bastinado vs falanga what difference

what is difference between bastinado and falanga

English

Alternative forms

  • bastinade
  • bastonade

Etymology

From Spanish bastonada (confer French bastonnade), from baston (a stick or staff).

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑːdəʊ

Noun

bastinado (plural bastinadoes)

  1. A blow with a stick or cudgel.
  2. Beating the bare soles of the feet with a stick: a form of corporal punishment used primarily within prisons in various countries. The receiving person is required to be barefoot.

Verb

bastinado (third-person singular simple present bastinadoes, present participle bastinadoing, simple past and past participle bastinadoed)

  1. (transitive) To punish a person by beating the bare soles of the feet, using a stick or truncheon.

References

  • bastinado in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.


Latin

Noun

falanga f (genitive falangae); first declension

  1. Alternative form of phalanga

Declension

First-declension noun.

References

  • falanga in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Polish

Etymology

From Latin phalanga, from Ancient Greek φάλαγξ, φᾰ́λᾰγγᾰ (phálanx, phálanga).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /faˈlan.ɡa/

Noun

falanga f

  1. phalanx

Declension

Further reading

  • falanga in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • falanga in Polish dictionaries at PWN

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