Battalion vs Regiment what difference

what is difference between Battalion and Regiment

English

Etymology

From French bataillon.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /bəˈtælɪən/

Noun

battalion (plural battalions)

  1. (military) An army unit having two or more companies, etc. and a headquarters. Traditionally forming part of a regiment.
  2. (US, military) an army unit having two or more companies, etc. and a headquarters; forming part of a brigade.
  3. Any large body of troops.
  4. (by extension) A great number of things.

Synonyms

  • (great number of things): heap, horde, load, mass, pile, swathe

Translations

Verb

battalion (third-person singular simple present battalions, present participle battalioning, simple past and past participle battalioned)

  1. To form into battalions.

Anagrams

  • antibloat


English

Etymology

From Middle French regement, régiment, and its source, Late Latin regimentum (direction for government; course of medical treatment), from Latin regō (rule).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛdʒɪmənt/

Noun

regiment (plural regiments)

  1. (military) A unit of armed troops under the command of an officer, and consisting of several smaller units; now specifically, usually composed of two or more battalions. [from 16th c.]
    • 1901, Rudyard Kipling, Kim, III:
      It was an old, withered man, who had served the Government in the days of the Mutiny as a native officer in a newly raised cavalry regiment.
    • 2005, Nicholas Watt & Michael White, The Guardian, 28 April 2005:
      As the prime minister insisted that he had “never told a lie” in his life, the Tory leader attacked him for ordering Scottish troops into battle with no warning that their regiments would be disbanded.
  2. (now rare, archaic) Rule or governance over a person, place etc.; government, authority. [from 14th c.]
    • 1576, Abraham Fleming, translating Cicero, A Panoplie of Epistles, XXXIII:
      What place is there in all the world, not subiect to the regiment and power of this citie?
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, IV.8:
      Then loyall love had royall regiment, / And each unto his lust did make a lawe, / From all forbidden things his liking to withdraw.
    • 1832, John Austin, The Province of Jurisprudence Determined, VI:
      And how is it possible to distinguish precisely […] the powers of ecclesiastical regiment which none but the church should wield from the powers of ecclesiastical regiment (on the jus circa sacra) which secular and profane governments may handle without sin?
  3. (obsolete) The state or office of a ruler; rulership. [14th-17th c.]
  4. (obsolete) Influence or control exercised by someone or something (especially a planet). [14th-17th c.]
  5. (obsolete) A place under a particular rule; a kingdom or domain. [14th-17th c.]
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Spenser to this entry?)
  6. (obsolete, medicine) A regimen. [15th-19th c.]

Translations

Verb

regiment (third-person singular simple present regiments, present participle regimenting, simple past and past participle regimented)

  1. (transitive) To form soldiers into a regiment.
    • J. W. Powell
      The people are organized or regimented into bodies, and special functions are relegated to the several units.
  2. (transitive) To systematize, or put in rigid order.

Anagrams

  • metering

Catalan

Etymology

From Late Latin regimentum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /rə.ʒiˈment/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /rə.ʒiˈmen/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /re.d͡ʒiˈment/
  • Rhymes: -ent

Noun

regiment m (plural regiments)

  1. regiment

Derived terms

  • regimental
  • regimentar

Further reading

  • “regiment” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “regiment” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “regiment” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “regiment” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch regiment. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˌreː.ʒiˈmɛnt/
  • Hyphenation: re‧gi‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

regiment n (plural regimenten, diminutive regimentje n)

  1. regiment (division of an army)
  2. regimen, regime (particular system of enforcing discipline)
  3. (obsolete) rulership, governance, rule
    • 1628, Philips Marnix van Sint Aldegonde, “Wilhelmus van Nassouwe”, (modern, redacted version), couplet 2.

Descendants

  • Indonesian: resimen (division of an army)

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Regiment (regiment), from Medieval Latin regimentum, from Latin regimen (rule, direction), from regō (I rule).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɛɡimɛnt]
  • Hyphenation: re‧gi‧ment
  • Rhymes: -ɛnt

Noun

regiment (plural regimentek)

  1. (archaic) regiment
    Synonym: ezred

Declension

Further reading

  • regiment in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Late Latin regimentum

Noun

regiment n (definite singular regimentet, indefinite plural regiment or regimenter, definite plural regimenta or regimentene)

  1. (military) a regiment

References

  • “regiment” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Late Latin regimentum

Noun

regiment n (definite singular regimentet, indefinite plural regiment, definite plural regimenta)

  1. (military) a regiment

References

  • “regiment” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Romanian

Etymology

From French régiment.

Noun

regiment n (plural regimente)

  1. regiment

Declension


Vilamovian

Noun

regiment n

  1. (military) regiment

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