baton vs wand what difference

what is difference between baton and wand

English

Alternative forms

  • bâton

Etymology

From French bâton. Doublet of baston.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: bătʹŏn, IPA(key): /ˈbætɒn/
  • (US) enPR: bətänʹ, IPA(key): /bəˈtɑn/

Noun

baton (plural batons)

  1. A staff or truncheon, used for various purposes
  2. (music) The stick of a conductor in musical performances.
  3. (sports) An object transferred by runners in a relay race.
  4. (US) A short stout club used primarily by policemen; a truncheon (UK).
    Synonyms: billy club, nightstick
  5. (heraldry) An abatement in coats of arms to denote illegitimacy. (Also spelled batune, baston).
  6. (heraldry) A riband with the ends cut off, resembling a baton, as shown on a coat of arms.
  7. A short vertical lightweight post, not set into the ground, used to separate wires in a fence.

Derived terms

  • batonic
  • baton charge

Translations

Verb

baton (third-person singular simple present batons, present participle batoning, simple past and past participle batoned)

  1. To strike with a baton.

Translations

References

  • The Manual of Heraldry, Fifth Edition, by Anonymous, London, 1862, online at [1]
  • The Observer’s Book of Heraldry, by Charles Mackinnon of Dunakin, page 58.

Further reading

  • baton on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Baton in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • Botan, tabon

Crimean Tatar

Etymology

From French bâton.

Noun

baton

  1. bread stick
  2. chocolate stick

Declension

References

  • Mirjejev, V. A.; Usejinov, S. M. (2002) Ukrajinsʹko-krymsʹkotatarsʹkyj slovnyk [Ukrainian – Crimean Tatar Dictionary]‎[2], Simferopol: Dolya, →ISBN

Esperanto

Noun

baton

  1. accusative singular of bato

Haitian Creole

Etymology

From French bâton.

Noun

baton

  1. stick

Hiligaynon

Verb

báton

  1. accept, get, receive

Japanese

Romanization

baton

  1. Rōmaji transcription of バトン

Louisiana Creole French

Alternative forms

  • matan
  • batan

Etymology

From French bâton (stick).

Noun

baton

  1. stick
  2. stalk
  3. rod, pole
  4. cane, walking stick

References

  • Albert Valdman; Thomas A. Klinger; Margaret M. Marshall; Kevin J. Rottet, Dictionary of Louisiana Creole, →ISBN, page 64

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French bâton.

Noun

baton

  1. stick

References

  • Baker, Philip & Hookoomsing, Vinesh Y. 1987. Dictionnaire de créole mauricien. Morisyen – English – Français

Polish

Etymology

From French bâton.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈba.tɔn/

Noun

baton m inan (diminutive batonik)

  1. candy bar

Declension

Further reading

  • baton in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French bâton.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /baˈton/

Noun

baton n (plural batoane)

  1. bar, stick

Declension

Further reading

  • baton in DEX online – Dicționare ale limbii române (Dictionaries of the Romanian language)

Seychellois Creole

Etymology

From French bâton.

Noun

baton

  1. stick

References

  • Danielle D’Offay et Guy Lionnet, Diksyonner Kreol – Franse / Dictionnaire Créole Seychellois – Français

Tetum

Noun

batón

  1. lipstick


English

Etymology

From Middle English wand, wond, from Old Norse vǫndr (switch, twig), from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (rod), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn, twist, wind, braid). Cognate with Icelandic vendi (wand), Danish vånd (wand, switch), German Wand (wall, septum), Gothic ???????????????????????? (wandus, rod).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) enPR: wŏnd, IPA(key): /wɒnd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /wɑnd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒnd

Noun

wand (plural wands)

  1. A hand-held narrow rod, usually used for pointing or instructing, or as a traditional emblem of authority.
  2. (by extension) An instrument shaped like a wand, such as a curling wand.
  3. A stick or rod used by a magician (a magic wand), conjurer or diviner (divining rod).
    • 1859, George Meredith, The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, Chapter 13:
      Love is that blessed wand which wins the waters from the hardness of the heart.
  4. A stick, branch, or stalk, especially of willow.
  5. A card of a particular suit of the minor arcana in tarot, the wands.

Derived terms

  • magic wand
  • violet wand
  • water wand

Translations

Verb

wand (third-person singular simple present wands, present participle wanding, simple past and past participle wanded)

  1. (transitive) To scan (e.g. a passenger at an airport) with a metal detector.

References

Anagrams

  • Dawn, Dwan, dawn

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch want, from Proto-Germanic *wanduz (wickerwork; barrier, fence). Cognate with German Wand.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʋɑnt/
  • Hyphenation: wand
  • Rhymes: -ɑnt
  • Homophone: want

Noun

wand m (plural wanden, diminutive wandje n)

  1. wall
  2. face (as in mountain face)

Derived terms

  • binnenwand
  • buitenwand
  • rotswand
  • tussenwand
  • wandcontactdoos
  • wandtapijt

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: wand
  • Negerhollands: wand

German

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ant

Verb

wand

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of winden

Old English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɑnd/

Etymology 1

From Proto-Germanic *wanduz (mole), from Proto-Indo-European *wendʰ- (to turn, twist, wind, braid).

Noun

wand f

  1. mole (animal)
Declension
Derived terms
  • wandeweorpe

Etymology 2

From windan.

Verb

wand

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of windan

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