baste vs batter what difference

what is difference between baste and batter

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /beɪst/
  • Rhymes: -eɪst
  • Homophone: based

Etymology 1

Late Middle English, from Old French bastir (build, construct, sew up (a garment)).

Verb

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sew with long or loose stitches, as for temporary use, or in preparation for gathering the fabric.
Translations

Etymology 2

Middle English basten, of uncertain etymon, possibly from Old French basser (moisten, soak), from bacin (basin).

Verb

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. To sprinkle flour and salt and drip butter or fat on, as on meat in roasting.
  2. (by extension) To coat over something.
  3. To mark (sheep, etc.) with tar.
Translations

Noun

baste (plural bastes)

  1. A basting; a sprinkling of drippings etc. in cooking.
    • 1876, The Odd Fellow’s Companion
      “Just like a leg of mutton being roasted before a slow fire without any one to give it a baste,” groaned the old man.

Etymology 3

Perhaps from the cookery sense of baste or from some Scandinavian etymon. Compare Old Norse beysta (to beat, thresh) (whence
Danish børste (to beat up)). Compare also
Swedish basa (to beat with a rod, to flog) and
Swedish bösta (to thump).
Might be related French bâton (formerly baston), which means stick (English baton comes from bâton) ; see also French bastonnade, the act of beating with a stick.

Verb

baste (third-person singular simple present bastes, present participle basting, simple past and past participle basted)

  1. (archaic, slang) To beat with a stick; to cudgel.
    • July 1660, Samuel Pepys, Diaries
      One man was basted by the keeper for carrying some people over on his back through the waters.
Translations
References
  • [Francis] Grose [et al.] (1811), “Baste”, in Lexicon Balatronicum. A Dictionary of Buckish Slang, University Wit, and Pickpocket Eloquence. [], London: Printed for C. Chappell, [], OCLC 23927885.

Anagrams

  • Bates, Beast, Sebat, abets, bates, beast, beats, besat, betas, esbat, tabes

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

baste

  1. singular past indicative and subjunctive of bassen

Anagrams

  • batse, besta

French

Pronunciation

Noun

baste m (plural bastes)

  1. ace of clubs

Noun

baste f (plural bastes)

  1. basque (clothing)

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English bæst.

Noun

baste

  1. Alternative form of bast (bast)

Etymology 2

From Old French bast.

Noun

baste

  1. Alternative form of base (illegitimacy)

Northern Sami

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • (Kautokeino) IPA(key): /ˈpasːte/

Noun

baste

  1. spoon

Inflection

Derived terms

  • deadjabaste

Further reading

  • Koponen, Eino; Ruppel, Klaas; Aapala, Kirsti, editors (2002-2008) Álgu database: Etymological database of the Saami languages[3], Helsinki: Research Institute for the Languages of Finland

Portuguese

Verb

baste

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of bastar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of bastar
  3. third-person singular imperative of bastar

Spanish

Verb

baste

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of bastar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of bastar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of bastar.


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbætə(ɹ)/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈbætəɹ/, [ˈbæɾɚ]
  • Rhymes: -ætə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: badder (in accents with flapping)

Etymology 1

From Middle English bateren, from Old French batre (to beat).

Verb

batter (third-person singular simple present batters, present participle battering, simple past and past participle battered)

  1. To hit or strike violently and repeatedly.
  2. (cooking) To coat with batter (the food ingredient).
  3. (figuratively) To defeat soundly; to thrash.
    Synonym: thrash
    • 2018 June 24, Sam Wallace, “Harry Kane scores hat-trick as England hit Panama for six to secure World Cup knock-out qualification,” Telegraph (UK) (retrieved 24 June 2018):
      There have been so many times when England were such a tactically flat, stressed-out bunch that they could squeeze the joy out of battering even the meekest opposition, so at times against Panama you had to rub your eyes at the general levels of fun being had.
  4. (Britain, slang, usually in the passive) To intoxicate.
    Synonym: intoxicate
  5. (metalworking) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.
Derived terms
  • battered person syndrome
  • battered woman syndrome
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English bature, from Old French bateure (the action of beating), from batre (to beat).

Noun

batter (countable and uncountable, plural batters)

  1. (cooking, countable, uncountable) A beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (e.g. pancakes, cake, or Yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (e.g. fish) prior to frying
  2. (countable, slang) A binge, a heavy drinking session.
    Synonyms: bender, binge
  3. A paste of clay or loam.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Holland to this entry?)
  4. (countable, printing) A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.
    • 1881, The Printing Times and Lithographer (page 251)
      In repairing batters at the edges of the plate, when the bevel has been torn away by the catches, &c., it is necessary to solder a piece of metal along the side.
Translations

Etymology 3

Unknown.

Verb

batter (third-person singular simple present batters, present participle battering, simple past and past participle battered)

  1. (architecture) To slope (of walls, buildings etc.).

Noun

batter (plural batters)

  1. An incline on the outer face of a built wall.
Translations

Etymology 4

bat +‎ -er (agent suffix).

Noun

batter (plural batters)

  1. (baseball) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat.
    Synonyms: hitter, batsman (rare)
  2. (cricket, rare) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat; a batsman.
    Synonym: batsman
    Hyponyms: batswoman, batsman
    Hypernym: cricketer
    • 2015, Brendon McCullum, ESPNcricnfo

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Tarbet, tabret

Dutch

Verb

batter

  1. first-person singular present indicative of batteren
  2. imperative of batteren

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ba.te/

Verb

batter

  1. (sports) To bat.

Conjugation


Italian

Verb

batter

  1. Apocopic form of battere

Derived terms

  • in un batter d’occhio

Luxembourgish

Etymology

From Old High German bittar, from Proto-West Germanic *bit(t)r, from Proto-Germanic *bitraz. Cognate with German bitter, English bitter, Dutch bitter, Icelandic bitur.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈbater/, [ˈbɑ.tɐ]

Adjective

batter (masculine batteren, neuter battert, comparative méi batter, superlative am battersten)

  1. bitter

Declension

See also

  • (tastes) Geschmaach; batter, salzeg, sauer, séiss (Category: lb:Taste)

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Sutsilvan) batar

Etymology

From Late Latin battere, present active infinitive of battō, alternative form of Latin battuō (beat, pound; fight).

Verb

batter

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun) To beat.

Derived terms

  • batta-ovs
  • battasenda

Scots

Noun

batter (uncountable)

  1. A batter.
  2. A glue; paste.

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