battle vs combat what difference

what is difference between battle and combat

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbætəl/, [ˈbatʰɫ̩]
  • (US) enPR: băt’l, IPA(key): /ˈbætl̩/, [ˈbæɾɫ̩], [bætɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ætəl
  • Hyphenation: bat‧tle

Etymology 1

From Middle English batel, batell, batelle, batayle, bataylle, borrowed from Old French bataille, from Late Latin battālia, variant of battuālia (fighting and fencing exercises) from Latin battuō (to strike, hit, beat, fight), from a Gaulish root from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰ- (to stab, dig). Doublet of battalia and battel.

Displaced native Old English ġefeoht.

Alternative forms

  • batail, battel, battell (14th–17th centuries)

Noun

battle (plural battles)

  1. A contest, a struggle.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Ecclesiastes, 9:11:
  2. (military) A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; a combat, an engagement.
  3. (military, now rare) A division of an army; a battalion.
  4. (military, obsolete) The main body of an army, as distinct from the vanguard and rear; the battalia.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hayward to this entry?)
  5. (military, clipping of) battle buddy
Derived terms
Related terms
  • battlement
Translations

Verb

battle (third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight
    Scientists always battle over theories.
    She has been battling against cancer for years.
  2. (transitive) To fight or struggle; to enter into a battle with.
    She has been battling cancer for years.
Derived terms
  • battle it out
Related terms
  • embattle
Translations

Etymology 2

From Early Modern English batell, probably from Middle English *batel (flourishing), from Old English *batol (improving, tending to be good), from batian (to get better, improve) + -ol ( +‎ -le).

Alternative forms

  • battil, battill, battel, baittle, bettle, batwell

Adjective

battle (comparative more battle, superlative most battle)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England, agriculture) Improving; nutritious; fattening.
    battle grass, battle pasture
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) Fertile; fruitful.
    battle soil, battle land
Derived terms
  • overbattle

Verb

battle (third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To nourish; feed.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To render (for example soil) fertile or fruitful
Related terms
  • batful
  • batten

Further reading

  • battle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • battle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “battle”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • batlet, battel, tablet


English

Etymology

Borrowed from French, from Old French combatre, from Vulgar Latin *combattere, from Latin com- (with) + battuere (to beat, strike).

Pronunciation

  • Noun:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmˌbæt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /ˈkɑmˌbæt/
  • Verb:
    • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈkɒmˌbæt/
    • (US) IPA(key): /kəmˈbæt/, /ˈkɑmˌbæt/
  • Rhymes: -æt

Noun

combat (countable and uncountable, plural combats)

  1. A battle, a fight (often one in which weapons are used).
    • “My tastes,” he said, still smiling, “incline me to the garishly sunlit side of this planet.” And, to tease her and arouse her to combat: “I prefer a farandole to a nocturne; I’d rather have a painting than an etching; Mr. Whistler bores me with his monochromatic mud; I don’t like dull colours, dull sounds, dull intellects; [].”
  2. a struggle for victory

Derived terms

  • combat pay
  • combatant
  • combative
  • stage combat

Translations

Verb

combat (third-person singular simple present combats, present participle combatting or combating, simple past and past participle combatted or combated)

  1. (transitive) To fight; to struggle against.
    It has proven very difficult to combat drug addiction.
  2. (intransitive) To fight (with); to struggle for victory (against).
    • 1671, John Milton, Samson Agonistes
      To combat with a blind man I disdain.

Translations

Anagrams

  • M.B. coat, tombac

Catalan

Etymology

From combatre, attested from 1490.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /komˈbat/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /kumˈbat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Noun

combat m (plural combats)

  1. combat

Verb

combat

  1. third-person singular present indicative form of combatre
  2. second-person singular imperative form of combatre

References

Further reading

  • “combat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “combat” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “combat” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

French

Etymology

From combattre.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɔ̃.ba/
  • Homophone: combats

Noun

combat m (plural combats)

  1. combat (hostile interaction)
  2. (figuratively) combat (contest; competition)
  3. (in the plural) battle; military combat

Derived terms

Verb

combat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of combattre

Further reading

  • “combat” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Norman

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

combat m (plural combats)

  1. (Jersey) combat

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [komˈbat]

Verb

combat

  1. first-person singular present indicative of combate
  2. third-person plural present indicative of combate
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of combate

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