battle vs struggle what difference

what is difference between battle and struggle

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈbætəl/, [ˈbatʰɫ̩]
  • (US) enPR: băt’l, IPA(key): /ˈbætl̩/, [ˈbæɾɫ̩], [bætɫ̩]
  • Rhymes: -ætəl
  • Hyphenation: bat‧tle

Etymology 1

From Middle English batel, batell, batelle, batayle, bataylle, borrowed from Old French bataille, from Late Latin battālia, variant of battuālia (fighting and fencing exercises) from Latin battuō (to strike, hit, beat, fight), from a Gaulish root from Proto-Indo-European *bʰedʰ- (to stab, dig). Doublet of battalia and battel.

Displaced native Old English ġefeoht.

Alternative forms

  • batail, battel, battell (14th–17th centuries)

Noun

battle (plural battles)

  1. A contest, a struggle.
    • 1611, Bible (KJV), Ecclesiastes, 9:11:
  2. (military) A general action, fight, or encounter, in which all the divisions of an army are or may be engaged; a combat, an engagement.
  3. (military, now rare) A division of an army; a battalion.
  4. (military, obsolete) The main body of an army, as distinct from the vanguard and rear; the battalia.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Hayward to this entry?)
  5. (military, clipping of) battle buddy
Derived terms
Related terms
  • battlement
Translations

Verb

battle (third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (intransitive) To join in battle; to contend in fight
    Scientists always battle over theories.
    She has been battling against cancer for years.
  2. (transitive) To fight or struggle; to enter into a battle with.
    She has been battling cancer for years.
Derived terms
  • battle it out
Related terms
  • embattle
Translations

Etymology 2

From Early Modern English batell, probably from Middle English *batel (flourishing), from Old English *batol (improving, tending to be good), from batian (to get better, improve) + -ol ( +‎ -le).

Alternative forms

  • battil, battill, battel, baittle, bettle, batwell

Adjective

battle (comparative more battle, superlative most battle)

  1. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England, agriculture) Improving; nutritious; fattening.
    battle grass, battle pasture
  2. (Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) Fertile; fruitful.
    battle soil, battle land
Derived terms
  • overbattle

Verb

battle (third-person singular simple present battles, present participle battling, simple past and past participle battled)

  1. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To nourish; feed.
  2. (transitive, Britain dialectal, chiefly Scotland, Northern England) To render (for example soil) fertile or fruitful
Related terms
  • batful
  • batten

Further reading

  • battle in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • battle in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “battle”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • batlet, battel, tablet


English

Alternative forms

  • stroggell, strogell (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English struglen, stroglen, strogelen, of obscure origin. Cognate with Scots strugil (to struggle, grapple, contend). Perhaps from a variant of *strokelen, *stroukelen (> English stroll), from Middle Dutch struyckelen (“to stumble, trip, falter”; > Modern Dutch struikelen), the frequentative form of Old Dutch *strūkon (to stumble), from Proto-Germanic *strūkōną, *strūkēną (to be stiff), from Proto-Indo-European *strug-, *ster- (to be stiff; to bristle, strut, stumble, fall), related to Middle Low German strûkelen (“to stumble”; > Low German strükeln), Old High German strūhhēn, strūhhōn (“to stumble, trip, tumble, go astray”; > German strauchen, straucheln).

Alternative etymology derives the base of struggle from Old Norse strúgr (arrogance, pride, spitefulness, ill-will) + -le (frequentative suffix), from Proto-Germanic *strūkaz (stiff, rigid), ultimately from the same Proto-Indo-European root above, which would make it cognate with dialectal Swedish strug (contention, strife, discord), Norwegian stru (obstinate, unruly), Danish struende (reluctantly), Scots strug (difficulty, perplexity, a laborious task).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈstrʌɡəl/, [ˈstɹʌɡl̩]
  • Hyphenation: strug‧gle
  • Rhymes: -ʌɡəl

Noun

struggle (plural struggles)

  1. A contortion of the body in an attempt to escape or to perform a difficult task.
  2. (figuratively) Strife, contention, great effort.

Derived terms

  • class struggle
  • power struggle

Translations

Verb

struggle (third-person singular simple present struggles, present participle struggling, simple past and past participle struggled)

  1. To strive, to labour in difficulty, to fight (for or against), to contend.
  2. To strive, or to make efforts, with a twisting, or with contortions of the body.

Usage notes

  • This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive. See Appendix:English catenative verbs

Translations

Anagrams

  • gurglets

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial