, sting), Middle High German pfrecken (to prick), Swedish pricka (to dot, prick), and possibly to Lithuanian įbrėžti (to scrape, scratch, carve, inscribe, strike).

Verb

prick (third-person singular simple present pricks, present participle pricking, simple past and past participle pricked)

  1. (transitive) To pierce or puncture slightly. [from 11th c.]
    1. (farriery) To drive a nail into (a horse’s foot), so as to cause lameness.
    2. (transitive, hunting) To shoot without killing.
      • 1871, Robert Smith Surtees, Jorrocks’s jaunts and jollities (page 48)
        They had shot at old Tom, the hare, too, but he is still alive; at least I pricked him yesterday morn across the path into the turnip field.
  2. (transitive) To form by piercing or puncturing.
  3. (obsolete) To mark or denote by a puncture; to designate by pricking; to choose; to mark.
    • c. 1620, Francis Bacon, letter of advice to Sir George Villiers
      Some who are pricked for sheriffs.
  4. (transitive, chiefly nautical) To mark the surface of (something) with pricks or dots; especially, to trace a ship’s course on (a chart). [from 16th c.]
  5. (nautical, obsolete) To run a middle seam through the cloth of a sail.
  6. To fix by the point; to attach or hang by puncturing.
    • 1615, George Sandys, The Relation of a Journey begun an. Dom. 1610, in four books
      The cooks […]prick it [a slice] on a prog of iron.
  7. (intransitive, dated) To be punctured; to suffer or feel a sharp pain, as by puncture.
    • 17th century (probably 1606), William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act IV, scene 1:
      By the pricking of my thumbs, / Something wicked this way comes.
  8. (transitive, intransitive) To make or become sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; said especially of the ears of an animal, such as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up.
    • The courser […] pricks up his ears.
  9. (horticulture) Usually in the form prick out: to plant (seeds or seedlings) in holes made in soil at regular intervals.
  10. (transitive) To incite, stimulate, goad. [from 13th c.]
  11. (intransitive, archaic) To urge one’s horse on; to ride quickly. [from 14th c.]
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      At last, as through an open plaine they yode,
      They spide a knight that towards them pricked fayre […].
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book II, lines 527 to 538.
    • 1881, Robert Louis Stevenson, Virginibus Puerisque:
      Indeed, it is a memorable subject for consideration, with what unconcern and gaiety mankind pricks on along the Valley of the Shadow of Death.
  12. To affect with sharp pain; to sting, as with remorse.
    • Now when they heard this, they were pricked in their heart.
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Geraint and Enid
      I was pricked with some reproof.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      Three days remained till Beltane’s E’en, and throughout this time it was noted that Heriotside behaved like one possessed. It may be that his conscience pricked him, or that he had a glimpse of his sin and its coming punishment.
  13. (transitive) To make acidic or pungent.
  14. (intransitive) To become sharp or acid; to turn sour, as wine.
  15. To aim at a point or mark.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hawkins to this entry?)
  16. (obsolete, usually as prick up) to dress or adorn; to prink.
Translations

Swedish

Pronunciation

Adverb

prick

  1. exactly, sharp, on the spot

Noun

prick c

  1. a dot, small spot
  2. a remark, a stain (in a record of good behaviour)
  3. a guy, person; especially about a particularly nice or funny one
  4. a floating seamark in the form of a painted pole, possibly with cones, lights and reflectors

Usage notes

(guy, person): Mainly used in conjunction with the adjectives rolig (funny) or trevlig (nice), but also ruskig (eerie, scary).

Declension

Related terms

  • pricka
  • prickig

Derived terms

References

  • prick in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)

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